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Thread: Big trip in the works/First post

  1. #1
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    Default Big trip in the works/First post

    Hello to everyone on this forum, just so you know this is my first shot at using a forum so I'm hoping for some good advice. So I'll get to the point, If all goes somewhat to plan next year I should be coming up to the peninsula again but this time I should be buying a small piece of land to camp on. The land part is a topic for another part of this forum what I'm looking for with this thread is camping advice, I've spent years camping down here in Virginia which has taught me a lot but camping for a couple of month's in Alaska is going to be a hole new and very fun adventure. If all goes well it will be in the Chakok Rd area off of North fork Rd, there is a set of properties I've been to that I like but that can change but It should be somewhere in Anchor point area. Any gear or advice special to Alaska camping would be very helpful, I'm a bare bone's type of camper I only bring what I need to survive so making sure I have the right gear for that area is very important. Thank You!

  2. #2
    Member
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    May 2006
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    Fairbanks, AK
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    Wow that's a big subject so I'll throw in some basics. Buy a good container to store food and keep it away from bears and other animals. I have used a 55-gallon steel drum with a removable locking lid that worked great. Do not assume that putting the food on top of your vehicle is going to keep a bear that is seeking food away from it. Keep your camp as clean as possible to avoid attracting bears. This is pretty **** important because once you create a problem, getting rid of it will require a lot of time and energy and lost sleep.
    Do not skimp on what you will be living in, whether it's a camper, a tent or whatever. Make sure the insect screen/netting is in good shape and take care of it. If it fails, life will be miserable until you fix it.
    Stay abreast of the regulations regarding fires, fishing, hunting, etc. We've had some really bad fire conditions the last few years, and accidentally starting one will cost you big. Even receiving a ticket for burning during a burn ban is a pain in the arse.
    Alaska is a great place but in most populated areas, it is not the old frontier, meaning that if you come up thinking you can act like a complete clown, you will not get along with most of the people living close to you. Most of us are quite tolerant but we do have our limits. You have been up here before so you probably know how to carry on.
    Who knows what kind of summer we will have up here but be mentally prepared for anything from a cool, rainy one to a hot, dry one with fires breaking out everywhere.
    Enjoy yourself.

  3. #3
    Member ChugiakTinkerer's Avatar
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    Apr 2013
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    There's a pretty wide swath of gear and camping styles that will satisfy your planned adventure. Some people camp for months with nothing but a sleeping bag, sleeping pad, and cheap dome tent. Others make do with a wall tent with wood stove and a cot for sleeping. I think gear choices will be driven more by your style and preferences than by any specific environmental conditions you're likely to encounter.

    It may help to think of this trip less as camping than as setting up a temporary residence. You'll want to make sure you have the means to keep yourself and all your stuff dry. If it's a very wet summer you could see rain for days on end. Most tents have their limits, so whatever shelter you have you want to be certain it will keep dry whatever is inside. Think about the worst conditions and plan around those. Snow is possible in June and August, although not very likely. What is likely is a period of rain every day for one or more weeks. Think what activities you'll be doing and how you'll keep water and mud out of your tent.

    Food and cooking should be done away from where you sleep. Unless you are the most impeccable of clean campers you will be leaving crumbs and drips in your cooking and eating area that will over time be an attractant to animals large and small. Set up a separate tarp or awning for your cooking area and when the critters come they won't wake you up in the middle of the night by crawling across your sleeping bag. Consider having a camp stove rather than a fire ring. A large heated tent is a wonderful thing when the weather is the pits for days on end. During times of limited burning a stove with spark arrestor may be more readily allowed than an open camp fire.

    Finally, consider what protection, if any, you want from predators. Bears and two-legged predators pose a small but real risk. Consider ahead of time how you intend to deal with either.

  4. #4
    Member cod's Avatar
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    Some tarps, bug repellant, shotgun with slugs and shot, and a few trail cams. You're gonna want a couple pics of the meth heads that will attempt to make off with your belongings when you leave your camp. You might want the shotgun for protection or to get/keep your stuff from the predators. The troopers do nothing for protection/recovery down here on the Pen.
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!

  5. #5
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Don't know for sure, but I kinda doubt the guy is still looking around here seeing that nobody replied to him for about 8 months....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  6. #6
    Member ChugiakTinkerer's Avatar
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    Lol! I missed that little detail. But I guess that's self-evident, innit?

  7. #7

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    -Good quality rain gear (Helly Hansen, Grunden's etc.) for your entire body.
    -Good quality tent
    -Good quality sleeping bag that does not contain cotton or down.
    -Sleeping pad
    -Lighters, waterproof matches, and firestarters (cotton w/Vaseline is cheap and easy to make)
    -Good quality pocketknife
    -A few pairs of long underwear that is made of synthetic materials other than cotton
    -I can't overemphasize this enough NO COTTON WHATSOEVER!!!
    -Bring lots of warm clothes that do not have cotton. Cotton kills in AK.
    -Wool works good too but can be heavy and cumbersome. Especially in summer.
    -Gun for bear protection. Shotgun with slugs, rifle with a caliber as powerful or more powerful than a 30-06.

    That's bare minimum I would recommend for camping in AK.

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