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Thread: Share Stories of "Quick Disconnects"

  1. #1
    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    Default Share Stories of "Quick Disconnects"

    Had a couple of other thread and poll about them. Thought that this might be an added interesting approach to it. If you have and stories of quick disconnects saving a hunt or maybe a hunt that would have been saved by them please share them here.
    Semper Fi and God Bless

  2. #2
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    Just thought I'd bump this, to see if anyone could respond.

    I've thought for a long time, "quick disconnects" are basically a gimmick and their only real use would be for someone that wanted to use various scopes on the same rifle.

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    I don't really think they are a "gimmick". I have used them in the past for a trip to Africa. I zero'd my main gun with a scope using the quick disconnect ring and then did the same with a back up scope. If my main scope had been damaged during the numeropus flights over I had a back up scope ready to go. I took both scopes on and off various times and shot them, they both stayed zero'd in. Worked perfectly, didn't have problem with the main scope, but after spending a bunch of money to get there I felt pretty good about having a back up plan.

  4. #4

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    One other advantage is that I can buy one expensive optic for any flattop AR-Platform and switch it from AR to AR even different cartridge, and with one or two rounds for test be dialed in.


    Quote Originally Posted by Gary View Post
    Just thought I'd bump this, to see if anyone could respond.

    I've thought for a long time, "quick disconnects" are basically a gimmick and their only real use would be for someone that wanted to use various scopes on the same rifle.

  5. #5
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    My experience is that I have them on 2 of my bear rifles and in a life time of hunting, I have never had a scope failure. So even though I have them, the only time I use them is to remove the scope to clean the rifle and then my zero has always been true.
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    I've only disconnected/reconnected once with my AR (223) and it held zero completely. Gotta admit, I was surprised. How can you take something off as delicate as a scope and not have it move just a smidge? Impressive.
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!

  7. #7

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    It really is a Jig.......like would be used in a machinist set-up. It aligns with > shaped block on one side and clamp on the other. The only reason it would not be perfect is if there was a stick or log or gravel or debris on/in the bearing surface.

    Quote Originally Posted by cod View Post
    I've only disconnected/reconnected once with my AR (223) and it held zero completely. Gotta admit, I was surprised. How can you take something off as delicate as a scope and not have it move just a smidge? Impressive.

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    I wouldn't say they're a gimmick either, if something were to happen and my scope was broken I can pull it off and use my sights. Also, if I was going into a patch of alders after a wounded bear, I would prefer to go in with open sights vs a scope, and the fact I can pull the scope off and do exactly that is a big plus for me.

    I haven't been in either position yet, so as of now, I run the QD rings for peace of mind. I like to have the option should the need arrive.
    Some people call it sky busting... I call it optimism
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  9. #9

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    Here is an account of my first Alaskan Black Bear (Kind'a Charge) and the value of putting the scope/optic on to finish a wounded bear in the dark and thick alders. Interesting that I now live just down the road from where this happened.

    First of thousands of Alaskan bear encounters.....Enjoy.
    __________________________________________________ ___________________
    Some of you must know Lance T. former head of Habitat at F&G. In about 70' three of us were engaged in unofficial Porcupine control. Back then there were thousands of porcupines, I don't know why. I shot 74 in 60 days that summer. (In case you are prone to being judgmental, save it.....I don't care).

    So we were shooting porky-pines between Los Anchorage and lovely Hope, Alaska. It was about 11:PM mid-May and the last, or nearly last light. We were on the rough "Dirt" road that was the Hope Road. Roughly mile 9'ish. We saw a large'ish Black Bear cross the road, and we pulled up and stopped at the spot.

    Now Lance and the other guy Bill W. both had .22 LR pistols only, for executing Porky-pines. I had a Winchester model 100 in .308 Win. w/ a tip-off scope.

    So we are all on the passenger's side of the truck, and we are listening to this God awful crying and thrashing just fifteen or twenty feet away. It went on and on, and we figured that it was a sow spanking and driving cubs up a tree.

    It was almost dark, and we could hear the crashing coming to us, In one heart beat a bear busted out of the dark woods/alders/willows from about six or eight feet, coming straight at Lance T. With out thinking from the hip I shot the bear as it was with-in a foot or two of Lance T. (and maybe 6" from the muzzle of the rifle).The bear turned and went 180 degrees the way it had come, back into the dark woods.

    Now all Hell broke-out 15 feet away, crying and thrashing, and crashing, and it is now dark-dark. The story is getting long, so I'll wrap it up. I tipped off the scope, went in after the wounded bear (Which was hit center behind the shoulder). I skillfully missed the badly wounded bear three times form 12 feet with iron sights. The bear was just thrashing around NOT coming at me. I eventually flipped the scope back up, and could clearly see the bear and finished it.

    OK, This is what is educational. There were NO bear cubs. The first thing I encountered on entering the woods was a just born moose calf that had a bite in the small of the back and very alive but paralyzed. Next at about 10 feet was the wounded bear thrashing around, and a P!zzed'off cow that was about 12 feet away and lurching at the bear. The calf was crying, the cow was exhaling hard, and the bear was flopping around and crying also.

    We figured that what happened is that we had not seen the cow and calf cross the road, only the bear right behind. And after the bear bit the calf in the small of the back, the cow charged the bear, and the bear retreating from the cow ran straight at Lance T. The bear was trapped between the truck and the cow. Wow I am exhausted. "Oh' but the stores I could tell". Someone here must know Lance T.

    (Many of these stories were first posted on WILDERNESS SURVIVAL FORUM.....under Sourdough Blog........http://www.wilderness-survival.net/f...3751-Sourdough)






    Quote Originally Posted by duckslayer56 View Post
    I wouldn't say they're a gimmick either, if something were to happen and my scope was broken I can pull it off and use my sights. Also, if I was going into a patch of alders after a wounded bear, I would prefer to go in with open sights vs a scope, and the fact I can pull the scope off and do exactly that is a big plus for me.

    I haven't been in either position yet, so as of now, I run the QD rings for peace of mind. I like to have the option should the need arrive.

  10. #10
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by duckslayer56 View Post
    Also, if I was going into a patch of alders after a wounded bear, I would prefer to go in with open sights vs a scope, and the fact I can pull the scope off and do exactly that is a big plus for me.
    I learned to use a scope keeping both eyes open. Whenever I am in close quarters to an animal I turn down the variable to it's lowest and when I bring the rifle up to my shoulder with both eyes open it's nearly no different than having open sights.....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    Here is an account of my first Alaskan Black Bear (Kind'a Charge) and the value of putting the scope/optic on to finish a wounded bear in the dark and thick alders. Interesting that I now live just down the road from where this happened.

    First of thousands of Alaskan bear encounters.....Enjoy.
    __________________________________________________ ___________________
    Some of you must know Lance T. former head of Habitat at F&G. In about 70' three of us were engaged in unofficial Porcupine control. Back then there were thousands of porcupines, I don't know why. I shot 74 in 60 days that summer. (In case you are prone to being judgmental, save it.....I don't care).

    So we were shooting porky-pines between Los Anchorage and lovely Hope, Alaska. It was about 11:PM mid-May and the last, or nearly last light. We were on the rough "Dirt" road that was the Hope Road. Roughly mile 9'ish. We saw a large'ish Black Bear cross the road, and we pulled up and stopped at the spot.

    Now Lance and the other guy Bill W. both had .22 LR pistols only, for executing Porky-pines. I had a Winchester model 100 in .308 Win. w/ a tip-off scope.

    So we are all on the passenger's side of the truck, and we are listening to this God awful crying and thrashing just fifteen or twenty feet away. It went on and on, and we figured that it was a sow spanking and driving cubs up a tree.

    It was almost dark, and we could hear the crashing coming to us, In one heart beat a bear busted out of the dark woods/alders/willows from about six or eight feet, coming straight at Lance T. With out thinking from the hip I shot the bear as it was with-in a foot or two of Lance T. (and maybe 6" from the muzzle of the rifle).The bear turned and went 180 degrees the way it had come, back into the dark woods.

    Now all Hell broke-out 15 feet away, crying and thrashing, and crashing, and it is now dark-dark. The story is getting long, so I'll wrap it up. I tipped off the scope, went in after the wounded bear (Which was hit center behind the shoulder). I skillfully missed the badly wounded bear three times form 12 feet with iron sights. The bear was just thrashing around NOT coming at me. I eventually flipped the scope back up, and could clearly see the bear and finished it.

    OK, This is what is educational. There were NO bear cubs. The first thing I encountered on entering the woods was a just born moose calf that had a bite in the small of the back and very alive but paralyzed. Next at about 10 feet was the wounded bear thrashing around, and a P!zzed'off cow that was about 12 feet away and lurching at the bear. The calf was crying, the cow was exhaling hard, and the bear was flopping around and crying also.

    We figured that what happened is that we had not seen the cow and calf cross the road, only the bear right behind. And after the bear bit the calf in the small of the back, the cow charged the bear, and the bear retreating from the cow ran straight at Lance T. The bear was trapped between the truck and the cow. Wow I am exhausted. "Oh' but the stores I could tell". Someone here must know Lance T.

    (Many of these stories were first posted on WILDERNESS SURVIVAL FORUM.....under Sourdough Blog........http://www.wilderness-survival.net/f...3751-Sourdough)

    Very cool story, BUT it has no bearing on the subject. If you didn't have the tip-off mount (QD mount) you would have probably saved 3 shells, by using the scope to finish the bear to begin with.

    Probably my choice of the word "gimmick" (in post #2) should be reconsidered. Still the only use I see for them is to use either the same scope on multiple rifles (not sure if resighting would be necessary or not) or multiple scopes on the same rifle. As far as going into thick chit for a wounded bear, I'd expect the range to be close (very close) and it would be more of a "point & shoot" situation (like your first shot at the bear in the story), rather than a carefully aimed shot. Maybe some younger eyes than mine can use open sights "quickly", but they take me more time than a scope set on 3x. A ghost ring or big peep sight would be quicker (for me, anyway) but you don't see a lot of rifles so equipped.
    Oh well, its been an interesting discussion, at any rate.

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