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Thread: Fish id?

  1. #1
    Member scott_rn's Avatar
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    Default Fish id?


    Flounder?
    Edible?
    Thanks
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  2. #2
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Arrowtooth flounder. Technically edible, yes, but... The meat turns to mush upon cooking - think oatmeal with way too much water in it. All manner of things have been tried to address this without success. It's the number one fish by biomass in the Gulf of Alaska, but it has basically zero value. As I understand it, WalMart carried it for a while, but nobody would buy it twice.

    It does, however, make pretty decent halibut bait.

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    the "mush meat" of the arrow tooth can be filleted, blended raw into a food processor, and then be combined with raw egg, fine chopped onion and celery, thickened with bread crumbs, and then formed into fish balls; drop in boiling water, wait till they rise, shut off element, and then cover and allow to cool; drain, pack in chicken stock, and store in a covered jar in the refrigerator; the final product will keep two weeks and can be used as a cold appetizer with horseradish, warmed direct as a soup, or can be served over pasta with any white or red sauce

    "mush meat"; don't fight it, enhance it and enjoy it...

    Rosenberg; Bellevue, WA.
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    I've often wondered how Arrowtooth ceviche would turn out. The enzyme that turns the meat mushy activates when heat is applied. I'd definitely freeze the fish first to kill worms.

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    Sounds like something worth trying. Fish patties or the like sounds good to me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bernard R. Rosenberg View Post
    the "mush meat" of the arrow tooth can be filleted, blended raw into a food processor, and then be combined with raw egg, fine chopped onion and celery, thickened with bread crumbs, and then formed into fish balls; drop in boiling water, wait till they rise, shut off element, and then cover and allow to cool; drain, pack in chicken stock, and store in a covered jar in the refrigerator; the final product will keep two weeks and can be used as a cold appetizer with horseradish, warmed direct as a soup, or can be served over pasta with any white or red sauce

    "mush meat"; don't fight it, enhance it and enjoy it...

    Rosenberg; Bellevue, WA.

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    Member carolinaboy's Avatar
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    Gee....sure is sounding like a flat carp to me. You catch it, fillet it, season it, grill it on a cedar plank, scrape off the fish, EAT the plank.

    Use it as bait to catch a Halibut or toss it back.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bernard R. Rosenberg View Post
    the "mush meat" of the arrow tooth can be filleted, blended raw into a food processor, and then be combined with raw egg, fine chopped onion and celery, thickened with bread crumbs, and then formed into fish balls; drop in boiling water, wait till they rise, shut off element, and then cover and allow to cool; drain, pack in chicken stock, and store in a covered jar in the refrigerator; the final product will keep two weeks and can be used as a cold appetizer with horseradish, warmed direct as a soup, or can be served over pasta with any white or red sauce

    "mush meat"; don't fight it, enhance it and enjoy it...

    Rosenberg; Bellevue, WA.

    Really, why bother. Throw it back and catch something worth eating.
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    Quote Originally Posted by homerdave View Post
    Really, why bother. Throw it back and catch something worth eating.
    That's exactly what I was thinking. That's a lot of work to make something edible, and still doesn't sound too appetizing
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    Quote Originally Posted by hoose35 View Post
    That's exactly what I was thinking. That's a lot of work to make something edible, and still doesn't sound too appetizing
    Bernard posted a simple recipe for fish balls. Some recipes are much more complicated and even more work. The process is the same (a fair bit of work) weather or not you are using arrowtooth.

    This suggests a potential market, but probably not a very lucrative one: catch a bazillion pounds of arrowtooth, process them onboard, and ship cans or frozen blocks of fish paste to Asia. Somebody might also be interested in the roe; I have several friends that like fried halibut roe.

    Big_E

  10. #10

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    Anyone know what this is?
    Sorry...bad picture. Caught @ 500 + ft. Color similar to that of a dusky rockfish. non segmented long dorasl and one just like it on belly side that starts just past the pectorials. mouth full of very small, but sharp teeth. Looked like dinner to me...so I munched it and it was very good. Nice thick filets were white with slight pinkish tinge. Don't know what it is but I'd like a thirty lb. copy.

  11. #11
    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    Ronquil. Probably yellowfin.
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    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by homerdave View Post
    Really, why bother. Throw it back and catch something worth eating.
    Fillet it and put it on a 18/0 circle hook and drop to the bottom.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by homerdave View Post
    Ronquil. Probably yellowfin.
    Thanks, Dave. Found Ronquil pics on the net that look a lot like it. Odd though, mine was just under 15" and the info on them says they only get to 10" long. Guess I can forget about a 30 lb. version.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Garyak View Post
    Thanks, Dave. Found Ronquil pics on the net that look a lot like it. Odd though, mine was just under 15" and the info on them says they only get to 10" long. Guess I can forget about a 30 lb. version.
    So how did that world record taste?


  15. #15
    Member FishGod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garyak View Post
    Anyone know what this is?
    Sorry...bad picture. Caught @ 500 + ft. Color similar to that of a dusky rockfish. non segmented long dorasl and one just like it on belly side that starts just past the pectorials. mouth full of very small, but sharp teeth. Looked like dinner to me...so I munched it and it was very good. Nice thick filets were white with slight pinkish tinge. Don't know what it is but I'd like a thirty lb. copy.
    It looks to be either a northern ronquil or a searcher. It would be nice to clearly see the anterior portion of the dorasl to see if a black patch is present. The bands look rather large suggesting it's a searcher. Although, it looks like there may be stripes near the eye suggesting northern ronquil. Again, a better, close up picture would make identification a lot easier.
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  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Zeek View Post
    So how did that world record taste?

    Ha, Ha...I was thinking the same thing. Probably tasted better than the plastic plaque that would have said I caught a world record would have. I saw the ronquils in my fish book before I posted and dismissed them because the fish I caught was so much larger than the ones listed. Homerdave said yellowfin ronquil, but I couldn't find a listing for them.

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by FishGod View Post
    It looks to be either a northern ronquil or a searcher. It would be nice to clearly see the anterior portion of the dorasl to see if a black patch is present. The bands look rather large suggesting it's a searcher. Although, it looks like there may be stripes near the eye suggesting northern ronquil. Again, a better, close up picture would make identification a lot easier.
    The picture looked ok in the camera but my boat was pitching all over the place so I wanted to spend as little time on my feet as possible. Very disappointed when I put it on the computer. Caught at 500+ ft. so that suggests searcher as opposed to ronquil. But searchers are only supposed to get to 1 ft. in length.

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