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Thread: Tier I Caribou

  1. #1
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    Default Tier I Caribou

    Got my permit in the mail today. Time to start planning.

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Boater View Post
    Got my permit in the mail today. Time to start planning.
    Always a little exciting to see the permit in the mail. But, why wait until now to start planning? Could have been working on things for months by this point.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by anchskier View Post
    Always a little exciting to see the permit in the mail. But, why wait until now to start planning? Could have been working on things for months by this point.
    Yeah, a Tier 1 permit isn't something you "might" get; if you apply for one, you get it.

  4. #4
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boater View Post
    Got my permit in the mail today. Time to start planning.
    Nelchina caribou are a truly fun hunt. Lace em up and get after it.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

  5. #5
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    Also, caribou are deceptively fast when browsing the tundra- they look like they're barely moving, but they just keep on rolling as they feed. If you're trying to get in front of them for an ambush, get there fast! And once they're past you, forget about it. You'll be huffing and puffing to get over the tundra while they amble away. As mentioned elsewhere, the tundra looks like flat and even terrain from a distance, but it's not- it's wet (in most places) and covered with tussocks, which have been described as resembling bowling balls covered with wet mop heads. Very easy to turn an ankle stepping on them, so you have to be very careful with foot placement with every step. Finally, distance can be very difficult to judge in such open country. There aren't any trees or other reference points to use and things are always farther away than they seem- a good rangefinder will be worth its weight in gold. Good luck- you'll have the adventure of a lifetime!

  6. #6
    Member tccak71's Avatar
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    Me too! I'm really looking forward to this hunt. My kids go to Texas for the summer so this is our best and only camping/hunting trip for the year.

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