Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Adding UHMW to a Wooldridge

  1. #1
    Member mntransplant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    S. Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    359

    Default Adding UHMW to a Wooldridge

    I'm just kicking around ideas for now. I am looking at buying an 18' Wooldridge (older model). I really like inboards but would definitely prefer to have UHMW on the bottom. This boat is 18' long and I'm not sure how wide it is. I understand that the plastic itself is somewhat affordable but the glue itself is the expensive part. Is there anyone in AK that does the install? (I prefer small boat shops VS big boat dealers. Also for people who have done this to their boats, is it worth the Money spent? and where did you have it done?
    Thanks everyone

    James
    -At what point does "against all enemies foreign and domestic" apply to politicians?

  2. #2

    Default

    I have a 20' wooly and have been thinking the same thing. This is the 15th year for the boat and it is still going strong. My next question is my bottom isn't exactly flat anymore. What about the dents I already have?

  3. #3
    Member boondockinak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Somewhere North of the lesser 48
    Posts
    72

    Default

    I've never looked into UHMW so I don't have much to offer. I do know that it's pretty spendy, so one might consider counting the costs. An older wooldridge like that can run some decent shallows, but they were typically a pretty narrow bottom, stinkin heavy, and don't compare to these newer hot rod modified sleds that folks are running around with (i.e. phantom, extreme shallow, sea ark, wide bottom Wooly). That said, if you're going to try to run the super skinny and keep up with these newer boats (hence the reason for UHMW), you should probably be looking for a different hull. You might also take the $$ into account. These are older boats, and if you don't hold onto it forever, you probably aren't going to get all of that $$ out of the boat if you dump all that cash back out of it. UHMW does help, but you need to ask yourself if you really have the right boat for what you want to do with it before you empty the bank.

    Regarding the hull/bottom damage, does it cavitate? Are you getting any drag from the damage? Pics would help. Dents on the bottom is a pretty vague description. Post some pics and I'm sure some folks can chime in. Ultimately, you should have it professionally looked at by someone who lives and breathes boat bottoms for a living, every day. Wrong time of year, and it will probably be like pulling teeth, but you could swing by Greatland in the valley to have him look at it for you.

    Good luck.

    -Rob
    ~Alaska born and raised~ •'04 Duckworth, 5.7 w/ 3-stg. •High side Lowe, '13 Yami 25 prop+Merc 40/30 jet
    •Ranger 6x •CAT atv w/ 27" rubber •A very large moose buggy •M7 153" "Earned, NOT given"

  4. #4
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer, AK.
    Posts
    4,115

    Default

    Yanert,
    Skip olsen in fbx, 322-3291.
    Builds airboats, piece of cake for him to do.
    Bk

  5. #5

    Default

    Jeff Leadens in Soldotna 907-260-4863

  6. #6
    Member DanielApplin's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    344

    Default

    I've done quite a few boats. I think it's worth the money, especially for getting around some skinny water. Unless your boat is already pretty strong it will still dent with a hard impact. Don't glue it, bolt it on with about 400 5/16 bolts

  7. #7
    Member Yukoner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Whitehorse Yukon
    Posts
    1,340

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by boondockinak View Post
    I've never looked into UHMW so I don't have much to offer. I do know that it's pretty spendy, so one might consider counting the costs. An older wooldridge like that can run some decent shallows, but they were typically a pretty narrow bottom, stinkin heavy, and don't compare to these newer hot rod modified sleds that folks are running around with (i.e. phantom, extreme shallow, sea ark, wide bottom Wooly). That said, if you're going to try to run the super skinny and keep up with these newer boats (hence the reason for UHMW), you should probably be looking for a different hull. You might also take the $$ into account. These are older boats, and if you don't hold onto it forever, you probably aren't going to get all of that $$ out of the boat if you dump all that cash back out of it. UHMW does help, but you need to ask yourself if you really have the right boat for what you want to do with it before you empty the bank.
    X2.
    UHMW is only going to be helpful running super skinny, and older IBs, well, that's not really their forte'. Older IBs make a great do it all boat, but if you just want a UHMW bottomed skinny water boat, just buy a Sport a Jet equipped Exteme Shallow or similar.
    Never wrestle with a pig.
    you both get dirty;
    the Pig likes it.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    100

    Default

    The UHMW on my Jetcraft has screws like DanielApplin describes and has done well over the past 5 seasons. I check them once a year and have only had to occasionally tighten a loose one. I think if you are running around shallow water with small gravel, etc. I would not bother but we have large boulders and ledges of rock that we regularly run over. Last week I hit a submerged boulder and it took a nice chuck of the plastic off the rear of one of the strakes that was covered in UHMW and sheared one of the mechanical fasteners.... not a big deal for me to fix.

    For those of you that have it glued how is it holding up?

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    14C
    Posts
    62

    Default

    I have an old custom made heavy gauge flat bottom 16' x7' boat that I have considered putting UHMW. I opted for GatorGlide instead. $$$ and hull shape were the reasons I haven't done UHMW yet. I talked to the airboat place in the valley and he said the paint on slippery coating is great and helps protect the aluminum if I decide to plastic the bottom later. I got one year out of the coating, not bad since I just paint it on again. The paint has made my 2,000lb boat able to be pushed off the trailer with one arm. I used to have to winch it off when out of water. I may eventually plastic the bottom since I have learned I can run in 2-4" as is but have been very happy with the paint on stuff.
    I am aware it isn't the same protection as plastic but sure helps when stuck. Last year I was bear hunting and parked in an eddy which dried up while I was out. Came back to a boat on large wet rocks and two of us easily pushed it back to water. As the season went on and I wore the bottom off it was less slippery. Overall I like it and it is cheap.

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •