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Thread: Copper river footwear?

  1. #1
    Member Frozen6bt's Avatar
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    Default Copper river footwear?

    I'm going on my first dipnetting excursion next week. Going to take the charter out of O'brien creek. What kind of foot wear would be best? I don't relish the idea of being in hip boots all day but I have them. I'm leaning towards my knee high Muck boots but suggestions are welcome.

  2. #2
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    You'll most likely by standing on scree and breakdown all day if you're dipping the canyon with the charter. Boots with good ankle support are not a bad idea but I've dipped there in tennis shoes.

    I dip the Copper every year and I've yet to dip one foot in the water. You don't really want in the water.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

  3. #3
    Member Frozen6bt's Avatar
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    Thanks Hodgeman. I have some good hiking boots that should do the trick then as well. I don't plan on getting wet either....

  4. #4

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    Even tho no one plans on getting wet, catching fish is a slimy and damp activity.
    I swear by my 'barnyard Bogs', which have good tread. They're comfy and keep
    my feet warm. Muck boots are great if they have traction. If the soles are slick,
    hiking boots might be a better choice. But your boots might not be quite the same
    afterwards . . . You should not need hip boots, definitely not. I do wear rain pants
    because my clothes stay dry and cleaner that way.

  5. #5
    Member Frozen6bt's Avatar
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    No problem getting wet landing fish, I meant I don't plan on swimming.... Not that anyone does.

  6. #6

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    Whatever you wear on the drop-off, have your waterproof boots and rainpants ready to wear if it rains and definitely when you clean fish. Having additional dry footwear for camp is a small luxury.

    And don't forget your hands, especially if you're dealing with gillnet. A few cuts from salmon teeth and handling dozens of fish can take its toll on bare hands.

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