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Thread: Dispatch story about kenai bears

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    Default Dispatch story about kenai bears

    And we have the usual crowd with their witty comments.
    " the elder bears were murdered" , and so on. More entertaining reading the comments than the story

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    You just gotta skip the story and go right to the comments. Always awesome.
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    Its like "shooting fish in a barrel" was my favorite quote. Obviously the people posting those comments have never baited bears before. Takes much time and work in order to be successful. Its amazing how disconnected from true wildlife some people are.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 33outdoorsman View Post
    Its like "shooting fish in a barrel" was my favorite quote. Obviously the people posting those comments have never baited bears before. Takes much time and work in order to be successful. Its amazing how disconnected from true wildlife some people are.
    Those are the folks you walk among. Many of them could be from anywhere-else-USA, and have no real understanding of what Alaska has been. But they are a powerful opinion block and will dictate how the rest of Alaska will interact with resources.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 33outdoorsman View Post
    Its like "shooting fish in a barrel" was my favorite quote. Obviously the people posting those comments have never baited bears before. Takes much time and work in order to be successful. Its amazing how disconnected from true wildlife some people are.
    Two Words - Fair Chase

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    Quote Originally Posted by Akbig1bear View Post
    Two Words - Fair Chase
    I won't comment on what bait-station hunting entails, because I have never done it or known someone well enough to describe it in enough detail to make a judgment on it. I would be easily convinced that it does take a lot of work and is not as easy as many people may think at a glance. I do hunt quite a bit, and there are plenty of people who have expressed that they feel hunting is pretty much as simple as walking into the woods - any woods - with a gun and shooting an animal. Anyone who has hunted knows there is much, much more to it than that, so why should hunting over a bait station be any different? I'm not saying it is just as hard as any other type of hunting; I'm not saying anything at all. That's the point, unless you've don it, you don't know.

    I will say that ADF&G uses bag limits and means and methods of harvesting game as a management tool. They are tasked with devising regulations that will maintain desired levels of various wildlife, whether it is for the numbers to go up, down, or stay the same. If they want more bears killed in a particular area, perhaps even for their own good, they liberalize the regulations in a variety of ways, including allowing bait stations. People have an emotional response to this a lot of the time, but it comes down to a simple matter of them using the tools at their disposal to do their job as mandated by the people of Alaska.
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    Quote Originally Posted by 33outdoorsman View Post
    Its like "shooting fish in a barrel" was my favorite quote. Obviously the people posting those comments have never baited bears before. Takes much time and work in order to be successful. Its amazing how disconnected from true wildlife some people are.
    I am a person posting that has in fact participated at and hunted a bait station, and yes there was certainly a ton of work setting the station up and returning to bait it but no direspect, really it is not hunting to sit over a baited station and wait for the bears to show up because they will show up and yes, it is 95% unfair chase, the other 5% is getting lucky with direction of wind and being quiet. I take that back, 100% unfair because you have to be quiet and worry about wind during a normal stalk.
    The only, let me say it again, the "only" reasons F&G allows it is because there is enough animals to support it and they feel it helps maintain the level of bears in a certain area or in some cases for predator control.
    I have two very close friends that both swear by baiting stations because "they don't have to go find the bears or hike up a mountain or cross an unexpected deep creek or stalk the bear while worrying about which direction the wind blows.
    It's no different than going fishing with a setnet when you know the fish are in.
    Clearly take the Sport out of Hunting when it comes to bait stations! And I would like to meet the guy that salvages all of the meat and truly eats it from a brown bear.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Akbig1bear View Post
    I am a person posting that has in fact participated at and hunted a bait station, and yes there was certainly a ton of work setting the station up and returning to bait it but no direspect, really it is not hunting to sit over a baited station and wait for the bears to show up because they will show up and yes, it is 95% unfair chase, the other 5% is getting lucky with direction of wind and being quiet. I take that back, 100% unfair because you have to be quiet and worry about wind during a normal stalk.
    The only, let me say it again, the "only" reasons F&G allows it is because there is enough animals to support it and they feel it helps maintain the level of bears in a certain area or in some cases for predator control.
    I have two very close friends that both swear by baiting stations because "they don't have to go find the bears or hike up a mountain or cross an unexpected deep creek or stalk the bear while worrying about which direction the wind blows.
    It's no different than going fishing with a setnet when you know the fish are in.
    Clearly take the Sport out of Hunting when it comes to bait stations! And I would like to meet the guy that salvages all of the meat and truly eats it from a brown bear.


    It's funny how how one thinks that sitting over bait is unfair. What's a berry patch? Fish spawning stream? Gut pile from a kill? Knowing where the pea vine plants are at? It's knowing what a bear will eat and focusing your time on that area. Aside from the rut, bears are always looking for food. Baiting has been going on for a LONG time and is not a garranty I've spent 3- 20hr sits this year and the Bears for what ever reason did not come in. I hunt bears every year first and foremost for the meat and yes to brown bear also, next for predator control and last for a nice rug. It's not a "sport" and should never be called as such. It's HUNTING plain and simple.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FullFreezer View Post
    It's funny how how one thinks that sitting over bait is unfair. What's a berry patch? Fish spawning stream? Gut pile from a kill? Knowing where the pea vine plants are at? It's knowing what a bear will eat and focusing your time on that area. Aside from the rut, bears are always looking for food. Baiting has been going on for a LONG time and is not a garranty I've spent 3- 20hr sits this year and the Bears for what ever reason did not come in. I hunt bears every year first and foremost for the meat and yes to brown bear also, next for predator control and last for a nice rug. It's not a "sport" and should never be called as such. It's HUNTING plain and simple.


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    If I recall correctly, if you shoot a brown bear spot and stalk you don't have to recover the meat. However, if said brown bear is show over bait you have to get the bear out whole? Do I understand that correctly? What is the reasoning behind that?

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    You do NOT have to take the entire Brown Bear out WHOLE. You do have to salvage the eatable meat.......IF harvested at a bait station. HOWEVER, You do not have to eat said meat, or even process said meat.

    The "WHY"........is because.....in order to get a registration Brown Bear hunt on the Kenai Peninsula, that included harvesting over black bear bait station...........you have to appease the group that is opposed to that method of hunt becoming a reality. It is called the bend'over cost you pay to get what you want.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jayz12 View Post
    If I recall correctly, if you shoot a brown bear spot and stalk you don't have to recover the meat. However, if said brown bear is show over bait you have to get the bear out whole? Do I understand that correctly? What is the reasoning behind that?

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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    You do NOT have to take the entire Brown Bear out WHOLE. You do have to salvage the eatable meat.......IF harvested at a bait station.

    The "WHY"........is because.....in order to get a registration Brown Bear hunt on the Kenai Peninsula...........you have to appease the group that is opposed to that hunt becoming a reality. It is called the bend'over cost you pay to get what you want.
    Thank you. I didn't have the regs and was going off of memory. Figured I was at least partly incorrect.

    Does brown bear meat make good table fare?

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    GOOD....????? Yes. (assuming not on a diet of fish). However many people have mental issues that taint their taste opinion. Just like millions of people think that any meat not "USDA" government APPROVED, is dangerous to eat.

    If you gave them Brown Bear meat, and told them it was KOBE BEEF, they would say it taste exquisite. And if you fed them KOBE BEEF and said it was Brown Bear meat, they would say it taste vile.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jayz12 View Post
    Does brown bear meat make good table fare?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Akbig1bear View Post
    I am a person posting that has in fact participated at and hunted a bait station, and yes there was certainly a ton of work setting the station up and returning to bait it but no direspect, really it is not hunting to sit over a baited station and wait for the bears to show up because they will show up and yes, it is 95% unfair chase, the other 5% is getting lucky with direction of wind and being quiet. I take that back, 100% unfair because you have to be quiet and worry about wind during a normal stalk.
    The only, let me say it again, the "only" reasons F&G allows it is because there is enough animals to support it and they feel it helps maintain the level of bears in a certain area or in some cases for predator control.
    I have two very close friends that both swear by baiting stations because "they don't have to go find the bears or hike up a mountain or cross an unexpected deep creek or stalk the bear while worrying about which direction the wind blows.
    It's no different than going fishing with a setnet when you know the fish are in.
    Clearly take the Sport out of Hunting when it comes to bait stations! And I would like to meet the guy that salvages all of the meat and truly eats it from a brown bear.
    Do you hunt whitetails from a stand? In WI, MI, Sask, or any other state/province that allows baiting? Not really much difference, even if baiting isn't allowed. It all depends on stand/bait location. The location is what you've hunted for. If you pick a poor location, a bait stand is just as unproductive as a poor whitetail stand. Hunting bears over bait also allows a hunter to observe a bear (often at close range) to be certain it doesn't have cubs. Our baiting season (spring) also negates - to some extent - the factor of thick brush.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Akbig1bear View Post
    I am a person posting that has in fact participated at and hunted a bait station, and yes there was certainly a ton of work setting the station up and returning to bait it but no direspect, really it is not hunting to sit over a baited station and wait for the bears to show up because they will show up and yes, it is 95% unfair chase, the other 5% is getting lucky with direction of wind and being quiet. I take that back, 100% unfair because you have to be quiet and worry about wind during a normal stalk.
    The only, let me say it again, the "only" reasons F&G allows it is because there is enough animals to support it and they feel it helps maintain the level of bears in a certain area or in some cases for predator control.
    I have two very close friends that both swear by baiting stations because "they don't have to go find the bears or hike up a mountain or cross an unexpected deep creek or stalk the bear while worrying about which direction the wind blows.
    It's no different than going fishing with a setnet when you know the fish are in.
    Clearly take the Sport out of Hunting when it comes to bait stations! And I would like to meet the guy that salvages all of the meat and truly eats it from a brown bear.
    Wasn't meaning to start a debate on this thread about the fair-chaseness of bear baiting. You have had a different experience than me, I've baited for four years and am amazed at how smart those bears can be. It was not as easy for me as setting up a barrel, throwing some dog food in it, show up a week later and shoot a bear. I would constantly change tactics to try to bring bears in. Compared to shooting a bear off a gut pile or shooting a black bear on a known berry patch, it may be harder to bait a bear in. Last year I was on a moose hunt and our first morning of hunting there was a beautiful chocolate bear on a gut pile a previous hunter left. This area was permit only for bear, but if it was open that bear would have been very easy to harvest. He would have charged us before he moved off that gut pile. I've helped shoot one bear off a gut pile and it wasn't hard at all. I've been in a berry patch and saw half-dozen black bear in less than an hour and could have shot any of them, but didn't really want too. Wouldn't have been hard. I've been fortunate enough to harvest a brown bear and when deciding where to go, I wanted to go to a known moose rutting area cause I knew the predators wouldn't be far away. Sure enough a brown bear was chasing a bull moose. I was using moose as my bait.

    Man uses bait to harvest animals. Basically the argument boils down to natural bait vs. man made bait. Bears can be easy to harvest through either method of baiting. Very few areas are spot and stalk hunting of bears possible in AK. Lot's of alders and willows and spruce means tough spot and stalk conditions.

    Read the comments below that ADN article and you'll see how uninformed people are and they've forgot that humans kill stuff in order to eat meat or in cases harvest other animals to protect their meat supply.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Akbig1bear View Post
    Two Words - Fair Chase
    You speak as if there is one supreme definition of "Fair" that we all accept. Such is not the case. I would say that fair does not exist in nature. Animals use their evolved abilities to survive. Humans have evolved abilities and the use of those abilities is no more "unfair" than any other animal that uses its abilities.
    Each hunter has every right to use all legal methods at his disposal. There is nothing unfair about that. If you, Akbig, down in Kentucky wish not to bait, certainly none of us would diagree. Please don't get on a pedestal and think you can point down at us who are baiters.
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    Hundreds of years ago Native Americans would dig out a trough just wide enough and deep enough. Then they would put corn down in the trough and hide above it out of sight.

    When the geese would fly over and see the corn they would land and walk on over. Before long they would walk down into the trough to feed on the corn. The Indians would wait till nearly all the geese would get down into the trough before they made their move. When it was time they'd jump up and run down into the trough to try and catch the geese.

    If they had dug out the trough properly they usually did very well as the geese would have to run down the trough because their wings were too wide to open them and allow them to fly away, and it was too deep for them to be able to jump out of it quickly. Maybe a few would be able to run up and out of it to get away but most couldn't before they were caught.

    Baiting has been around for a very long, long, time......
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    Really?? So you really believe that? Why do you think it isn't required to salvage the meat on a regular sport hunt?

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    As a matter of fact I agree, it would be much the same and no I do not hunt from a stand and will never ever hunt over a bait station again after my one season experience. Hunting bears over a bait station to make sure they don't have cubs is poor way to validate doing it.

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