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Thread: Who's got the best Copper River dipnet a for sale

  1. #1
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    Default Who's got the best Copper River dipnet a for sale

    The one I've been using has pretty much seen its last fishing trip. Looking to get good one this time. Any recommendations on who has the best net in Anchorage/Wasilla or anywhere along the way to Chitna


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    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gokorn1 View Post
    The one I've been using has pretty much seen its last fishing trip. Looking to get good one this time. Any recommendations on who has the best net in Anchorage/Wasilla or anywhere along the way to Chitna


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    Call me. I'm on the way back from the copper right now, but if I'm not in a dead zone I'd love to share info with you. It partly depends on where you're dipnetting on the river. 1 (907) 229-4501. -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
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    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

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    I left you a voicemail. Thank you

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    Ditto on the voicemail. Thanks.

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    Member BluNosDav's Avatar
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    Why the secrecy about the best dipnet ???

    Nobody is shy about what they think are the best fishing reels (my vote goes to "Accurate", made in Corona, CA),
    or the best fishing rods (I'd say "Seeker", made in Oxnard, CA).

    It's just your opinion of a piece of fishing equipment based on personal experience or the builder's construction materials & techniques.

    So come on, lets hear about your favorite dipnet.

    Thanx, Dave.
    "Luckily, enforcement reads these forums, and likely will peruse this one...Especially after a link of it is forwarded to them....." - AlaskaHippie.

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    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BluNosDav View Post
    Why the secrecy about the best dipnet ???

    Nobody is shy about what they think are the best fishing reels (my vote goes to "Accurate", made in Corona, CA),
    or the best fishing rods (I'd say "Seeker", made in Oxnard, CA).

    It's just your opinion of a piece of fishing equipment based on personal experience or the builder's construction materials & techniques.

    So come on, lets hear about your favorite dipnet.

    Thanx, Dave.
    Sorry if my reply generated some intrigue. I was on the road and could not post a detailed response. Phone was faster. I will try to post my thoughts on this when I get some time tomorrow, as it's not a simple answer. It's 10:30 pm and I have to be up for work at 4am.

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

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    What I found it doesn't matter too much in a eddy real small ones aren't as good though. ..I think in a eddy fish kind of swirl a round an rest....when they are on the move they stay on the bottom....so if you're sweeping from shore you want something with flat sides....if your dipnetting from a boat u want a flat tip which is set on the bottom of the river

  8. #8

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    I like my 4' round hoop and blue extension poles from Frontier Outfitters. I call mine the salmonator. I also use the smaller hoops with aluminum poles that I got from Frontier as well, but the poles tend to bend and crimp, especially in the rocks. I've never tried squared nets, but imagine those would work well for dredging.

    I've had the least amount of misses with my salmonator, but more importantly than the net/pole combo is the fact of keeping your net open. If it's past the hoop, the fish will feel the net and turn before even going past the hoop. Lots of time they will turn, hitting the hoop with their tail giving you a solid bump, but then you pull up nothing. It's frustrating, but more times than not when I've been teaching people to dip out there, the main cause of getting bumps and no fish is because the net is floating past the hoop. I check mine twice as often while dredging and holding in eddy's as those around me, but I tend to catch my fish considerably faster because of it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerod View Post
    ... I check mine twice as often while dredging and holding in eddy's as those around me, but I tend to catch my fish considerably faster because of it.
    As I recall, you were driving your dad's boat and outfishing all of us on your own boat...

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    I found these on CL any thoughts?

    http://anchorage.craigslist.org/spo/5040867231.html

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by gokorn1 View Post
    The one I've been using has pretty much seen its last fishing trip. Looking to get good one this time. Any recommendations on who has the best net in Anchorage/Wasilla or anywhere along the way to Chitna


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    I use a 3' hoop on the end of two blue aluminum extension poles. The net is black heavier gauge mesh and more shallow than most other bags I've seen. I've found this lets me pull fish out much faster than other nets and is more durable than the finer mesh bags I've seen.

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    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Okay the dust is settling a little and I thought I would jot a few notes down on this while it's still fresh in my mind. I realize we have a lot of old hands from the Copper River fishery here, and there are lots of opinions about this stuff. So these are just some preliminary ideas I have based upon my limited experience there.

    1. There is no "one size fits all" net for the Copper. A lot depends on where you are fishing. You can get away with a 40' pole at the bridge, if you're doing the conga line thing. In other places where you have to sweep, you might be better off with a much shorter handle. Kenai nets like the kind you find at Sportsman's Warehouse work great there, depending on where you are fishing.

    2. Bring two nets, at least one or two spare bags, lacing materials, zip ties, and other spare parts. It's a long way to go only to break something in the first few hours (I saw one guy lose his entire net on the first dip).

    3. I prefer gill net over the salmon landing nets you see on the Copper. The reason is twofold: first, if you hang the net up on jagged shale (the canyon and other places are full of sharp shale rock), all you have to do is rip the net loose by pulling on the pole. A guy I was fishing with had this exact experience , and we were able to lace the hole shut with 550 cord. If you hang the mesh on a salmon landing net, you can't rip it, and you may end up losing the whole setup.

    4. I prefer protecting my hoop with garden hose zip-tied around the hoop. Keeps the net from being damaged from impact on the riverbed. That's not a serious issue on the Kenai, because the bottom there is mud or sand. I ran my net rigged this way on the Copper for two days without issue. The increased diameter presented by using garden hose does increase drag in the current, and may make using the Post Method impractical (for descriptions on the "Sweep", "Post" and "Conga Line" methods, CHECK THIS LINK. It's one of our new dipnetting pages.

    More to say on this, but for now this should help someone.

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

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    Stay away from the heavy steel nets. They are too unwieldy when hanging off the rocks over a boiling eddie.

    I like the blue handle ones sold at B&J's in ANC with their smaller net.

  14. #14
    Member BIGAKSTUFF's Avatar
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    I sweep from the shore, and have found 24 feet of pole with a 4' hoop at the end rigged with gill net to be the best set up for me so far. I used to use the square hoops since my starting days back in 1994, but couldn't find a decent one a few years ago when replacing a lost rig(under the dang bridge snag), so I bought four 6' aluminum poles from Donalsons, and one of their 4' foot round hoops. Seems to be working well as I've pulled in my quota every year with it.

    I like gill net when sweeping from shore, because you are working a whole lot more moving 28 total feet of pole while sweeping, and I want that fish to be in there when i pull the net all the way back in! The boat guys have a lot more hits, and time is an issue when flopping out fish, so I can see why they prefer the landing net mesh that doesn't tangle them up.

    One thing to note about the 6' sections of pole; it is nice to have them break down to that length for transport and storage, but when you have so many connections, you start to get 'twist'. Every hole where the connecters pop through will wallow out after heavy use (about 2 seasons) and it becomes harder to keep your hoop upright because of this. This season I had to drill out some new holes for a tighter connection.

    I also used to do the garden hose method to protect my net, it does work, but I found the extra weight would smoke my arms after a while when sweeping multiple days. I also began to curse the dang zip ties that would hang my net up under water and shorten my bag sometimes, meaning fish would hit and get right back out. This year, I used water bottles duct taped to the top of my hoop to increase floatation off the bottm and keep net upright, it worked pretty good.

    As many have said, there are really three different ways to dipnet in the Copper, (shore sweep, boat, and stationary rock methods) and all three require a different set up. The common factor for all three though, is that using your heavy Kenai dipnet will not be enjoyable for any of these three methods.
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