Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Spinning Rods on Boats?

  1. #1

    Default Spinning Rods on Boats?

    We have more rods than sense, some of them as old as I am and still in use. My wife recently suggested we stand them side by side to make a picket fence around our property. All 2.5 acres of it!

    But after our winter trip to Florida and fishing with borrowed rods, she suggested new rods. She opened Pandora's box this time, and not me!

    We were using small lightweight spinning outfits in Florida for everything from sea trout to tarpon ranging up close to 4'. The combos were very light in the hand, yet incredibly powerful and long casters.

    She's never mastered casting with conventional reels, so has been hamstrung with an older spinning outfit when circumstances called for casting from our boat. Specifically, we often find kings in places that are impossible to troll, requiring that you lay off and cast to them. An unhappy situation needing help, and she was inspired after Florida. So I went shopping for a king salmon spinning outfit for her, buying two while I was at it of course!

    Older and younger guests on our boat have serious problems with conventional rigs, even for jigging and mooching, much less while fighting fish. The reels want to flip to the bottom rather than staying on top, and it gets both tiring and tiresome for them. Our aim was to put spinning rods in their hands to make life easier. We have storage for 15 rods on our Hewescraft Open Fisherman, so extra rods aren't a hassle.

    Did my research, bought the rods and reels, and now we've proof-tested them. Wow! They work so well that I'm using the "spare" for casting jigs. No sweat so far on kings to 42#. That's not the upper limit for the rods by any means, just the biggest we've managed to hook so far while casting jigs.

    I realize I'm preaching for spinning outfits along with all the other gear on your boat. But man, have they turned out to be a welcome addition to our rod racks. Jigging, mooching and fish fighting have indeed proven easier for anyone not doing well with conventional gear. My wife now casts a mile, and is back to outfishing me, even when casting.

    Pick your own models, but give it some thought. Here's what I settled on: Loomis 9' SAR 1084S Salmon Spinning rods. Penn Spinfisher V 5500 reels. About 2 miles of 40# braid.

    The reels have fast retrieves, perfect along with the extra rod length for kings that race right at you, as they often do in the shallows. I didn't even look at the bill when I had those big reels filled with 40# braid. It looks to be about the size of 10# mono. I didn't want to know how much it cost or how much line was on there. But that 42# king took the spool down to less than half capacity, telling me we'd have been motoring fast to catch up if I'd opted for 25# mono. The rods are rated for 1/2 to 1 1/2 oz weights and line weight to 25#, but they perform really well casting 2 oz jigs or mooching 4 oz weights. Since I'm not pushing the drags to 40#, I'm not worried about the line rating. I can't begin to imagine just how much 25# braid those things would digest!

    Okay, my soap box is stowed. But consider the possibilities with spinning gear on your boat!

  2. #2
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    I've been thinking about getting a pair of spinning rods for the boat the past season or two but haven't pulled the trigger yet. We cast buzz bombs and krocodiles on occasion and having some spinning rods set up with them would be nice to have. Setting up the conventional rods for those is just asking for a birdsnest. We've caught the occasional pink and rock fish with the kids lw spinning rods, but having a medium heavy to heavy rod with a quality spinning real with ~20#'s of drag spooled with 55# braid is more along the line of what I've been thinking and a rod that will handle 2-6 oz jigs.

    Speaking of picket fences, I banged out this rod rack the other night.

    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  3. #3

    Default

    We've always got a couple staged and rigged with silver or gold kastmasters, penn 75 ss's, once we're done with the butts, we'll hang on the hook looking for jumper silvers. Lots of fun casting at the jumpers, well usually get some followers that will chase anything that we can throw at them too.

  4. #4

    Default

    A LOT of my Japanese (and they are crazy about their fishing) friends use nothing but spinning set ups for deep saltwater fishing. The popularity of the Shimano butterfly jigs and such require a supper fast pump and retrieve method that is ideal for spinning. Handles some pretty huge fish too.

    The main reason i don't use them now is that I like more control on the drop with heavy weight. Easier to thumb down conventional gear than slowing line letting out on Spinning. It used to be that the drags on spinning reels were terrible. But now they are as good if not better than on the conventional reels.

    Stewart from B&J had an article on spinning setups for saltwater in the most recent Fish Alaska Magazine. Some freaky expensive gear but some more reasonably priced stuff as well.

  5. #5

    Default

    I run all spinning gear...no more conventionals for me. I grew up spending a lot of time in the Keys and learned exactly what some good spinning gear can do (before it was popular). Up here I use a 7'8" 50-100# Shimano Terez rod mated to a Fin Nor Offshore 5500 with about 400 yards of braid for the big jigs. For light bottom work I run a 7' Shimano 14-30# rod mated to a Penn Conflict 6000 loaded with 55# line. When I'm feeling froggy I just use the ice fishing rod with a small Shimano Stradic spinning reel. Spinning gear is easier and has lots of benefits. I have converted almost everyone I fish with so far. Read the June Fish Alaska for an article on it that I helped with.


    Heavy Hitter Fishing
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Heavy...54441957966186

    Kodiak Custom Fishing Tackle Pro-Staff


  6. #6

    Default

    I'll look for it. Thanks!

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Eureka MT
    Posts
    3,048

    Default

    I have used spinning reels all my life except for serious deep sea fisshing. Many of my friends told me how much better the bait casters are so I bought one. I hate them. So now it's back to either spinning reels or fly reels and fishing instead of wasting half my fishing time clearing a backlash.

  8. #8

    Default

    Growing up around San Diego in the 1960s I was introduced to ocean fishing at an early age, and used all of the usual conventional gear. That is, until a family member gave me the gift of an early-model spinning reel and rod and insisted that I use them. I did my best, but being the focus of constant harrasment from "old timers" on the party boats, all of whom seemed to feel that spinning gear was Japan's revenge for WWII, I either had to return to conventional gear -or- learn to use spinning gear properly. I learned, and practiced, and pretty soon I was catching fish way beyond what most folks were doing. That was a time when you could catch trophy fish just off San Diego and Mission bays, days that are long gone now, but after coming to Alaska I continued having great success with spinning gear, and have raised my kids and grandkids accordingly. I confess to using conventional gear for deep water halibut, but for anything else I break out the spinning gear. Incidentally, folks fishing out of San Diego still feel that spinning gear should be banned from all party boats, but at least they don't threaten to throw infidels and their gear over the side anymore.

  9. #9
    Member AKArcher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    ANC
    Posts
    688

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    I've been thinking about getting a pair of spinning rods for the boat the past season or two but haven't pulled the trigger yet. We cast buzz bombs and krocodiles on occasion and having some spinning rods set up with them would be nice to have. Setting up the conventional rods for those is just asking for a birdsnest. We've caught the occasional pink and rock fish with the kids lw spinning rods, but having a medium heavy to heavy rod with a quality spinning real with ~20#'s of drag spooled with 55# braid is more along the line of what I've been thinking and a rod that will handle 2-6 oz jigs.

    Speaking of picket fences, I banged out this rod rack the other night.

    Nice Rack!
    When all else fails...ask your old-man.


    AKArcher

  10. #10

    Default

    I got my father a Penn TRQS7 mated to a Trevala Spinning rod as well as a TRQ30 on a Trevala Conventional rod last year. For everything from Goliath grouper to halibut it sounds like the spinner gets used 10x as much as the conventional setup. Faster drops, smoother drag, lighter feel/better balance. I have not used the spinner to compare, but it sounds like a winner.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •