Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Hot air exchange, from ceiling to the crawl-space.......HOW....???

  1. #1

    Default Hot air exchange, from ceiling to the crawl-space.......HOW....???

    I want to push heat from the cabin ceiling down to the crawlspace. I figure to use 2" PVC pipe. I am looking for ideas on a small fan. Would be super nice if it could be triggered by a thermostat type thingie if the crawlspace dropped below 40 degrees.

    Any ideas......or if you can point me in the right direction.

  2. #2
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,749

    Default

    If you really want to do this and don't care about aesthetics, if it were me I'd probably use something more like an insulated 6" duct. Plus I would probably put the fan down in the crawl space in the reverse direction which would pull the air down rather than push it. For the same reason that ceiling fans have forward and reverse.....in the summer you want to cool the air so you leave it in the forward position and push it down, which tends to cool it more. In the winter a ceiling fan in reverse pulls the cooler air up from the floor and mixes it with the air in the ceiling.

    I think if you go with a small diameter pipe you would tend to cool the air too much before it gets down into the crawl space. You could try it, but either way I would use a slow speed fan, or a fan that you could adjust the speed, or the amount of air that it moves. Again, it's very easy to cool the air if you don't watch out.

    Don't you heat with a wood stove? Having a welder install a pipe inside the fire box and putting an inline fan inside it, and then down into your crawlspace I would think would be a better option...???

    Just some things to think about.....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    wasilla
    Posts
    788

    Default

    2'' pipe will not give you enough volume to make a difference and will over work any motor you put on it.. A 6'' pipe would be better but again you will not see a large rise in temp down there. The next issue will be how tight (sealed ) your crawler is? You would want it a bit leaky down there so it would not force that air back into the house. There are invent fans with a temp relay switch available generally in 6' and 8' but the question would be what is the temperature that trips the switch to tune the fan on.

    Sweepint
    Wasilla, (when not overseas)
    '' Livn' The Dream ''
    26' Hewescraft Cuddy, twin 115 Yam

  4. #4
    Member cod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Ak.
    Posts
    2,214

    Default

    I have an interesting proposition that I used to heat my crawl space at my last place but won't elaborate now but instead, for now, would like to ask a couple quik questions. What is your current heating source/ method-?---and what is your objective in the crawl space?
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!

  5. #5

    Default

    The objective is to keep the water supply from the well and/or the waste water from the toilet from freezing. Heat will be stove oil Toyo space heater.

    Quote Originally Posted by cod View Post
    I have an interesting proposition that I used to heat my crawl space at my last place but won't elaborate now but instead, for now, would like to ask a couple quik questions. What is your current heating source/ method-?---and what is your objective in the crawl space?

  6. #6
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,749

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    The objective is to keep the water supply from the well and/or the waste water from the toilet from freezing. Heat will be stove oil Toyo space heater.
    For years I heated with only wood, but then I went to a Toyo. I never did it, but for years I thought of finding a way to tap into the exhaust system of the Toyo (same basic idea as I mentioned above with the wood stove) to heat some air into the crawlspace. It would be nice to utilize the heat off that exhaust pipe in some way.

    I had my pressure tank and water line under the house in the crawl space. I insulated the skirting with 2" blue board and wrapped my waterline with pipe insulation and rarely had any freezing problems for years. It stayed warm enough under there just from the heat from the house, probably due to only having 2x6 joists and R19 insulation in the floor. And I'm pretty sure it would get a bit colder in that sinkhole I used to live in in Kasilof than it gets in Hope....especially nowadays. I also installed vents in the skirting that I could close off and insulate during the winter and open up in the summer.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  7. #7
    Member cod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Ak.
    Posts
    2,214

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    The objective is to keep the water supply from the well and/or the waste water from the toilet from freezing. Heat will be stove oil Toyo space heater.
    Roger that.
    OK. That allows me to elaborate. Had a former house I got for cheap. It was a 900 plus sq ft old mess w crawl space below. Poorly insulated and energy hog. Large forced air furnace in crawl space. Long story short.... Pulled out forced air ducts and furnace below, dug out 10 x 10 x 2 ft pit in crawl space (to accomidate recommended overhead clearance) for insertion of Toyo 56 model to heat not only crawl space, but entire living area above. In floor heat, so to speak. I left the existing duct floor vents in place from the old forced air furnace, and allowed the warm air to emminate thru the old vents.
    On this house the crawl space was about 12 inches above the outside ground level. This allowed the necessary outside the house area to vent the 'periscope' Toyo exhaust pipe attached to the stove in the crawl space below to be vented to the outside.
    My crawl space had some fuel oil problems from former spills-leaks-maintenance issues and I had done my best to remove as much obvious bad soil as I could, however I still endured some fuel oil smells for a couple months in the home. But as the crawl space eventually dried out, the crawl space and home became very stable.
    I pretty much rebuilt this home while we lived in it for 4 yrs and sold it for a tidy profit later.
    If you are currently using the Toyo in the living area, you would be also clearing up usable floor space in your living area. I put my short stubby hot water heater below also. I bought spare Toyo and water heater and set the new boxed ones next to the ones being used right next to each other in case of failure later. That way it would be easy switch over and had identical replacements w/o much hassle.
    Cheers. cod
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!

  8. #8

    Default

    Thanks.............

    Quote Originally Posted by cod View Post
    Roger that.
    OK. That allows me to elaborate. Had a former house I got for cheap. It was a 900 plus sq ft old mess w crawl space below. Poorly insulated and energy hog. Large forced air furnace in crawl space. Long story short.... Pulled out forced air ducts and furnace below, dug out 10 x 10 x 2 ft pit in crawl space (to accomidate recommended overhead clearance) for insertion of Toyo 56 model to heat not only crawl space, but entire living area above. In floor heat, so to speak. I left the existing duct floor vents in place from the old forced air furnace, and allowed the warm air to emminate thru the old vents.
    On this house the crawl space was about 12 inches above the outside ground level. This allowed the necessary outside the house area to vent the 'periscope' Toyo exhaust pipe attached to the stove in the crawl space below to be vented to the outside.
    My crawl space had some fuel oil problems from former spills-leaks-maintenance issues and I had done my best to remove as much obvious bad soil as I could, however I still endured some fuel oil smells for a couple months in the home. But as the crawl space eventually dried out, the crawl space and home became very stable.
    I pretty much rebuilt this home while we lived in it for 4 yrs and sold it for a tidy profit later.
    If you are currently using the Toyo in the living area, you would be also clearing up usable floor space in your living area. I put my short stubby hot water heater below also. I bought spare Toyo and water heater and set the new boxed ones next to the ones being used right next to each other in case of failure later. That way it would be easy switch over and had identical replacements w/o much hassle.
    Cheers. cod

  9. #9
    Member cod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Ak.
    Posts
    2,214

    Default

    Another benefit of this method I found was when the power went out, the crawl space heat, because it has the entire ground area super heated, keeps emminating heat for quite some time. It also keeps the snow away from your homes ouside walls for a foot or so. (Which was good because I didn't have to worry about snow covering my exaust port that was only 6-10 inches from ground level.
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!

  10. #10
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,749

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cod View Post
    Roger that.
    OK. That allows me to elaborate. Had a former house I got for cheap. It was a 900 plus sq ft old mess w crawl space below. Poorly insulated and energy hog. Large forced air furnace in crawl space. Long story short.... Pulled out forced air ducts and furnace below, dug out 10 x 10 x 2 ft pit in crawl space (to accomidate recommended overhead clearance) for insertion of Toyo 56 model to heat not only crawl space, but entire living area above. In floor heat, so to speak. I left the existing duct floor vents in place from the old forced air furnace, and allowed the warm air to emminate thru the old vents.
    On this house the crawl space was about 12 inches above the outside ground level. This allowed the necessary outside the house area to vent the 'periscope' Toyo exhaust pipe attached to the stove in the crawl space below to be vented to the outside.
    My crawl space had some fuel oil problems from former spills-leaks-maintenance issues and I had done my best to remove as much obvious bad soil as I could, however I still endured some fuel oil smells for a couple months in the home. But as the crawl space eventually dried out, the crawl space and home became very stable.
    I pretty much rebuilt this home while we lived in it for 4 yrs and sold it for a tidy profit later.
    If you are currently using the Toyo in the living area, you would be also clearing up usable floor space in your living area. I put my short stubby hot water heater below also. I bought spare Toyo and water heater and set the new boxed ones next to the ones being used right next to each other in case of failure later. That way it would be easy switch over and had identical replacements w/o much hassle.
    Cheers. cod
    I actually was going to suggest putting a small Laser 30 in the craw space in addition to the Toyo in the house. But I know AGL is on a fixed income and is probably trying to do something on the cheap. I had a Laser 30 in my 16x24 shop that was a really nice little unit...... The more you heat the crawl space (floor) the less his Toyo in the cabin will need to work....

    Like minds.......lol.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  11. #11
    Member cod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Ak.
    Posts
    2,214

    Default

    I might add, for someone contemplating this idea, I looked into remote control for the temperature settings on the Toyo. Unfortunately, in 2003 that technology was not available on the Toyos. I do not know if it is available now or not. I solved the temperature control by running the thermostat wire with sensor up thru a hole in the floor I drilled. If I recall the sensor wire was about ten ft long and I hung it on the living quarters wall where I could station it at the height I felt appropriate. Set the temp setting on Toyo about 69-70 degrees.
    This set up creates a situation whereby the crawl space WILL be much warmer than the living area, as the Toyo gets its direction to heat (obviously) from the thermostat above . Not to say that the Toyo will run excessively. Just that the heat transfer is slower to take place from below to the above quarters. Like in winter, when a blast of cold air comes thru the open doorway, there was no instant warm air blast that formerly would be felt from the forced air furnace.
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •