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Thread: Exact hunting unit boundary

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    Member JR2's Avatar
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    Default Exact hunting unit boundary

    So I am trying to figure out the exact boundary of of one of our game units in a particular spot. It borders a bay and I am curious if the mean high tide line is the boundary or maybe some other random line in the sand or grass. I have not been down to F&G in anchorage but the last time I was for another boundary question they were really clueless and the lines on there maps were about about a mile wide. Can anyone point me to exact description of unit boundaries or the rules they use?

    Thanks

    John
    2007 Kingfisher 2825 - Stor Fisk

    Civilization ends at the waterline. Beyond that, we all enter the food chain, and not always right at the top. -- Hunter S. Thompson

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    Default Exact hunting unit boundary

    Go on their website. Took about 15 seconds of googling.

    http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm...ngmaps.gmuinfo

    Usually it is the "continental divide" type line between drainages that is the boundary

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    Member JR2's Avatar
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    I will answer my own question, partially... http://adfg.maps.arcgis.com/home/ helped quite a bit. Have to open the viewer, find the area and then change the base map to aerial photos and it gives you a decent idea of the location of the line if you are familiar with the area.
    2007 Kingfisher 2825 - Stor Fisk

    Civilization ends at the waterline. Beyond that, we all enter the food chain, and not always right at the top. -- Hunter S. Thompson

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    Questions like this are best asked of a wildlife trooper. Any question when having the wrong info could result in a citation should be asked of troopers - NOT F&G. In most cases, F&G has no more idea than someone you would ask on a street or on an open forum.
    Having said the above, I would think that a unit boundary being a bay (where a different unit was across the bay) the divider would run down the center of the bay. High tide line to high tide line makes no sense as there would be a lot of area that wouldn't be covered by any regs at low tide.

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    Member JR2's Avatar
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    This particular boundary appears to be the top of the beach along the end of the bay. No worries the species I am interested in is open in either area, just different times and different tags... but they do overlap and I can get both sets with no problem... I was more curious than anything.

    So how does one decide where to tag an animal in this situation, if I shoot an animal in one unit and it runs to another, is the tag punched in the unit its hit or the unit it dies in.....
    2007 Kingfisher 2825 - Stor Fisk

    Civilization ends at the waterline. Beyond that, we all enter the food chain, and not always right at the top. -- Hunter S. Thompson

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    Member Roland on the River's Avatar
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    Take a trooper and a lawyer hunting with you!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by JR2 View Post
    So how does one decide where to tag an animal in this situation, if I shoot an animal in one unit and it runs to another, is the tag punched in the unit its hit or the unit it dies in.....
    Personally, I would tag it where you initially shot it, not where it died. Your hunting and shooting happened in that unit, the fact that it ran to a different unit should not matter. The regs are specific to where you are doing the hunting/shooting. A person's hunting wouldn't suddenly be legal if they hunted/shot an animal in a closed area and it happened to run to an open area to die, so wouldn't think it would go the other way either.

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    I thought hunting was supposed to be FUN..............not HELL.

    Quote Originally Posted by Roland on the River View Post
    Take a trooper and a lawyer hunting with you!!!

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    I volunteer myself for the lawyer, I'll waive the hourly rate if you pay for the travel!

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    I have a chip in my handheld GPS that tells me what the unit boundaries are and who owns the land I am on.
    This would be very helpful in your case I would think.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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    Member Gr is for Greg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JR2 View Post
    ...So how does one decide where to tag an animal in this situation, if I shoot an animal in one unit and it runs to another, is the tag punched in the unit its hit or the unit it dies in.....
    I've wondered this myself and even asked the "Ask a Trooper" section on this forum, years ago -> no response. It's one of those things that's not specifically addressed in the laws, and therefore, they will pretty much not give you a response to a hypothetical, which is honestly too bad.

    It's a fun hypothetical, but I have been faced with more than one real-life situation and had to make game-time decisions. One was a goat tag for a particular drainage where I was hunting very near the watershed divide. In my defense, I was there because it offered a great vantage to view the area I wanted to hunt, which was comfortably inside the given drainage. I hadn't expected to find a goat up there, so of course ... I did. It was on the right side of the drainage, but barely. I figured if he ran even as little as 200 yards from the shot in the most likely direction - away from me - he'd break the divide and be in a closed area. I passed up the shot, but admittedly, it was also because I couldn't positively ID it as a billy and I didn't want to shoot a nanny. If I had been able to confirm the sex, I may well have pulled the trigger and hoped for the best.

    Another instance was up on the Haul Road. We came across a small group of caribou right at the 5-mile mark; my GPS was literally reading 5.01 mi from the closest point on the road, and the caribou appeared. My brother shot a nice bull, and it ran parallel to the road about 80 yards before dying, so it was still outside of the no-shooting corridor, but only by about 20 yards. If it had run toward the road, we would have had a dead animal in a closed area. We figured it would take a complete a-hole to give a ticket for that situation, but all the same, could we have gotten into trouble for that?? Would that have been illegal?

    Obviously, it's best to give yourself enough of a buffer to eliminate these types of scenarios, but s__ happens out there. When you're presented with the opportunity, and the only thing that would cause a problem is if the animal runs the wrong way after you shoot it, what do you do?

    -Gr
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gr is for Greg View Post
    I've wondered this myself and even asked the "Ask a Trooper" section on this forum, years ago -> no response. It's one of those things that's not specifically addressed in the laws, and therefore, they will pretty much not give you a response to a hypothetical, which is honestly too bad.

    It's a fun hypothetical, but I have been faced with more than one real-life situation and had to make game-time decisions. One was a goat tag for a particular drainage where I was hunting very near the watershed divide. In my defense, I was there because it offered a great vantage to view the area I wanted to hunt, which was comfortably inside the given drainage. I hadn't expected to find a goat up there, so of course ... I did. It was on the right side of the drainage, but barely. I figured if he ran even as little as 200 yards from the shot in the most likely direction - away from me - he'd break the divide and be in a closed area. I passed up the shot, but admittedly, it was also because I couldn't positively ID it as a billy and I didn't want to shoot a nanny. If I had been able to confirm the sex, I may well have pulled the trigger and hoped for the best.

    Another instance was up on the Haul Road. We came across a small group of caribou right at the 5-mile mark; my GPS was literally reading 5.01 mi from the closest point on the road, and the caribou appeared. My brother shot a nice bull, and it ran parallel to the road about 80 yards before dying, so it was still outside of the no-shooting corridor, but only by about 20 yards. If it had run toward the road, we would have had a dead animal in a closed area. We figured it would take a complete a-hole to give a ticket for that situation, but all the same, could we have gotten into trouble for that?? Would that have been illegal?

    Obviously, it's best to give yourself enough of a buffer to eliminate these types of scenarios, but s__ happens out there. When you're presented with the opportunity, and the only thing that would cause a problem is if the animal runs the wrong way after you shoot it, what do you do?

    -Gr
    I can't say this is how it would be interpreted in every case, but in one case of a JBER moose hunt, here is what happened. A hunter shot a moose in a legally open area (out beyond the "tank trail" east of Muldoon). The wounded moose (archery shot) proceeded to run west, right across the boundary and died about 50 yards or less from their truck, but well into the closed area. The person who came out to check him said he was legal because he hunted and took the shot in the legal area. There is no way to control where the animal goes after they are hit (usually at least), you can only control where you hunt and take the shot. The hunter had to prove where he initially shot the moose, which he did based on the blood trail, and once that was done, all was good.

  13. #13
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gr is for Greg View Post
    I've wondered this myself and even asked the "Ask a Trooper" section on this forum, years ago -> no response. It's one of those things that's not specifically addressed in the laws, and therefore, they will pretty much not give you a response to a hypothetical, which is honestly too bad.

    It's a fun hypothetical, but I have been faced with more than one real-life situation and had to make game-time decisions. One was a goat tag for a particular drainage where I was hunting very near the watershed divide. In my defense, I was there because it offered a great vantage to view the area I wanted to hunt, which was comfortably inside the given drainage. I hadn't expected to find a goat up there, so of course ... I did. It was on the right side of the drainage, but barely. I figured if he ran even as little as 200 yards from the shot in the most likely direction - away from me - he'd break the divide and be in a closed area. I passed up the shot, but admittedly, it was also because I couldn't positively ID it as a billy and I didn't want to shoot a nanny. If I had been able to confirm the sex, I may well have pulled the trigger and hoped for the best.

    Another instance was up on the Haul Road. We came across a small group of caribou right at the 5-mile mark; my GPS was literally reading 5.01 mi from the closest point on the road, and the caribou appeared. My brother shot a nice bull, and it ran parallel to the road about 80 yards before dying, so it was still outside of the no-shooting corridor, but only by about 20 yards. If it had run toward the road, we would have had a dead animal in a closed area. We figured it would take a complete a-hole to give a ticket for that situation, but all the same, could we have gotten into trouble for that?? Would that have been illegal?

    Obviously, it's best to give yourself enough of a buffer to eliminate these types of scenarios, but s__ happens out there. When you're presented with the opportunity, and the only thing that would cause a problem is if the animal runs the wrong way after you shoot it, what do you do?

    -Gr
    You bring up a good point. Especially when you consider that it would be very hard in many instances to prove where both you and the animal were when you pulled the trigger.
    I have been questioned on where I was standing after shooting a sprucehen. They did accept the word of me and my stepson as to where I was standing when I shot it which was legal and the truth. I was off the roadway by just a few feet.
    It is a hard decision to let a potentially legal animal go because you are not quite sure which side of the invisible boundary line he is on.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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    Member JR2's Avatar
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    In my case the animal is legal to hunt in either unit, just different seasons and tag requirements. There are other animals in the same area that are closed in one unit and wide open in the other. I don't think I would mess with them but as long as I have tags and such for both units and the season is open in both I will hunt.
    2007 Kingfisher 2825 - Stor Fisk

    Civilization ends at the waterline. Beyond that, we all enter the food chain, and not always right at the top. -- Hunter S. Thompson

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    Member Gr is for Greg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by anchskier View Post
    I can't say this is how it would be interpreted in every case, but in one case of a JBER moose hunt, here is what happened. A hunter shot a moose in a legally open area (out beyond the "tank trail" east of Muldoon). The wounded moose (archery shot) proceeded to run west, right across the boundary and died about 50 yards or less from their truck, but well into the closed area. The person who came out to check him said he was legal because he hunted and took the shot in the legal area. There is no way to control where the animal goes after they are hit (usually at least), you can only control where you hunt and take the shot. The hunter had to prove where he initially shot the moose, which he did based on the blood trail, and once that was done, all was good.
    Thanks, that is the way I would have hoped it to work, but I couldn't get anyone to give me a definitive answer. Yeah, gotta watch out for the shooting-from-the-road rule with the grouse and ptarmigan. I have heard multiple accounts of troopers using stuffed birds to nail people. So tempting, but not worth it :0)
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