Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Road bike for + 60 with bad back & fussed neck discs.

  1. #1
    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Alaska, Mat valley
    Posts
    1,195

    Default Road bike for + 60 with bad back & fussed neck discs.

    Got the bug to upgrade from a 40 lb Mt bike
    DSCF4953.JPG
    to a better/faster bike for the paved & gravel roads.
    I can do about 50 miles on the 29er but hauling over 40 lbs up & over hatcher is tough.
    BIL says I need a road bike, but with 2 fused neck discs , I get a sore neck after a mile trying to look up from the drop bar bikes.
    + being bent over my lower back won't take it & starts to ache, (herniated disc surgery) .
    Test rode the cyclocross, a bit better, but still get off them hurting.

    Been looking at the flatbar road bikes.
    Found a Diamondback insight with carbon forks (no listed weight)
    http://www.diamondback.com/bikes-roa...d-insight-disc

    & REi has the Cannondale Quick 1 , Flatbar (22 lbs) with carbon forks:
    http://www.rei.com/product/877751/ca...2015#tab-specs
    Quick1.jpg


    Then there is the all carbon ones, guy has to dream
    None in AK but can be special ordered.
    Not being able to test ride one, size & geometry are an issue.

    Flatbar road bike , hyd disc brakes.
    Looking at all the major names, not a lot to choose from.

    Wish they'd post the weight of the bikes.

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Palmer, ak
    Posts
    473

    Default

    My wife and I each got a Kona Rove. Great road bike so far

  3. #3
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,274

    Default

    My Townie,, crank forward design, is the one that allows me to ride again. I have a back back, neck and wrist nerve damage. The Townie has a crank forward that allows the bike to be ridden in an upright posture.
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
    Founding Member
    http://www.residenthuntersofalaska.org/

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    1,902

    Default

    When I bought my Trek 29er, I had been riding the gf's Trek comfort bike. I did a lot of testing before I plunked my money down. Ended up with a Trek Marlin, Gary Fisher over the comfort bike, but I had them add a adapter on the handle bar riser that gave me another 3 inches of height to the bars. I can't ride hunched over. Go with the higher bars, and a comfortable seat on a bike that fits you. Maybe all you need to do is make some adjustments to the 29er your riding now. Check out a handle bar riser.
    Have you ridden a fat tire bike?
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

  5. #5
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction AK
    Posts
    4,055

    Default

    Concur with Ross... handlebar riser totally changes the game for folks with neck issues. I also upsized the frame on my 29er over the recommended size so I could get a more upright ride. I don't have the straddle clearance a dedicated off roader would want but it makes cruising gravel and hard trails much better.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

  6. #6
    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Alaska, Mat valley
    Posts
    1,195

    Default

    I have the 29er (Trek skye) set up to where it is comfortable.
    upgraded gel seat & I wear bike shorts, added ergo grips & an adjustable stem to shorten the reach & raise the bar up about 2-1/4" with room to bring it up more if needed.
    It's just heavy, ( 34 lbs for just the bike ) 41 lbs with the stuff (not counting a full water bottle )
    DSCF5287.JPG

    One of those things that, now that I found I like riding distance, & most of my riding is on the road, an upgrade to what I have is a bug in my ear
    telling me I "NEED" to upgrade.

    I got the mt bike for the comfort .
    not knowing there are upright road bikes more suited for the style of riding I'm doing.
    A lighter weight bike might help me get over Hatcher, & extend the distances I ride now.
    & 10 to 15 lbs lighter weight bike is intriguing, how much farther & faster can I go with better technology ?
    + that bug in my ear LOL

  7. #7
    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Alaska, Mat valley
    Posts
    1,195

    Default

    Looking at the cost & varieties of a mid quality road bikes that also will handle gravel roads,
    can be pretty expensive & confusing.

    Wife thinks I should get a professional bike fit to know what bike geometry
    fits my old bones, before I spend money on a new bike.

    My thoughts is to buy a frame & style I like ten go in & have it made to fit.
    May stick with the 29er for a while .

    More research needed before I lay out the $$ for another bike.

  8. #8

    Default

    In my opinion, if you have a bad back and are looking to ride dirt/gravel roads, a road bike is NOT what I would be looking for. The jarring you will get riding something like that with a rigid frame will be worse than anything you would get on a mountain bike. You might get away with a cyclocross bike, but your better option is the mountain bike with shocks locked out or set very stiff. The larger volume tires will provide some cushion and you can adjust the shocks if needed for more. Get less knobby tires if you are looking to ride faster.

  9. #9
    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Alaska, Mat valley
    Posts
    1,195

    Default

    Yea, better tires & lighten up the mt bike is a good option. at 41 lbs, I'm sure there are lighter ones out there.

    Some bike buddies say with near 2000 miles this year ,90% on the roads , I need a road bike.

    A cyclocross with a flatbar set up might work too.

    Us guys never loose "the need for speed" LOL

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Willow/Moose Creek
    Posts
    473

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mudbuddy View Post

    Us guys never loose "the need for speed" LOL
    I saw you passing that nice touring rider in Wasilla Monday. Should have asked her opinion since it looked like she was on a road bike

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Southcentral Alaska
    Posts
    567

    Default

    You need a professionally fit bicycle. Probably a mountain bike or a cyclocross bike (for comfort and gearing ratios)

    If you are in the $1000 budget range, I recommend The Trek Store in Anchorage. They pride themselves on their professional fit capabilities, and have reasonably priced bikes. If you can convince yourself to up your budget to $2,000 go to rick at RTR. He provides the best custom fit and best deal on new bikes in Anchorage, and he will work with your specific needs. But, I don't think he has any interest in messing around with building bikes with a price tag much below $1,600.

    But, I don't know that. That's just my guess. Call him. 563-2054. He, himself has had to modify the fit of his bicycles in response to getting older and having back problems, so he will have good advice.

  12. #12
    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Alaska, Mat valley
    Posts
    1,195

    Default

    I'm still shopping but so far this one is on top of the list:
    http://www.specialized.com/us/en/bik...-disc#geometry

    Spendy so will have to save up a while
    but want to get a bike that I'll ride many miles on.
    Then go & get it fitted to my old bones.

    Thanks
    called RTR
    He gave me several ideas & directions to consider.
    Plan on visiting his shop next week.

  13. #13
    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Alaska, Mat valley
    Posts
    1,195

    Default

    Decided to go with the local bike shop in Palmer.
    Backcountry : http://www.backcountrybikeandski.com/services/

    Plan to build a flatbar road bike, that fits my old bones,
    to be lighter, good for paved & gravel roads, disc brakes .

    Look something like this
    bkebuild1.jpg

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •