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Thread: News from Whittier

  1. #1
    Sponsor offshore's Avatar
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    Default News from Whittier

    After a long string of early season trips beginning in early April, we can say that the fishing is very good on all fronts. There seems to be a good number of nice halibut in that perfect size class, not to mention a bunch that are larger. We're also finding plenty of shrimp and rockfish. A couple of highlight pics include a rare red-banded rockfish, the big one of the season, so far, and a new newsletter from the harbormaster.
    IMG_1326.jpgIMG_1335.jpg


    http://whittieralaska.gov/WBH/May%202015.pdf

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    Yuk, more parking meters! Nice fish though


    Quote Originally Posted by offshore View Post
    After a long string of early season trips beginning in early April, we can say that the fishing is very good on all fronts. There seems to be a good number of nice halibut in that perfect size class, not to mention a bunch that are larger. We're also finding plenty of shrimp and rockfish. A couple of highlight pics include a rare red-banded rockfish, the big one of the season, so far, and a new newsletter from the harbormaster.
    IMG_1326.jpgIMG_1335.jpg


    http://whittieralaska.gov/WBH/May%202015.pdf

  3. #3
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    We catch several of the tiger yelloweyes every year - but that is a good sized one. How'd the butt eat - too big for my liking. Not that I haven't shot some big ole gals, but I won't do it any more. I like the 25-40 pounders for eating - - now if I could just find a couple....

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    Sponsor offshore's Avatar
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    I like 30s myself too, but if you only have a day to fish, that's the way to do it. They chose to keep that one. We've let go most of the 200+ fish we've seen in the past few years. Public perception is changing for sure. That's actually a red banded rockfish- different from the tiger.

  5. #5
    Member 0321Tony's Avatar
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    I need to learn where to fish Whittier we always go for the shrimp but it would be nice to find some butt to go along with it. I do my halibut fishing in Homer but as I explore the sound more and more I'll find a few spots. Love it there it's a beautiful place, I love fishing Seward but Whittier has the scenery for sure

  6. #6
    Sponsor offshore's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 0321Tony View Post
    I need to learn where to fish Whittier we always go for the shrimp but it would be nice to find some butt to go along with it. I do my halibut fishing in Homer but as I explore the sound more and more I'll find a few spots. Love it there it's a beautiful place, I love fishing Seward but Whittier has the scenery for sure
    The northern Sound is different. I fished Anchor Point last month in an 18'er and was back to Soldotna with a limit in time to meet my son at the bus stop. You simply can't do that in Whittier. It's intuitive if you look at differences between PWS and Cook Inlet and the Gulf. There are lots of fish in the northern Sound, but you need time, patience, knowledge, and a whole lot of fuel ,if that doesn't work, to get them everyday. If you're in a small boat and your head will explode if you don't get a limit of halibut, head to the Inlet. If you have patience and are willing to work, throw some shrimp pots and enjoy the Sound. Things change when you get south, but it still isn't easy.

  7. #7
    Member 0321Tony's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by offshore View Post
    The northern Sound is different. I fished Anchor Point last month in an 18'er and was back to Soldotna with a limit in time to meet my son at the bus stop. You simply can't do that in Whittier. It's intuitive if you look at differences between PWS and Cook Inlet and the Gulf. There are lots of fish in the northern Sound, but you need time, patience, knowledge, and a whole lot of fuel ,if that doesn't work, to get them everyday. If you're in a small boat and your head will explode if you don't get a limit of halibut, head to the Inlet. If you have patience and are willing to work, throw some shrimp pots and enjoy the Sound. Things change when you get south, but it still isn't easy.
    My house sits almost smack dab in between Homer, Whittier, and Seward so its not so bad if I don't catch anything in Whittier. Honestly I don't give it much of a chance but occasionally drop a line. We use Whittier for the shrimp and shore time, Seward for the rockfish and Homer for the halibut... I'll be headed to Homer next week unless it's calling for clear skies and flat water then we'll be Whittier bound.

    It is strange to me that there are so few rockfish around the northern sound, the bottom looks very similar to Seward and there would be fish everywhere. It amazes me every time how void of fish it is up there.

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