Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 22

Thread: Hunting rituals, do you have any?

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    16

    Default Hunting rituals, do you have any?

    I am not a religious person but I believe that the game that is taken during my hunt should be honored is some way. I am trying to come up with a way to show the animal my appreciation in a respectful and dignified manner. Can anyone share any rituals or procedures that will help me start/continue something that has meaning? Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Member homerdave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    homer, alaska
    Posts
    3,922

    Default

    Really? You think I'm giving away my secrets?
    Raise black chickens, kill them at midnight and invoke Papa Legba....
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
    http://www.alaskabackcountryhunters.org/

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    JBER
    Posts
    31

    Default

    My tradition is to eat the heart of the animal I kill that night. More or less to capture that animals spirit and combine it with mine. I never leave a big game animals heart and have eaten many small game and bird hearts. Its a great tasting meat that I attribute to the soul and good will of the animal.

  4. #4
    Member outaMT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    MatSu
    Posts
    183

    Default

    Just give a quiet thanks to the Deity of meat for a successful harvest.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    NorthWest Alaska
    Posts
    3,639

    Default

    My only really noticeable way to evoke the spirits of animals to me , personally, is to have left the weapons at home, cause they always seem to know when Im unarmed, all running around, or flying low and slow, or just standing still at 50 yards for minutes at a time while I chop wood, walk along or such.....

    2 things I always start and end a Hunt with;

    I drink alotta water before I go out, its better to piss than be thirsty.

    I always say "Thank You." to any and all catch.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

  6. #6

    Default

    Family tradition: Always seem to have more success if the trip includes a lunch of deviled ham on Ritz crackers during the siesta period.

    Universal?: If there's an animal down: Look 'em in the eye and give thanks.

    Mine: A toast with Famous Grouse once the meat is back in camp.

  7. #7
    Member DanielApplin's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    344

    Default

    Be respectful by being a competent hunter. This will reduced suffering as much as possible and don't waste the meat, that is the only thing that has real meaning. Other than that i guess you can do whatever silly rituals anyone could think up....

  8. #8
    Member Roland on the River's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    1,690

    Default

    My hunting partner was German. Each time one of us bagged an animal he would cut a willow branch and put it in the animals mouth and neither one of us said a word but I know I closed my eyes and said a silent prayer thanking God for his bounty.

  9. #9

    Default

    Around my house we believe in Jesus. We always offer up prayers to the Creator thanking Him for His creation. Before we head out we pray for safety and ask for His blessings on the hunt and thank Him for it whether we make a gut pile or not. We stress the importance of this to our grand kids and trust them to carry on this "tradition".

  10. #10
    Sponsor Duckhunter01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Anchorage, Trapper Creek, Seward
    Posts
    1,799

    Default

    Thank the spirit of the animal harvested and pay respects, draw a circle of life, representing passing through, drink some blood or at least place on the face of the harvester and eat the heart of the animal that evening or at first family gathering afterwards. Dad was always serious about instilling the native American heritage....nice to be able to pass it on to my kids.
    President of Alaska Waterfowl Assoc.
    http://akwaterfowl.com
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Alask...78020265619952
    AlaskaWaterfowlAssociation@gmail.com
    Gen.1:26
    And God said, let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southwest Alaska
    Posts
    2,146

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by strangerinastrangeland View Post
    My only really noticeable way to evoke the spirits of animals to me , personally, is to have left the weapons at home, cause they always seem to know when Im unarmed, all running around, or flying low and slow, or just standing still at 50 yards for minutes at a time while I chop wood, walk along or such.....

    2 things I always start and end a Hunt with;

    I drink alotta water before I go out, its better to piss than be thirsty.

    I always say "Thank You." to any and all catch.
    Yup.........
    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence. Albert Einstein

    Better living through chemistry (I'm a chemist)

    You can piddle with the puppies, or run with the wolves...

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    JBER
    Posts
    31

    Default

    Sorry, I was invoking some of my best friend's beliefs and sarcasm when I said I eat the heart to combine its spirit with mine. However, every heart of the animal I kill and usually some tenderloin is my tradition to be eaten to celebrate the kill and sacrifice of the animal that night. I have laid down with several mule deer and antelope when I was young watching them breath their last breath and it's very humbling knowing I caused the mortal wound. It's a moment no one would forget, but I always appreciate my love for the outdoors with every animal I take. The chase is always greater than the kill. After the kill I make every point to process it myself and enjoy the blessings I have each time I can eat wild game. I apologize with my earlier statements but it is surreal and I love every moment of being in the last frontier.

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    16

    Default

    I appreciate everyone's input. I didn't want to do something that I find appropriate only to go out with someone else and get accused of being a weirdo or something. I had given thought to eating the heart or taking a small something from every bounty so I can bring them with me through my life travels.
    As a side note to the weird thing, I had a friend of mine that had family in town and his uncle has a bone tooth pick. I thought it was awesome until I found out it was the bone from the penis of a beaver. (Pretty sure it was a beaver or some other little furry creature.) But every time I watched him use the tooth pick, it made me giggle like a school girl.
    Again, thank you all for your advice and stories!

  14. #14
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction AK
    Posts
    4,057

    Default

    A lot of different cultures have various rituals regarding a successful hunt, some traditional and some spiritual/religious in nature. I always thought the German Jaegars had a pretty interesting cultural ritual...but it's theirs, not mine.

    Personally, I thank God for the success and show the animal all due respect through being as proficient in all aspects I can. A quick death with as little pain as I can manage and full utilization of the meat and resources the animal provides.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    37

    Default

    Is Copenhagen a ritual?

  16. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by .338 mag. View Post
    Around my house we believe in Jesus. We always offer up prayers to the Creator thanking Him for His creation. Before we head out we pray for safety and ask for His blessings on the hunt and thank Him for it whether we make a gut pile or not. We stress the importance of this to our grand kids and trust them to carry on this "tradition".



    The only thing I would add is that the best way to show respect to the animal is to make sure you do everything in your power to make a humane kill, try your best to locate any animal that is wounded, punch your harvest ticket even if you don't find a wounded animal, and last but not least, harvest ALL edible meat to the best of your ability.

    Other than that, my motto is to worship the creator (God) and not the creation (the animal being harvested). Make no mistake, that animal did not give itself up for a sacrifice. It tried it's hardest to escape being killed. If anyone needs to be thanked it should be the creator of all life for allowing the hunter to be successful. There's my .02 cents anyhow.

  17. #17

    Default

    Something like the quote from the beginning of the Last of the Mohicans after they take an elk.

    "We're sorry to kill you, brother. We do honor to your courage and speed, your strength."

  18. #18
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,750

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Leatherface3825 View Post
    I appreciate everyone's input. I didn't want to do something that I find appropriate only to go out with someone else and get accused of being a weirdo or something.
    If you find it appropriate and and not offensive in any way, then who cares what somebody else thinks. It's something that reflects your inner feelings about an animal that you will probably care deeply about. The taking of life, any life, should not be taken lightly. When you find something that meaningfully shows how you feel about the gift that has been given, then that's all that matters, and shouldn't be open for debate.....

    I remember reading an article once about a hunter that was an artist. After the kill, before he would do anything else, he would sit down, take out his sketch book and with just a pencil he would draw the eyes of the animal he just killed. Some people may call it weird but I don't because I saw the beautiful sketches. It was his way of honoring the animal....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    499

    Default

    I watch a minimum of 4 to 5 hunting videos focused on the target species im hunting about a week before going afield just to get properly motivated and in the right frame of mind. I have my lucky hunting shirts and hats as well.

    I'm more into thanking God the Creator more so than thanking the animal. If it wasnt for him tilting the northern hemisphere just right and getting the temperatures just right moose, caribou and bears might not even exist. Moose are in the woods that's His part. My part is to be well practiced with my weapon, be able to identify legal animals and be at the same place at the same time a legal animal is.

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    2,083

    Default

    No a ritual, but I do let the animal die in peace as I watch from a short distance (out of its danger zone, I guess), then I thank God. However, since I am taking a life I do my best to take the best care possible for all the edible meat.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •