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Thread: Beam size and ride quality???

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    Member joebut1985's Avatar
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    Default Beam size and ride quality???

    Hello I am currently planning on my future boat and am wondering if there is a difference in ride quality, handling, fuel economy, etc. when going from a 8.5ft beam to either a 9.6 or larger specifically in larger seas. I know that every boat is designed differently, just curious that if the boat is wider the only thing that you are gaining is the extra space? thanks

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    Member Music Man's Avatar
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    Air ride seats will tame the waves!
    When seconds count, the cops are just minutes away.
    '08 24' HCM Granite HD "River Dog"

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    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
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    When you get wider it makes the boat harder to push so more HP is needed also more beam can get squirrely in following seas. Of course how much deadrise a hull has back there will effect how it sits on the drift, more V = more roll. Don't forget about the tunnel Nazi's charging a mere 300 bucks to go through the tube if your over 10' !!

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    While this is true, I've been in some really nice looking, expensive boats, that will slap the heck out of you in a two foot chop. I have only some little spring brackets under the seats in my 2284 Raider and unless I'm in something I'd rather not be, $2k in seats are not required due to the hull design......will get right on top of that two foot chop and run 26 knots with a drink in my hand.

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    When things start getting choppy, deadrise in the bow and stern will say a lot about how roughly you ride. There's a relationship to beam, but wider won't make things any smoother without plenty of deadrise, especially up front. Basically little deadrise in a wider boat means a pretty flat bottom and kidneys settling into your ankles. Lots of deadrise ("deep vee") fights that nicely.

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    Member JR2's Avatar
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    I know a 9'6" boat feels more stable than a 8 ft wide boat... and there is lots more room.. My next one will be 9.99 ft wide and hopefully 35 ft long....
    2007 Kingfisher 2825 - Stor Fisk

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    10x35 is a pretty skinny boat but i know the reason for it.

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    I like the room you get out of a 9'6 or bigger especially inside of the cab. Thanks for all the replies. From my understanding if I do decide on a boat 9'6 or larger than the deadrise plays a major role in how well it will ride in rough seas, along with a good pair of suspension seats. I think that the ideal boat size for me and my needs right now are somewhere around 28' to 30' or at least that's what I think I need. Thanks once again.

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    Quote Originally Posted by potbuilder View Post
    10x35 is a pretty skinny boat but i know the reason for it.
    That's alot like all the boats running around rated for 150+ hp with only a 50hp hanging on the back of them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by joebut1985 View Post
    I like the room you get out of a 9'6 or bigger especially inside of the cab. Thanks for all the replies. From my understanding if I do decide on a boat 9'6 or larger than the deadrise plays a major role in how well it will ride in rough seas, along with a good pair of suspension seats. I think that the ideal boat size for me and my needs right now are somewhere around 28' to 30' or at least that's what I think I need. Thanks once again.
    If ya need suspension seats then it ain't a good riding boat ! at least not in the weather we get around here.

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    Agree with Potbuilder. The owner's forum for my last boat had a survey on the best modification and the most popular one was air ride seats! And this is a very popular and well regarded boat for ride, but not by my experience. My current boat owner's forum has no mention of the need for air ride seats. The ride is much better though speed (I now cruise at 21 kts down from 27 kts though a ton more boat), a straight drive with engine (weight/c.g.) forward as well as deadrise has a lot to do with how well it handles the chop. Put all the weight on the transom, try to go 25-30 kts in a chop with a relatively flat bottom small boat and you're going to need a chiropractor.

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    Couple other things to consider when talking beam.

    The taller the boat design is the higher the center of gravity so a wider beam will make the boat more stable just based on center of gravity - all things being equal.

    Next - the difference between 9'6" beam and 10' beam is not just 6 inches. BW builds a 9'6" beam hull and a 10' beam hull. The 10' beam design has a 1'5" more bow height, 10" to a foot higher sides (measured from the outside of the boat) and a wider bottom (outside edge of chine to outside edge of chine).

    Custom builders will take a 9'6" beam and lay it out to 9'9" to get more width for cabin layout but that in effect lowers the side height, lowers the bow height, but the boat maintains the same bottom width since the sides are layed open or widened from the chine out. Getting a 10' wide beam allows you to get the extra cabin width but maintain more vertical sides as the sides come up from the chine which makes the sides higher and the bow taller meauring from the water. Inside width gunnel to gunnel is a function of how high or low the builder places the deck inside the hull. The higher the deck the wider the floor space. The lower the deck inside the hull the smaller the width. The higher the deck the higher everything is above the center line - all trade-offs. This mainly applies to custom builds

    Duckworth, Hewes, Weldcraft, Kingfisher have their designs laid out the way they want so in that scenario I'd get the widest beam possible which is usually paired with a set length by the manufacturer.

    If you're planning a custom build then you get to make all the decisions as mentioned above. With regards to BW, they have a standard sportfishing/recreational hull and cabin design that they will not deviate from, but length, beam, cabin location, floor height, fishing deck layout, cabin layout, fuel capacity, power, etc. are all customizable.

    The short answer is that IMO going from 8'6" to 9'6" or 10' is not just gaining a few inches wider cabin space. You will have a bigger boat in many measurable areas. Figuring out the right combination of lenght to beam, and cabin height to beam, cabin location on deck, deadrise at bow, deadrise at transom is another set of variables.

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    Member joebut1985's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by potbuilder View Post
    If ya need suspension seats then it ain't a good riding boat ! at least not in the weather we get around here.
    Thanks Steve, I guess that's a good way to look at it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 1S1K View Post
    Couple other things to consider when talking beam.

    The taller the boat design is the higher the center of gravity so a wider beam will make the boat more stable just based on center of gravity - all things being equal.

    Next - the difference between 9'6" beam and 10' beam is not just 6 inches. BW builds a 9'6" beam hull and a 10' beam hull. The 10' beam design has a 1'5" more bow height, 10" to a foot higher sides (measured from the outside of the boat) and a wider bottom (outside edge of chine to outside edge of chine).

    Custom builders will take a 9'6" beam and lay it out to 9'9" to get more width for cabin layout but that in effect lowers the side height, lowers the bow height, but the boat maintains the same bottom width since the sides are layed open or widened from the chine out. Getting a 10' wide beam allows you to get the extra cabin width but maintain more vertical sides as the sides come up from the chine which makes the sides higher and the bow taller meauring from the water. Inside width gunnel to gunnel is a function of how high or low the builder places the deck inside the hull. The higher the deck the wider the floor space. The lower the deck inside the hull the smaller the width. The higher the deck the higher everything is above the center line - all trade-offs. This mainly applies to custom builds

    Duckworth, Hewes, Weldcraft, Kingfisher have their designs laid out the way they want so in that scenario I'd get the widest beam possible which is usually paired with a set length by the manufacturer.

    If you're planning a custom build then you get to make all the decisions as mentioned above. With regards to BW, they have a standard sportfishing/recreational hull and cabin design that they will not deviate from, but length, beam, cabin location, floor height, fishing deck layout, cabin layout, fuel capacity, power, etc. are all customizable.

    The short answer is that IMO going from 8'6" to 9'6" or 10' is not just gaining a few inches wider cabin space. You will have a bigger boat in many measurable areas. Figuring out the right combination of lenght to beam, and cabin height to beam, cabin location on deck, deadrise at bow, deadrise at transom is another set of variables.
    Thanks 1S1K for the detailed reply. That was a lot of helpful information.

    Out of all the non custom boats kingfisher is the only one that I can find that offers a 28' boat with something larger than 8.5 beam. I have also been looking at a lot of the custom builders as well. I was just unsure about the beam size and how or if that affected anything.

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    Member JR2's Avatar
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    If you are interested here is a thread on another forum with probably more info than you can ingest in one sitting http://aluminumalloyboats.com/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=4364

    If you want to look around a Kingfisher give me a shout, I have one and would be more than happy to let you crawl all over it. I can also share my likes and dislikes.

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    Wooldridge's 29ft Super Sport Offshore Pilothouse has a 9'6" beam with a 96" bottom width.

    http://www.wooldridgeboats.com/catal...ore-pilothouse

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    Member akdeweyj's Avatar
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    North River Offshore doesn't make a 28 ft but 27ft = 8'6" beam & 29ft = 9'6" beam.
    2007 24ft NorthRiver OS
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    Member joebut1985's Avatar
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    Thanks for the input on those boats. I looked at the Wooldridge and the performance numbers looked almost to good to be true, but the boat was lighter than most others. I will also look at the north rivers.

  19. #19

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    Thunder Jet's offshore 28' is a 9' beam. You can get a 30 footer from them with a 10' beam as well. Pretty good looking boats!

  20. #20

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    My 28' Armstrong monohull is 9'6".

    I am down in Seattle, so it makes sense. After seeing the Bayweld build, I wish I could,have borrowed some of their ideas. I am very happy with my boat. Bayweld builds a more "finished" boat.

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