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Thread: rookie buying a boat

  1. #1
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    Default rookie buying a boat

    So I just started boating this year. I rented out the military's 22 footer several times and am now thinking instead of paying them $300 a night that I might just buy a smaller boat and save on rent fees. I don't know a lot about boats and am not a mechanical guy so I want something that isn't going to break down. With that being said I have decided on an outboard for sure. where I am stuck at is wood/fiberglass/epoxy and aluminum. I know aluminum is preferred, but this will be my starter boat so I don't need to go high end. Is there a major advantage to aluminum vs. the rest? I also found a boat that I like and it has an Evinrude engine and im not 100% sure about them. From what I read they seem reliable, but can anyone confirm in AK mining and diving services them? (going to call them tomorrow) I hope links are ok on here Here is the boat I am going to take a look at on craigs list Titled: Great vintage boat ready to go (hopefully no one buys this out from under me): http://anchorage.craigslist.org/boa/5102455709.html

    I will mainly be using this to halibut/cod/rockfish out of homer/seward/PWS
    Any tips?

  2. #2
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    Aluminum is the preferred because you can beach the boat when you need too. There is far less up keep on aluminum than with glass or wood. Your not going out very far with that boat in IMHO. I don't really look at a boat as a starter boat and then buy up from there, it will cost you more in the long run than if you would of just purchased the best bang for the buck to fit your needs right now and in the future. Unless you just want to buy an antique I would suggest buying a bit newer 22' for the area's you have stated you want to fish. That boat and the price they are asking you are buying the motors and they are giving you the boat and trailer. I would shop around..... there will be far better deals in Sept and the end of the season to purchase a much better boat to fit your needs.

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  3. #3
    Member Sobie2's Avatar
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    Don't buy your own boat thinking you will save on cost, $300/day is a bargain!

    Sobie2

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    NO NO NO on anything wood or wood covered with fiberglass. I think Sobie is giving you some great advise. Save yourself a ton of headaches with wood and save up some money till you can afford either a nice glass or metal boat. NO old outboards either.

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  5. #5
    Member Jimw's Avatar
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    Aluminum all the way. you can beat it, bang it, beach it, go high and dry, if that happens and you are still good to go. I would go with welded aluminum. Plus they are very low manintanance.....
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    Member tlingitwarrior's Avatar
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    As experienced boat owners will tell you, the cheapest part of being a boat owner is the original purchase price........................
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  7. #7
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sobie2 View Post
    Don't buy your own boat thinking you will save on cost, $300/day is a bargain!

    Sobie2
    We have a winner!!!

    Unless you're going to be using a boat more than a dozen days a year, it will be cheaper to rent one than to own one.

    Vintage boats and project boats are the most expensive boat you can own. You'll learn BOAT stands for Break Out A Thousand over and over and over again and instead of spending time on the water with the boat, you'll be working on it or paying someone to work on it. Since you say you are not mechanically inclined, you absolutely don't want a project boat!!!

    You need to figure out how you want to use the boat and then pick an appropriate boat for your use. When you've picked an appropriate boat, then you'll have to figure out what it will cost for that boat and save until you can afford it. Nothing worse than thinking you'll be saving by getting a boat inapropriate for your use.

    As a builder and owner of a fiberglassed wood boat, I'd say you can't beat Aluminum for Alaskan waters and winters. Summer is short, choose a boat that can be maintained with a pressure washer.

    I'm not recomending any of these as I know nothing about them but:

    Probably in need of some maintenance due to it's age, but you can do a lot with an 18' skip provided you keep an eye on the weather. Personally I'd rather have a 20' skiff with a 50 horse, but for the money with likely minor upgrades this would be a capable boat.

    https://anchorage.craigslist.org/boa/5095529282.html

    Hideous pilot house and lookes like a flat bottom so will pound in a chop, but alot of boat for the $

    https://anchorage.craigslist.org/boa/5083368701.html
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  8. #8

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    Good advice, I hate renting but buying a boat has a couple downfalls: Maintenance, storage, cost, long time to resell. I always heard that the best two days of owning a boat are the day you bought it and the day you sold it, but I feel sorry for anyone that actually feels that way. I love the ocean, love the boat, it's worth whatever it costs (you'll be happier if you don't keep track!). Figure out what you can afford and save enough for gas, accessories, fees, repairs, sucks to get a boat and worry about how much it costs to fill it up.

    I would recommend aluminum, 22' min, outboards (My Suzuki's have done awesome). You can get by with a smaller boat if you pick the weather right, but things can change quick out there.

  9. #9
    Member Sobie2's Avatar
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    This is as great a starter boat as you will find: http://anchorage.craigslist.org/boa/5121898703.html

    But still, consider renting...

    Sobie2

  10. #10

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    Any smaller, and you are into a pretty marginal ocean boat. That has all the essentials: Place to get out of the wind, GPS, Sounder, Kicker Motor. If you go any bigger, I'd look for one with a real cabin you can sleep at least 2 in, my cabin is too small to sleep two adults.

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