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Thread: Hunting scope for Alaska.

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    Default Hunting scope for Alaska.

    I am preparing to go on a DYI moose hunt in Alaska. I have purchased most of the gear and am double checking everything. While I was looking at my rifle I started to debate with myself whether I should replace the scope. Currently I have a Redfield revolution 4-12 x40mm on it. It has not given me any problems. However with the cost that I am paying for the trip and with the bumpy plane ride, I would hate for it to fail. If it was you, would you keep it on or replace it with a Leupold vx-2 or 3? Thanks for the help!


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    Quote Originally Posted by outdoorsman_3 View Post
    I am preparing to go on a DYI moose hunt in Alaska. I have purchased most of the gear and am double checking everything. While I was looking at my rifle I started to debate with myself whether I should replace the scope. Currently I have a Redfield revolution 4-12 x40mm on it. It has not given me any problems. However with the cost that I am paying for the trip and with the bumpy plane ride, I would hate for it to fail. If it was you, would you keep it on or replace it with a Leupold vx-2 or 3? Thanks for the help!



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    the only question I have is - how does it deal with water? A real downpour - not just a shower or drizzle. Moose hunting often takes place near/on lakes, ponds, rivers, creeks, etc. Getting your rifle dunked is a real possibility. Heavy rain (in September) is a real possibility. If the scope can handle it, fine. If you have doubts, upgrading to a Leopold is never a bad idea. You certainly don't need a 12x scope to hunt moose, but keep it dialed down & you should be good to go.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary View Post
    the only question I have is - how does it deal with water? A real downpour - not just a shower or drizzle. Moose hunting often takes place near/on lakes, ponds, rivers, creeks, etc. Getting your rifle dunked is a real possibility. Heavy rain (in September) is a real possibility. If the scope can handle it, fine. If you have doubts, upgrading to a Leopold is never a bad idea. You certainly don't need a 12x scope to hunt moose, but keep it dialed down & you should be good to go.
    Actually.....from what I remember Redfield is now a division of Leupold. And if they are building their "Redfields" as good as the original Redfield used to build them, then being waterproof shouldn't be a problem. Redfield was always a great scope......
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    As others have stated id be more concerned with water. If you are ok with the water issue I would strongly strongly suggest a GOOD aluminum or steel gun case. I learned the hard way this past spring with 2 guns I inherited. At least on the commercial flights. Once you get into the bush plane ditch the hard case altogether.
    Tomorrow isn't promised. "Never delay kissing a pretty girl or opening a bottle of whiskey." E. Hemingway

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    So how should I test it for water? Leave it dunked in a tub overnight?


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    Member Roland on the River's Avatar
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    I would go with a leopold 2x7 and you would sleep real good knowing you have the best. good luck and keep it on 2x until you need to power up on a longer shot.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    Actually.....from what I remember Redfield is now a division of Leupold. And if they are building their "Redfields" as good as the original Redfield used to build them, then being waterproof shouldn't be a problem. Redfield was always a great scope......
    May well be. Are the Redfield scopes similarly priced as those under the Leopold label? If not, then there is probably a difference in quality. My first scope was a Redfield, but its been a loooong time since I've even considered buying anything but a Leopold.

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    I doubt there is any difference in waterproofness or seal quality between the Redfield and a VX series. Or a difference in the erector assemblies for that matter. Those sorts of parts might very well be exactly the same between all of Leupold's products.

    There will be a difference in glass and especially coating quality but lots of moose have been killed with far worse scopes.

    If your scope is performing fine- I'd say carry on and not worry about. A Scope Coat, cover or flip up caps might not be a bad spot to drop $20 though, just to protect it in the field and keep water and debris off the lenses.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary View Post
    May well be. Are the Redfield scopes similarly priced as those under the Leopold label? If not, then there is probably a difference in quality. My first scope was a Redfield, but its been a loooong time since I've even considered buying anything but a Leopold.
    I really can't say to the quality of the Redfields Leupold is making today as I haven't owned one. But, like you, I had an original Redfield and it was a great scope even though I only own Leupolds these days. I doubt that even the old Redfields ever were of the same quality as Leupold. I think they are still a bit cheaper, but as hodgeman said, that would be just because of the glass used. As far as all the rest of the scope I'd be surprised if they weren't built quite well. I know if I was the op and had no reason to doubt the scope to date, I sure wouldn't worry about it.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    OP, I there is much concern, what about getting a second scope to have along for the 'just incase'? Get a good quality scope, get it set up so that IF you needed it, it would not be too big of an issue to swap out. An extra scope would not take up too much space or weight and just might save the day!
    Good luck on you up coming hunt!

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    Member jdb3's Avatar
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    I've been using the VX2 for years and have gone to the 1x4 instead of the 2/6. If I can't see it well enough to hit with 4 power I should not be shooting at it. It is also lighter. That being said, I have a World Class Tasco on my 338 that has given me years of service without problems too. I do live where it is known to rain a little bit! Jim

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    I am a huge Zeiss riflescope fan but had the opportunity to compare it to a Leopold VX2 just a couple months back and felt it to be of very good quality. I haven't compared the Redfield Revolution to anything but cannot imagine Leopold manufacturing an inferior scope in this day and age.
    Additionally I did some research and read a lot of reviews on the Redfield Revolution and the majority of the reviews are very positive in regards to the quality, especially for the price. There were zero negative comments that I could find specific to moisture ingression, in fact the worst review still said it was a good buy for the price.
    I'm of the same opinion of "Hodgeman" below that there have been a lot of animals killed with far worse scopes and that if it were me I would just ensure you have a quality Scope Cover, Flip ups or something to add the extra protection.
    Best of luck to you!

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    I've been hunting up here in lots of wet places (Bristol Bay and Southeast) and have been using a burris and leupold VX-1, have had absolutely no issues with fogging or loss of zero and even with larger calibers etc. I have had cabela's scopes fail (miserably) but anything above the $200 mark should offer the dependability you require. I still cannot justify scopes over $400 bucks for my shots at 200 yds or less. I would suggest if you want to drop the coin on glass, do it for your binocs or spotting scope. there i ahve noticed a difference with the top end glass, much easier on the eyes etc.

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    The 40mm might be the thing. The light gathering would be the question for me. The bottom line is do you have confidence in the scope? IF not replace it! The other easy answer that you can't go wrong is to buy the best that you can afford, maybe a little more and don't look back.
    Semper Fi and God Bless

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    I've had a Burris scope on my rifle that's been on there for 20 years and it's never fogged and I've absolutely beaten the hell out of it.

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    On a side note I have bought waterproof soft gun cases for years now that float. I was with a hard core duck hunter many years ago and he said he flipped a boat and it saved his shotgun - then I thought well it would also protect the gun from rain while transporting the firearm.. There were many models on the market for shot-gunners but I had to snoop around a bit to find models that would hold a scoped rifle. So, it not only may save a gun from a trip to the bottom of the lake but your gun is not sitting in a soaked gun case during a remote hunt either...
    I would not be afraid of a Redfield scope failure from rain, however I always take a spare scope along for any failure possibilities.. Never needed it, but never needed many things thankfully!
    When asked what state I live in I say "The State of Confusion", better known as IL....

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    My buddy Ray does a lot of gunbroker business and recently sent a big boomer to Alaska and took in on trade a Remington 700 ADL in 30-06. It was the most beat up rifle that I have ever seen. I wanted to buy it from him sort of cheap like just to hang it on the wall as a piece of art. It was wearing a cheap 4X Universal scope made in Florida that was minus all the finish on the edges. It was still clear to look through with a tint of yellow but still serviceable.

    I would imagine that the folk in the bush that make do with what ever is handed down would get a chuckle out of all of our fretting over details. Yet if I were investing in that kind of hunt I would fret as much as the next guy.

    I too have decided that I'll never need more than 4X on a hunting rifle....just a personal preference. I have a couple of the old Redfield 1-4X 20 mm tube rifles from back when they were as good as any scope on the market. Then they went through a period of time where it was crap shoot as to whether or not you would get a good one. I breathed a sigh of relief when I heard that Leupold took them over. No scope manufacture is immune from turning out a bad scope but the ratio of bad ones to good ones as well as how they deal with the bad ones is very important. The folks at Lupy are as good as they come in regards and I reckon that means even if it says Redfield on it.

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