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Thread: High-thumbs -up grip on a revolver

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    Member wiiawiwb's Avatar
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    Default High-thumbs -up grip on a revolver

    I've had many semis but am new to revolvers. Just got a SRH Toklat and I've been handling it and dry firing before going to the range. I also looked at a number of videos that discussed grip technique.

    Of all techniques the one that feels most comfortable and secure for me is the high-thumbs-up grip as demonstrated by Chris Cerino. Are there any downsides to gripping the revolver in the manner?


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    I have never seen anyone do that.

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    I too have a Toklat and had to adjust for the dangers of pressure. I would rather you watch this video...it helped me. Always stay clear of the cylinder with 50,000psi guns! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gEHNZFTfSD8


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    Also shooting a 454 "Toklat" and an "AK".

    I've tried the hold in the video in the past.............. The thumb resting on the recoil plate gets sore fast..................... Might work OK on a handgun with less recoil...

    OR maybe I'm doing it wrong....................
    "The older I get, the better I was."

  5. #5

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    The cylinder blast from big bores (454,460,500) has me pretty wary of getting my thumb close to the cylinder. I would hate having to take my shoes off to count to ten.

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    Thumbs look backwards to me. Use that left thumb to pull the right thumb down like this. Pretty standard grip. Keeps that thumb out of the way of cylinder gap blast. Plus you can then use it to re-cock the hammer while maintaining your strong hand grip. The off hand index finger can go on the front of trigger guard also if desired.

    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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    Also....

    http://www.shootingusa.com/PRO_TIPS/.../miculek2.html




    The third feature of a proper revolver grip is the use of the non-firing hand. I try to get seventy percent of the control of the revolver by use of the non-firing hand so it is very critical to apply it correctly. What I consider a proper revolver grip is to use both thumbs, wrap them over, and pull tightly. What this allows me to do is to get about seventy percent of control with my non-firing hand and also allows me to loosen my grip with the firing hand. But the big thing here is consistency of presentation to the target. Anytime you have your thumb up or your finger out in front of the cylinder, your asking to get hurt so Iím back of the cylinder gap, my fingers are wrapped, and I am using both hands to control the muzzle.
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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    Member wiiawiwb's Avatar
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    Jerry Miculek has an asset that many people, including myself, don't have. He has massive hands. At the very end of this video, it shows his hand position as he's shooting a 44. His right thumb is over his left, sitting on top, but not locked together.



    When I went to the range for the Toklat's maiden voyage I used the grip that Snyd shows in post #6. It felt secure in my hand shooting mild factory 45LC. We'll see when I eventually get to the 454 round but that won't be until after I've shot +P 45LC.

    I'll try to take a picture of my hand position and post it up.

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    I tried shooting my Smith and Wesson 329PD with a high thumb grip. It snapped my thumbnail in half. I'm a little gun shy of a high thumb grip on a heavy recoiling revolver.

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    I with Snyd and Jerry,no high thumb
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    At the very end of this video, it shows his hand position as he's shooting a 44. His right thumb is over his left, sitting on top, but not locked together.

    I'm right handed and this is how I shoot all my handguns.

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    Left thumb over right thumb...revolver or pistol if you like your thumbs.
    Somewhere along the way I have lost the ability to act politically correct. If you should find it, please feel free to keep it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lowrider View Post
    Left thumb over right thumb...revolver or pistol if you like your thumbs.
    Not for semi-auto pistol. Stronger more stable grip is both thumbs forward along the top of the frame and strong hand over week hand (so if you're right handed right thumb over left) for a semi-auto. By doing it the way you mention, you actually torque your strong hand off axis and weaken your grip by putting downward pressure on your strong side thumb. That weakens your strong side wrist.

    As to the grip from Chris Cerino shown above, I noticed a lot of people commenting on that video said he could never shoot a big bore that way. Not that I care about this particular topic, but in the video below at 3:40 he shoots a .454 Casull then backs that up with a .460 Magnum at 4:10. This grip may not be everyone's best, but for Chris it works even with the big bores.


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    To each their own, but it sure doesn't make sense to me...but then...I've only been successfully teaching combat shooting for 40 years or so. Thumbs belong on the grip not stuck up in the air.
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    These guys must be tougher than me(or maybe shoot more than I), I tried all these grips without success. Went back to what works for me, locked thumbs normal grip? The grip with his right thumb over the left one hurt like he**, unnatural for me, I'm right handed.
    Steve

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lowrider View Post
    To each their own, but it sure doesn't make sense to me...but then...I've only been successfully teaching combat shooting for 40 years or so. Thumbs belong on the grip not stuck up in the air.
    While I can appreciate your experience, times change and knowledge and understanding of technique changes. What was right 40 years ago has since been improved. Grip is personal preference, that's true, but in general if you are shooting a semi-auto with both thumbs on the grip your bore axis is much higher than it needs to be. One benefit of modern low bore axis pistols is getting your grip as high on the firearm as you can. That allows the recoil to drive more linear into your arms as opposed to causing your wrists to break (not literally) and causing the muzzle to flip. Grip in line with bore axis gives you faster follow ups with less muzzle flip. Thumbs down on the grip forces the pistol higher in your hands and means moving the bore axis higher. You also lose a lot of contact with the "beaver tail" area of most modern semi-autos, which makes it less stable in your hands.

    That said, shoot how you feel comfortable for sure. There is no one size fits all. However, there are ways to improve your shooting by using more modern grips. Shooting a semi-auto the way you shoot a revolver (thumbs crossed) means you will give up efficiency that can make you a better shooter. But it's not like you have to by law.

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    Keeping the bore axis low in the grip is why I shoot Glocks and not Sigs. and I've shot them since before they were popular in the US. What works for you is what's right for YOU...I suppose you don't put you weak hand finger on the front of the trigger guard either...and I really don't care, but it helps steady the gun IMHO.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lowrider View Post
    Keeping the bore axis low in the grip is why I shoot Glocks and not Sigs. and I've shot them since before they were popular in the US. What works for you is what's right for YOU...I suppose you don't put you weak hand finger on the front of the trigger guard either...and I really don't care, but it helps steady the gun IMHO.
    You should try the Arsenal Strike pistol. Russian made I believe. Lowest bore axis on the planet in a semi-auto. Or the Chiappa Rhino.

    I don't put my weak hand finger on the trigger guard for a myriad of reasons. Again, not trying to change you, but improvements in methodology have shown there are more effective ways to steady the gun. One reason is that since I don't want to be tied to one single type of firearm, I can't rely on that trigger guard to be shaped like the Glock which means I'd be at a disadvantage if using another pistol with a rounded trigger guard. Also, rotating your weak hand forward and downward in a pronounced angle is more effective at creating stability. Not that competition shooters are the only way to go, but look at the grip professional competitors are using now. Weak hand rotated forward pretty far. If you've never shot that way, it's weird. But it's the way the top shooters grip. Some of that can be translated into real world or combat shooting. There are other reasons, but those are the top on the list. It's not like suddenly you aren't going to be able to shoot if you use a different grip, my point is just to say there are ways to improve your shooting if you're willing to step outside the comfort zone. (And for the record, I have tried finger on the trigger guard and it actually detracted for me.)

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    I've found that I am able to keep good control of the 454 with my left thumb locking down over my right thumb (right handed shooter). It's under so much control I've decided not to even try the high-thumbs up grip.

    Here's something I find interesting. Jerry Miculek has one grip on the 44 magnum yet a completely different grip on the 500 Magnum. In fact, I've never seen a grip on a big bore like he handles the 500. Compare the grip on this video with the end of the video in post #8 above:



    Miculek's thumbs are on either side of the 500 Magnum. If I saw someone at the range holding a 500 like that, I'd bet the farm it would be flying out of their hands. It doesn't seem logical that Miculek would be able to control the recoil of something as massive as the 500 but obviously he can.

    Any thoughts why his grip is completely different when using the 500 vs. 44?

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wiiawiwb View Post
    Any thoughts why his grip is completely different when using the 500 vs. 44?
    It's because with a traditional grip the .500 hammer bites the web of his hand during rapid fire, and he doesn't care for that.
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