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Thread: Anyone fish with a switch rod?

  1. #1
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    Default Anyone fish with a switch rod?

    Looking into picking one up. I have fished with Spey rods for a long time now and feel like a lot of the water in AK doesnt need a full spey. Looking at a good mix between SH and DH rods. Mainly for chrome domes, big bows and silvers.

    Do you think Switch rods bridge the gap or are like "all season tires" that arent really good in any season... Thanks

  2. #2

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    I own three switch rods, all 11 footers, 6, 7, & 8 WTS. They are not a cure all thing, but have some great applications. I mainly use them for indicator applications. Also very valuable for high sticking applications, where a full spey is way too heavy. Armed with Airflo's Speydicators lines they are incredible dead drifting machines, where I can easily get 50'-75' dead drifts. If I'm swinging flies, I prefer spey rods. The 6 WT gets a lot of use on the Kenai for big trout/dollies during the egg drop, and the 8 WT gets a lot of use on a bunch of KP rivers for silvers and chrome. Don't actually use the 7 WT all that much, because the 6 WT has landed fish up to 15 pounds. Don't fish kings at all, so no experience there. I do recommend switch rods for experienced fly anglers who know what they are doing and want to expand their horizons, but I'm not sure of their value for rookies, since they take a bit of skill to use.

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    I have a 2,3,4,5,6,8 SH and a 9,10 Spey. The Speys are all Loop while the SH are a mix. I liked the feel of the Loop switch. Ive ran both Skagit and Scandi. I have a lot of rods, but not sure if the switch will be worth it.

    How does the shorter 10'7" roll compared to a full 13'. Im assuming the longer application while utilizing its SH ability is great for weighted nymph set ups?

    Quote Originally Posted by NorcalBob View Post
    I own three switch rods, all 11 footers, 6, 7, & 8 WTS. They are not a cure all thing, but have some great applications. I mainly use them for indicator applications. Also very valuable for high sticking applications, where a full spey is way too heavy. Armed with Airflo's Speydicators lines they are incredible dead drifting machines, where I can easily get 50'-75' dead drifts. If I'm swinging flies, I prefer spey rods. The 6 WT gets a lot of use on the Kenai for big trout/dollies during the egg drop, and the 8 WT gets a lot of use on a bunch of KP rivers for silvers and chrome. Don't actually use the 7 WT all that much, because the 6 WT has landed fish up to 15 pounds. Don't fish kings at all, so no experience there. I do recommend switch rods for experienced fly anglers who know what they are doing and want to expand their horizons, but I'm not sure of their value for rookies, since they take a bit of skill to use.

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    I fish switch rods almost exlusivly for everything from kings to trout. They have an application in just about every piece of water in alaska and are far more veritle than spey rods IMO. Once you commit to switch rods prepare for your single handers to collect a lot of dust . I really only break my spey rods out on the Kenai and even then a switch rod of the approperiate length and action is just as capable on big water. If you are looking for a switch rod i would recomend a 7wt 11'+. this will tackle trout and salmon (execpt kings). In my experience utilizing a switch rod for a SH is not fun and and very cumbersome. a shorter switch (10'6") can work as a SH in a pinch, but it wouldnt be much fun. Talk with Mike or Brian at Mossy's, they are far more knowlegble than I and have all the spey gear you will ever need in stock.

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    they are great. i fish my 11'3 7wt alot for trout and silvers. does not quite bridge the gap all the way, but with some shorter compact heads can fish some of the smaller water that your spey is to big for. i almost never use mine as a SH its just so much better casting it two handed.

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    Thanks for all the info! Hows does it feel flinging eggs or nymphs on indicators?

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    If you want to nymph under an indicator with a switch rod primarily roll or over head casting, get the original rio switch line (not the switch chucker). I prefer this to the speydicator for a couple reasons. First being the color of the speydicator as I'm not a huge fan of neon colored line. Second is the speydicator is very stretchy. Too stretchy imo. The rio switch chucker line is great too although it doesn't mend well and is better suited for attaching a sink tip and swinging, casting skagit style.
    "The North wind is cold no matter what direction it's blowing"

  8. #8

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    My wife bought be a Redington Dually switch rod last June on Father's day. I have never owned a "true" spey rod or Skagit rod. But I really like my Redington Dually. A great good for the money rod in my opinion. But that's coming from a guy who has done very little spey fishing so take it for what it's worth. Good luck.

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    The big thing about a switch rod is the versatility. The problem is not really the rod. It is how you are wanting to fish it. If you are wanting to swing exclusively, then you will be looking at loading up your reel with a Scandi, or Skagit line (depending on your fly size, if you are using MOW tips, and casting style). If you are wanting to indicator fish, then go with a RIO Switch line, Speydicator, or you could over line a DT line by two sizes (if you can find it). If you want to be able to do both, then the best thing would be to have multiple spools/reels for different setups.

    Another option is used by many on switch rods (myself included) are the RIO Outbound Short, or Wolf Ambush triangle taper. Both of these lines have a very heavy shooting head that can cast versi/poly leaders very well, transition from overhand to spey casts very easily, and since the head and running line are one piece, you can mend the line to allow for some decent dead drifts with an indicator. Again, the main recommendation is to over line these two by two sizes.

    Check out Red's Fly shop on Youtube, or email them. They are super helpful with any question you may have! Mike at Mossy's has already been mentioned, but I will second his recommendation. Having someone local, is always a plus!

    AKTroutGuy

  10. #10
    Member icb12's Avatar
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    Anything I can do with one hand I can do better with two.


    I have several switches, that do all sorts of fun things. Yes I chuck bobbers and lead with them too. Its fine. The right line helps, but it will get out there one way or another.

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