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Thread: Wrong hardware for beams. HELP!

  1. #1

    Default Wrong hardware for beams. HELP!

    Well, after choosing the only available hardware from SBS. I think I have a problem. The strong ties are bowing out and the cabin isn't even built yet. Will these hold? I think they are designed for sitting ON the tube. Not suspended above. Any advice? I think I need to unscrew and jack the entire subfloor and beams up, and replace with proper strong ties.16x20 half loft with 8 foot walls.

  2. #2

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    Do you have pictures of your set up?

  3. #3
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    I can help, but need to see the pictures. If you can't figure it out on this sight, email them to me at mhbs@mtaonline.net
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    What I'm thinking you ended up with from the info on your other thread is a j-bolt "hold-down"....these are not, as the name implies, designed to hold anything "up"....I would stop now and seek professional help.
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

  5. #5

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    Having trouble getting pictures to upload from my Iphone. I'll upload when I'm back in town. The strong tie is the ABA44Z POST holder and it is rigged on 5/8 j bolts in sonotubes, the strong tie needs to be supported underneath but right now it just has a washer and nut holding it up..I have it holding up lateral foundation beams. I think im going to jack up the beam, and shim the gap between the bottom of the strong tie and the sonotube, so the base holder is being supported by the concrete and not just the washer and nut
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  6. #6

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    In order to go along with what you have started with you could get some channel steel that would be as wide on the inside of the cross section as the bracket ,just the way the picture is taken. It would need to be as deep as the bracket is thick below the beam. Drill a hole in the center and take the top nut off and jack up the beam and insert the piece of channel over the J bolt and the leg part of the channel would be up against the bottom of the beam. Not sure that I explained it so that you can grasp what I am saying. The ideal way would be to have some heavy brackets welded up . I think that this way will do the trick.

  7. #7
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    You are using the bracket wrong. It needs to be sitting flush on the concrete, not hanging off that lower nut. Remove the beam and cut down the threaded stud so the beam will sit in the bracket without hitting the stud.

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    Like this.
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  9. #9

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    I think I'm going to add support underneath the brackets, couple pieces of 2x4 and some metal shims should give it enough support without causing everything to go out of level. Or I might try and jack it way up and remove the bracket and replace with proper peice of hardware. What SHOULD I have used?

  10. #10

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    Mr. Rick , I think what he is trying to do is to have a way to adjust in case of thing getting uneven. He could achieve what you are talking about and still have a way to adjust it. If he would do something like I was talking about in my post before.



    Quote Originally Posted by NRick View Post
    You are using the bracket wrong. It needs to be sitting flush on the concrete, not hanging off that lower nut. Remove the beam and cut down the threaded stud so the beam will sit in the bracket without hitting the stud.

  11. #11
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    Are the concrete columns the same height? If so do as NRICK described. That post bracket is designed to sit flush on the supporting surface....especially if you are building a cabin on top of it. An alternative could be shim blocks but there goes the beauty of same height support posts.

  12. #12
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    The intention of that bracket is to make a "stand off" for vertical posts. This keeps the post from absorbing moisture from a flat concrete surface. It also locks in the base of the vertical post. Simpson does a poor job of describing the brackets you have as "adjustable" since they really are only adjustable in the horizontal plane. There really isn't a retrofit solution for your problem. What should have been used would be what is called an EPB44 or CB44 and it would have been cast into the concrete when you poured. I am not a big fan of adjustable bases for cabins. I have yet to encounter a decent engineered adjustable base for sonotube applications. Simpson makes a bracket that is called a EPB44T that has a threaded rod attached to it that you can put into a hole in the top of the sono tube. While this allows vertical adjustment of beams, it doesn't lock down the cabin to the foundation, nor does it provide very much resistance to horizontal shear.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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