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Thread: Combat etti-kit

  1. #1
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    Default Combat etti-kit

    Living on one of the best crappie lakes in M'sippi, I've been on the receiving end of the antics pulled by out of state idiots my fair share. I've also fished the opener at Willow Creek a few years ago, and the concept of giving everyone till mid night to get drunk, then line shoulder to shoulder and start slinging hooks was interesting to say the least. I've got a float on the Kasilof, and trip to Wolverine with West booked, which leaves 4 days for bank fishing. Hopes are to get away from the major crowds, and my question involves waiting on a spot-if we run across a group catching fish, rather than try to squeeze in on them, prefer to sit back,let them catch their limits, and take our turn. Suggestions welcomed..

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    Member Roland on the River's Avatar
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    I once was talked into going at midnight and launching the small boat at Sportman's. the deal was the ferry stops running about 11/12 pm so the other bank at the Russian confluence will be nearly empty. Ha Ha. We went way down to tie the boat. walked past a hundreds fisherperson and finally an idea hit me. I should help this German net his fish. So, then I say do you need a break ? I'll save your spot and fish it till you want it back. I ended up catching my 3 fish, the German was tickled that I gave him a bunch of flies and when my buddies returned without wetting a line they couldn't believe I had my limit.
    It pays to be nice and offer to help net a fish, don't you think ?

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    I assume your talking about the kenai for those four extra days? Its definitely a balancing act between being polite and jumping in the middle, if your too polite you'll never get a spot, I certainly don't like pushing my way in either. Depends on the spot and who's fishing there too. On the Russian for instance, most good holes don't hold more than a couple guys and if they know what they are doing you'll never be able to get in to the hole anyway, me and my partner got pretty good at "boxing out" for new anglers there, just a fact of fishing the most popular river in the state. Other times I've been down there by myself and invited guys in that clearly didn't want to get too close, but I knew they could be a lot closer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roland on the River View Post
    I once was talked into going at midnight and launching the small boat at Sportman's. the deal was the ferry stops running about 11/12 pm so the other bank at the Russian confluence will be nearly empty. Ha Ha. We went way down to tie the boat. walked past a hundreds fisherperson and finally an idea hit me. I should help this German net his fish. So, then I say do you need a break ? I'll save your spot and fish it till you want it back. I ended up catching my 3 fish, the German was tickled that I gave him a bunch of flies and when my buddies returned without wetting a line they couldn't believe I had my limit.
    It pays to be nice and offer to help net a fish, don't you think ?
    Ha ha ha, my secret trick is to pick out a group that clearly has no idea what they are doing and offer to help them fix up there gear, usually removing their 3oz. sinkers and making their leader 3' instead of 12 inches. Once they start catching fish they usually invite me to squeeze in!

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    Member Col. F Rodder's Avatar
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    Go out early 4am or later in the evening, crowds are thin. Then during the day while everyone else is out fishing reds, chase some trout on the Russian

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    Quote Originally Posted by Col. F Rodder View Post
    Go out early 4am or later in the evening, crowds are thin. Then during the day while everyone else is out fishing reds, chase some trout on the Russian
    Yeah. My answer to combat fishing is to leave. Odd hours cut numbers and that helps. But also recognize that most of the folks fishing a spot are there because they saw someone else fishing there. Or they heard about it when their father's favorite uncle said his wife heard a woman in the laundromat say that her daughter heard about it at the grocery checkout.

    For me the crowds are great because they free up lots of productive small spots elsewhere. Pay attention to the water and what it has to tell you. There are lots of places away from the idiot holes. Same applies on boats.

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    Member GD Yankee's Avatar
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    If you see some guy slinging a bait caster, one armed, who screams "fish on" every time he snags one, move on, you'll lose an eye.

    Look for guys/gals who look like they know what they're doing (assuming it's so packed you have to move in) and politely ask if they mind if you "work in". Being polite helps. Being a butt doesn't. Roland and Limon's techniques are great ways to make it better.

    If you're going to the Russian, getting on the river early will help - it may well be like last year and be very low. Last year the crowds were thin in the morning and the fish were moving better early.

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    Member AlaskaHippie's Avatar
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    Don't be "That Guy"...
    “Life has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.” ― H.S.T.
    "Character is how you treat those who can do nothing for you."

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    Member c6 batmobile's Avatar
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    What I usually do is chat people up. Ask em where they are down from. Have they ever fished there before etc. If they look like they need help I offer it and I try to net their fish if I want to fish near them when they are done. Another thing I have been doing is finding someone that is walking my way. I talk to them on the way down to the river. We get to know each other a bit and then fish next to each other. They get sorta added to the group. It helps to find a guy that looks like he has a clue, not someone wearing hip waders over chest waders with safety googles and a booney hat with a bunch of russian river flies in it though. Then when Im done if they arent I stick around and help net and hold bags while they clean for another hour or so if Im not in a hurry.
    Makin fur fins and feathers fly.

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    Member Milo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by c6 batmobile View Post
    What I usually do is chat people up. Ask em where they are down from. Have they ever fished there before etc. If they look like they need help I offer it and I try to net their fish if I want to fish near them when they are done. Another thing I have been doing is finding someone that is walking my way. I talk to them on the way down to the river. We get to know each other a bit and then fish next to each other. They get sorta added to the group. It helps to find a guy that looks like he has a clue, not someone wearing hip waders over chest waders with safety googles and a booney hat with a bunch of russian river flies in it though. Then when Im done if they arent I stick around and help net and hold bags while they clean for another hour or so if Im not in a hurry.
    I usually do the same on my bear hunts. Sorry, too easy.
    Death is like an old whore in a bar--I'll buy her a drink but I won't go upstairs with her.

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    Member c6 batmobile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milo View Post
    I usually do the same on my bear hunts. Sorry, too easy.

    LOL. Except I dont shoot their fish!

    Although Ive been tempted to try it on slow days. lol.
    Makin fur fins and feathers fly.

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    Member willphish4food's Avatar
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    parks hwy streams will not be crowded like you've seen before. the fishing will be hook and release only, which is the reason for the much smaller crowds. We're in a time of low abundance, so fishing is severely restricted in order to bring the stock back up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Milo View Post
    I usually do the same on my bear hunts. Sorry, too easy.
    OUCH!!!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    For combat fishing you just stand behind someone catching fish and as soon as he steps out of the way to unhook a fish you take his place. Sometimes you have three or four folks lined up waiting their turn. I no longer combat fish as I have found a spot to catch reds and kings with no one around. HArd to do these days but it is possible.

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    Thought there might be a few stories to tell-no doubt common sense and "do unto others" works most of the time. We'll hopefully get a few fish with the guides for a dinner or two, and spend the rest of the time people watching and wetting a line here and there. Mainly spending time with my son before he and his wife make me a grand pappy in 7 mos. May be our last rodeo up north, and want to see as much of SE as possible.

  16. #16
    Member AF EOD's Avatar
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    Stories? I'll bite!

    On a Parks stream several years back, we spent the afternoon before a midnight opener scouting out a good length of the river. After finding an awesome spot with lots of kings holding, we sat down and enjoyed the weather/company to await the midnight bell. We had it to ourselves for quite a while, but about an hour out, the people came pouring in. This wasn't entirely unexpected, but disappointing nonetheless. Everyone was respectful until "that guy" showed up. I heard him coming from a a quarter mile away... He was singing "your love is like... A ROLLER COASTER!" at the top of his lungs. At a certain point, combat fishing can transition into people watching...I couldn't wait to see this guy. He strolled into view wearing hip waders, tighty whities, and nothing else. He had a bottle of jack in one hand and a spinning rod from 1970 with about a third of the tip broken off. He squeezed in between two anglers downstream from me who were clearly friends and they were a little put out. They asked him if they could swap spots so they could be next to each other and he informed them that they "didn't own the river". Not to worry though, with 15 minutes to go till midnight, he got tired of standing there, went to the bank and passed out. Even after we all started fishing and catching, he remained unconscious for a while and served as a mosquito magnet. About the point I was getting worried (he hadn't moved a muscle for an hour), he stirred and sat up, assessed the situation, and decided to head out. While there were still a lot more people here than I had hoped, I think this gentleman had absorbed all of the "that guy" karma for the area. Those that remained had a ball, we helped each other, and friends were made. Here we have an example of what is both bad and good about combat fishing.

    On another occasion while fishing for reds on the Kenai peninsula, I had to get stitches on my ear after being smashed in the head with a small log (not kidding). A father parked his young son (perhaps 8 years old?) in the tight space between my buddy and I. I saw what I thought was going to be some quality father/son time and perhaps some fishing lessons and awesome memories made. My buddy and I exchanged a smile and silently agreed to push to our respective sides as much as possible to give them room. The father then told his son to "do what everyone else was doing" and disappeared. The young boy was doing his best, but the rod was clearly too much for him to handle, and he had also not been taught how to operate in tight confines. After a few minutes, I looked around for the father (nowhere to be found) and decided I would offer assistance. Right as I made this determination, I took a blow to the side of the head. The boy was allowing his rod tip/weight/fly to hit the ground behind him on every flip...in a chance encounter with probability/physics, he had managed to hook a small log and fling it in the proper manner to tag me directly in the ear. I began to bleed immediately. The boy was horrified and ran off to find his dad. As I was applying direct pressure to stem the flow, the boy came back with his dad who assessed the situation, took a look at me, and told his son to be more careful...then departed without even a word of apology or more instruction for his son. The boy looked at me and then took off after his Dad. I was angry, to say the least, but not at the boy. My buddy wanted to take me to the hospital, but I told him I would go with my wife so he could stay to fish. We also agreed that he would help the boy if he decided to fish again. I left for medical attention, and my buddy later informed me that the boy did come back, wanted to apologize, and my friend talked him into fishing again. Under my friend's guidance he later caught what he said was his first salmon. A father takes his son salmon fishing and isn't even there for his son's first catch? I guess the lesson here is that those new to combat fishing will need some help and there's nothing wrong with taking care of your neighbor...don't wait too long to offer a friendly assist - you might end up with stitches.

    Lastly, I'll say this: whenever you go to a combat fishing location, take a trash bag with you. Last thing I do before retreating to the cleaning table is a police call around the area. I don't say anything, I just do it. This is kind of contagious, and on several occasions others stopped what they were doing to pitch in. Anything we can do to promote this behavior will help.

    --Chief
    "Live that the fear of death can never enter your heart. Show respect to all and grovel to none. Seek to make your life long and its purpose in the service of your people."

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    Hope I bump into more of "you guys" instead of "those guys"
    One week out and everything's looking good.

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