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Thread: Copper River Rocks

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    Member mntransplant's Avatar
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    Default Copper River Rocks

    I love dipping the Copper River even though it's pretty dangerous (relatively speaking). I have always wondered if it was possible to put an anchor of some sorts into the rocks to tie yourself off on. Just like the rock climbers do when they climb. I was thinking of putting a few in that stay there permanently so everyone could use it. I know nothing of how these work or even what type of rock we fish from (north bank). Any ideas or inputs as to the good/bad of this? I'm not doing it for sure, but I have been thinking of it.
    -At what point does "against all enemies foreign and domestic" apply to politicians?

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    It certainly is possible to place such anchors but you really need to have knowledge of rocks and placing anchors before doing so willy nilly. I've been climbing for ~30 years and without a working knowledge of anchors and rocks you and easily install something that looks perfectly good but wouldn't even hold your body weight let alone arrest a fall or in the case of the copper a dunking. When installing a permanent anchor you need to consider not only how it will perform when you install it, but the affects of weathering on the anchor and the rock.

    Here is my current setup for placing permanent anchors



    A little bit of overkill is good when you factor in questionable rock and the affects of weathering and corosion which is why I prefer to use 1/2" anchors.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

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    There are usually trees or stout bushes to tie off to. Otherwise, bring some climbing chocks to place in some cracks. You could go as far as placing pitons, but you'll only be fishing for a few hours or a couple days, so there is no need to drill to place a permanent anchor.

    Also wear a life jacket.

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    better to be safe than sorry an use a fair size boat don't want to tip over for any reason there , an use a good anchor to be safe
    SID

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKChester View Post
    There are usually trees or stout bushes to tie off to. Otherwise, bring some climbing chocks to place in some cracks. You could go as far as placing pitons, but you'll only be fishing for a few hours or a couple days, so there is no need to drill to place a permanent anchor.

    Also wear a life jacket.
    If one has no experience setting anchors, then the suggestion to place a few chocks is IMHO ill advised. Chocks can blow out of soft rock and or walk out of placements fairly easily and thats something you only learn by having placed cleaned them repeatedly on different types of rocks. Not to mention if you don't already have a rack and don't know the exact size of the cracks you're looking at several hundred dollars to get a set of chocks to cover various size cracks.

    I'm not advising placing bolts perse but often the only choice in crappy rock is big bolts and while it's been quite a few years since I dipped the Copper as I recall the rock was fairly crumbly shale and or sandstone. I was just trying to point out that to properly set an anchora requires a combination of the the right knowledge, skills and equipment or else you'll end up with what I refer to as triple P, purely psychological protection.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    1/2"x6" tapcons should hold up a few hundred pounds or so
    work great in granite & other hard rock

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    Member mntransplant's Avatar
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    Definitely a few great points made here. The area i dip only has one tree and bare rock for a pretty big area so tying off (which I usually do along with wearing a life jacket) but an extremely long rope is needed and gets to be a tripping hazard when putting fish on the stringer. My buddy is a climbing guy so maybe I'll ask him to come along this summer and see what he thinks. If I find a good clever way to make it happen I'll put a picture and description on for all to see. Thank you all for your inputs, I appreciate it.
    -At what point does "against all enemies foreign and domestic" apply to politicians?

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    I think it's a great idea! My father placed permanent anchors on the Rogue River below Copper Canyon and above Clay Hill 40 or 50 years ago for sturgeon and they are still there and get used.
    Hike faster. I hear banjo music.

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    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    I'm with Paul on this one. No problem at all with placing permanent anchors, if you know what you're doing. But I would be very hesitant to use an anchor someone else placed, because I know nothing about it. How deep is it imbedded in the rock? What kind of rock is it? Will it pull out when I really need it? No way to answer all of these questions, and I would hate to read of yet another dipnetter that traded his life for a few fish, simply because he trusted the work of a complete stranger.

    The Copper River is one of the most dangerous road-accessible places in Alaska. It's a pretty safe bet that as you read these words from the comfort of your home, some young man or woman who is alive and breathing today, enjoying life, dreaming the same dreams you and I dream about the future, loving his family... that person will be dead by the end of dipnetting season, buried under a load of glacial silt somewhere in the Copper River. We will talk about how foolish he was, and we will offer posthumous advice, but for him it will be too late. And it's a pretty safe bet that he thought it would never happen to him.

    Be safe. Come home to your family (they need you). Don't trade your life for a fish!

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    Member mntransplant's Avatar
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    Odd you say that because I would install an anchor as a safety device. I do however understand what you're saying.
    -At what point does "against all enemies foreign and domestic" apply to politicians?

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    I find it unbelievable, the number of dipnetters that do not tie off with a safety line, or use a life vest on the Copper River. I'll agree with Michael's post 100%
    "Grin and Bear It"

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tearbear View Post
    I find it unbelievable, the number of dipnetters that do not tie off with a safety line, or use a life vest on the Copper River. I'll agree with Michael's post 100%
    And all the other mistakes people make:

    1) No backup plan if they lose their net.
    2) No tools to repair a damaged net or pole.
    3) Not enough water to wash down the silt and sun
    4) Too much beer and not enough food

    etc.

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