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Thread: Blind project

  1. #1
    Member Sapere's Avatar
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    Default Blind project

    The season is around the bend and I needed a weekend project. I have a boat and blind setup that works fine. However some of my spots arenít entirely boat accessible, and to portage my heavy boat is out of the question. I wanted to build a temporary blind I could bring with me in the boat and walk into these spots. The blind needed to satisfy the following criteria:

    1. Provide better concealment and creature comforts than a mound of marsh grass alone. I've been spoiled inside my heated boat blind.
    2. Inexpensive. I thought about the layout blind option but couldnít justify $300.
    3. Breaks down into manageable pieces for transport. It also helps for storage in the off season.
    4. Light weight and durable. I wonít be lugging it very far from the boat, but weight is always a consideration in these endeavors.
    5. Easily assembled in the fall pre-dawn conditions we are all familiar with. Most of the time Iíll be doing this by myself, so any time I can shave of my set-up routine is time I can spend drinking coffee.

    My first inclination was to build a frame using EMT conduit, but I soon realized the weight and portability wouldnít fit my needs. I did some research and found some plans for PVC blind frames that seem like they would do the trick. I ended up following the plans on this website with some modifications and the result is pretty decent. I added an additional support in the rear of the frame so I could essentially ďpanelizeĒ the frame into three main pieces (front, back and roof) which would be assembled in the field with only three cross members. I think this will also help prevent the cover material from sagging into the blind too much. The blind does have a high-profile however the spots I have in mind for it have a wooded back-drop. I'm confident with the right materials this will disappear.

    Here is where Iím at:







    The next step is to hide the white PVC. I have about a dozen rattlecans of camo paint leftover from painting my boat. I also have a ton of matte camo duct tape rolling around. I feel like the paint wonít adhere very well to the PVC regardless of the prep job and will be less durable than the duct tape. Does anyone have any recommendations?

    The frame cost me about $60 in PVC. I have material leftover from my boat blind (hardware cloth, fabric, fast grass) that I can recycle into this project as well. I feel like the cost was justified, if only for the boost of excitement it gave me for the impending season and the satisfaction of building something I can hunt out of.

  2. #2
    Member AK DUCKMAN's Avatar
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    Definitely go with the tape, paint sucks on pvc. I would make it so the front, back, top are three main pieces. Then the end pieces (2 on one side 1 on the other) Thing would go together in about 60 seconds. If you need too, on the joints not glued, you could always drill them and pin them to hold, or something with bungee cord. Camo the three main sections so they're ready to go. so all you need to do is drape camo over the ends. Don't know what you have for camo fabric but you want something that won't weigh a ton when wet. Then add just a bit of grass to it (I wouldn't get crazy with the grass) and BAM ready to hunt . Can't tell how high it is (front wall ) but would go as low as possible and then just a little bit more. You may want to think about some way to stake it down, on a good windy day it may turn into a kite. Hell cut it down to around 12 inches high and throw on a couple of doors and BAM layout blind. Mount it to a sled throw your deeks in it and off you go. Kind of makes me want to build one and I don't even need it

  3. #3
    Member Sapere's Avatar
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    Thanks Duckman. I appreciate your input- definitely going the tape route.

    Using PVC glue at the joints, I have made the front, back & top into three separate but solid panels. The three end pieces are glued at the joints as well, so they are solid themselves. Good idea about putting some pins in the joints where the end pieces meet the main panels. Right now the fit is pretty snug and I have to pop them in/out with a rubber mallet. I imagine as time goes on the fit will get a little sloppy.

    The camo I have is a lightweight dye-cut poly fabric. I've used it for several seasons already and it performs well. In my experience it doesnít hold a lot of water if any. Iíd place that over a lightweight hardware cloth (plastic chicken wire) so I can zip-tie raffia and other local veggies on the fly. I'd fasten the whole thing to the frame with ties or bungees... not sure yet.

    Front wall is approx. 3 feet high by 6 feet wide. The top of the blind roof is approx. 4.5 feet high at the peak. I have definitely been thinking about a way to anchor the frame into the marsh, because I agree it will be a kite on a windy day.

    The low-profile / sled-mounted layout style blind you described sounds awesome. Maybe that's a project for another day... or perhaps Version 2 of this project depending on how it works out.

  4. #4
    Member AK DUCKMAN's Avatar
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    Can't wait to see dead ducks hanging from it.

  5. #5
    Member akblackdawg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sapere View Post
    Thanks Duckman. I appreciate your input- definitely going the tape route.

    Using PVC glue at the joints, I have made the front, back & top into three separate but solid panels. The three end pieces are glued at the joints as well, so they are solid themselves. Good idea about putting some pins in the joints where the end pieces meet the main panels. Right now the fit is pretty snug and I have to pop them in/out with a rubber mallet. I imagine as time goes on the fit will get a little sloppy.

    The camo I have is a lightweight dye-cut poly fabric. I've used it for several seasons already and it performs well. In my experience it doesnít hold a lot of water if any. Iíd place that over a lightweight hardware cloth (plastic chicken wire) so I can zip-tie raffia and other local veggies on the fly. I'd fasten the whole thing to the frame with ties or bungees... not sure yet.

    Front wall is approx. 3 feet high by 6 feet wide. The top of the blind roof is approx. 4.5 feet high at the peak. I have definitely been thinking about a way to anchor the frame into the marsh, because I agree it will be a kite on a windy day.

    The low-profile / sled-mounted layout style blind you described sounds awesome. Maybe that's a project for another day... or perhaps Version 2 of this project depending on how it works out.
    i would suggest that along with glue, you also get some short (like 3/8 or 1/4) sheet metal screws and put them in at joints as set screws. i have built a couple different boat blinds from pvc and even using waterproof pvc glue, have always had problems with a few joints becoming unjointed and separating, i would predrill the location just not very deep, for the setscrews.
    Wasilla

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    Member Sapere's Avatar
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    Thanks akblackdawg, that's good advice I hadn't thought of. I didn't consider the likelihood of the glue degrading, so it makes perfect sense to add another failsafe before I tape over the entire thing. Between the glue, setscrews and duct tape the 1.25" PVC frame should be pretty bombproof... at least for a few seasons.

    I'll update the thread as I progress; hopefully someone will find it helpful down the road.

  7. #7
    Member Steven_JR's Avatar
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    I'll second akblackdawg's advice. I've built a few 'structures' out of PVC and the metal screws are well worth it. Glue can be unforgiving/brittle and cause the PVC to break. Screws/Pins hold the sections together well and I've had less broken connections that way.

  8. #8
    Sponsor Duckhunter01's Avatar
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    Looks good.. Great advice from seasoned waterfowlers as well. Bend some rebar into a U and use that to stake it down.

    i would also consider lowering the front as well. With the back coming over its going to limit your shooting to an extent. But I'm sure you already knew that.. As long as it's facing the spread.
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  9. #9
    Member Sapere's Avatar
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    Following others advice I used some 3/8" sheetmetal screws at each of the joints in addition to the glue. It seems pretty sturdy, we'll see how it holds up after some abuse in the field.



    I also started taping everything up but have quickly run out of tape. I had about 60 yards of random flavored camo tape, and I think I'll need at least another 30 to finish the job. It's looking pretty good so far.



    Thanks again everyone for the advice! I'll post some more pics when I finish.

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