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Thread: Blasting through coves/Anchorages

  1. #1

    Default Blasting through coves/Anchorages

    To the person who stayed on step from the time he entered Three Fingers Cove Saturday evening all the way to where he anchored. One of these days when you do that, you may just end up killing someone and then wonder why you were in such a hurry. Fortunately my wife and I had finished kayaking for the evening and all we got, along with everyone else anchored for the night, was your wake. You'd saved your spot by tying off your dinghy to your anchor line, so you weren't trying to secure a spot. Good example for the kids you had on board.

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    Is there a no wake sign? I can't remember since the last time I was there....

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by roybekks View Post
    Is there a no wake sign? I can't remember since the last time I was there....
    Shouldn't need a sign for common courtesy in areas like that and when in close proximity to other boats.

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    Member JR2's Avatar
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    Had a guy pull in there this spring and anchor up about 50 ft from me, the rest of the cove was empty.

    And there is not a no wake sign but a little common sense and courtesy goes a long way.
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    Quote Originally Posted by JR2 View Post
    Had a guy pull in there this spring and anchor up about 50 ft from me, the rest of the cove was empty.

    And there is not a no wake sign but a little common sense and courtesy goes a long way.
    I was thinking about the courtesy thing, is there common practice about where a bay begins and where one should start their no-wake objective? (I will have an ocean boat here shortly and don't mind slowing down for common courtesy). I know that I see folks kayaking all over pws but often they are not in a bay....

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    Also, I am not familiar with said bay, but is there a certain bay width that sets the common courtesy rule? Passage canal is technically a bay but I have seen lots of kayakers and wakes in unisan there. I only ask so as to keep the pws an equal opportunity of fun area....

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    Member Tyin 1 On's Avatar
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    Common Sense?? Throw that out the door as there is no such thing out there. Was it at the head of the bay?

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    Member JR2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by roybekks View Post
    Also, I am not familiar with said bay, but is there a certain bay width that sets the common courtesy rule? Passage canal is technically a bay but I have seen lots of kayakers and wakes in unisan there. I only ask so as to keep the pws an equal opportunity of fun area....
    In general when I go into a smaller bay (and three fingers is tiny) I treat it like a harbor, no wake. Anytime I see a boat at anchor I figure its a no wake zone as well. I also go slow in the small anchorages as there are rocks, and very shallow water all over. The back end of the middle finger of three fingers is about 10 ft deep where I like to anchor. No way I am going into that on step, heck no way I would go into the entrance of the cove on step...
    2007 Kingfisher 2825 - Stor Fisk

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  9. #9

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    A cove is quite a bit smaller than a bay, and is where you'll find most people anchoring for the night. If you look at a nautical chart, you'll see lots of places identified as coves. My rule of thumb is that if my being on step is going to create a wake for anyone who is in a cove, then I go at idle speed or at least slow enough to not create a wake. Some people who may be new to boating will slow down thinking that they'll create a smaller wake but end up creating a bigger one. But idle speed or nearly so is in my opinion best. In open water, like bays, I think simply steering clear of kayaks or someone who's drifting or trolling is fine. It's a courtesy thing, something that too many people don't understand or care about.

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    Member DMan's Avatar
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    What kind of boat was it? Do you know the name?
    ... aboard the 'Memory Maker' Making Memories one Wave at a Time!

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    Member hoose35's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DMan View Post
    What kind of boat was it? Do you know the name?
    Looked like a glacier craft, about 28', didn't get the name, but it looked like a two word name
    Responsible Conservation > Political Allocation

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    Member DMan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hoose35 View Post
    Looked like a glacier craft, about 28', didn't get the name, but it looked like a two word name
    Haha! It wasn't me!!!! I was back at port by that time.

    In other news someone pulled at least one string of my pots this weekend and didn't even bother to drop them back close to my mark. I don't blame them too much as I told my wife (she was driving) to go to my waypoints and I would drop. Not realizing there were other buoys very close. After they were in the water and I saw the other buoys they looked to be a safe distance so I left them rather than pulling them. They got moved and probably not too long from when I pulled because they were almost empty. The other gear was gone by the time I got there. Oh well. Was decent weather again this weekend!
    ... aboard the 'Memory Maker' Making Memories one Wave at a Time!

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    Member jrogers's Avatar
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    On a related note, did anyone see the No Wake sign on shore at the bottom of Squire Island? Seemed kind of crazy to me to have there. There is no cove there, it is completely open to Knight Island Passage. Someone put some effort into getting and hauling that big sign down there.
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  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by DMan View Post
    What kind of boat was it? Do you know the name?
    I'm a little hesitant to call someone out on the forum. Send you a PM.

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    Member AKBassking's Avatar
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    And we are trying the define Bay vs. Cove? Really. Common sense and fellow courteously should prevail here regardless....

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  16. #16

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    I also have been anchored in Three Finger Cove and had somebody blast in, not quite on step but still pushing plenty of water. Rocked everybody in there, including me (I'm 45 feet). Next morning, almost everyone else was gone when this same boat comes zipping out of the middle finger, wake and all. This time I stepped out on deck and gave him the universal "slow down" gesture, and he dropped in right down. Looked kind of surprised like "Was I going too fast?" People!

    My rule when I'm approaching an anchorage where other people are already set is Do Unto Others. I idle way back, and even look out the back door to see what kind of a wake I'm making in order to make sure I'm not going to spill anybody's cocktail. The extra minute or two it take to get where I'm going is a small price to pay for being a good neighbor. I'm not shy about (politely) bringing rude behavior such as waking anchored boats in a restricted area to the operator's attention. If enough people do it, they might begin to see the light.
    "Money may not buy you happiness, but it will buy you a big enough boat that you can get close enough for a look."

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    Member jrogers's Avatar
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    Looking out back to see what wake you are making is good advice. Sometimes people slow down so they are half way on step, and the wake they make is worse than if they are running at speed. The same issue happens all the time at the fuel dock where people come too far into the harbor and push a big wake onto everyone fueling boats.
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