Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: China Poot Bay

  1. #1

    Default China Poot Bay

    Can anyone provide me with some information about China Poot Bay? I know it becomes mud and rock at low tide but can you use a 22 foot boat during July to fish for the sockeyes that appear to accumulate there? I'm not a resident so I can't dip net. Any information would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Member polardds's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    801

    Default

    Depends on the tides. Best to Anchor out and take a raft up so you can raft back to your boat and fish as long as you like. Otherwise your fishing time may be extremely limited due to the tide, or extremely long when you get stuck for a tide change.

  3. #3
    Member 0321Tony's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Sterling, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    1,712

    Default

    It's possible to take a bigger boat in and out but you better know the channel at low tide. The tide rips really fast through there when it's moving and once you realize it's too shallow it's too late. However inside chinapoot it is plenty deep enough to anchor up and not worry.

  4. #4
    Member sayak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Central peninsula, between the K-rivers
    Posts
    5,788

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 0321Tony View Post
    It's possible to take a bigger boat in and out but you better know the channel at low tide. The tide rips really fast through there when it's moving and once you realize it's too shallow it's too late. However inside chinapoot it is plenty deep enough to anchor up and not worry.
    This is a fact! You can anchor up and take a raft ashore, but the incoming tide is like a fast river! You might want a small outboard or you will try time and time again to paddle to your anchored boat only to overshoot it. We finally got some help from another skiff and then we had to try pull up the anchor. I don't even want to talk about how hard that was...

  5. #5
    Member homerdave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    homer, alaska
    Posts
    3,922

    Default

    My advice would be to follow a local boat in. If the fish are there there will be plenty of traffic. You will have better luck snagging from your boat so plan on taking your bout to where the creek flows in, that's where the fish congregate. The stream itself is far to small for angling.
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
    http://www.alaskabackcountryhunters.org/

  6. #6
    Member cdubbin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    KP, the dingleberry of Alaska
    Posts
    1,749

    Default

    Maybe give Tutka Lagoon a try instead....fishing's just as good and less tricky boating (although you can get stuck there if you're really trying).
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sailcal View Post
    Can anyone provide me with some information about China Poot Bay? I know it becomes mud and rock at low tide but can you use a 22 foot boat during July to fish for the sockeyes that appear to accumulate there? I'm not a resident so I can't dip net. Any information would be appreciated.
    sailcal, I spent many summers in China poot fishing the commercial run there. It can be a daunting place because of the tides but there aren't many rocks and most of the bottom is soft. The best way to learn the ropes there is to select a smallish set of tides (no minus) and get there (mouth of China Poot bay) at the published low. That way you can gunk your way in and see the lay of the land. It's quit easy to get into the deeper left side that way, and if you have a smaller launch to get to the right side (where the fish are) it makes it a lot easier. One can pretty much get in and out of the right side on any but the minus tides with a 22fottish boat, you just have to learn the channel.

    Without the dip net, one is left to snagging which, at times, can be productive there. The trick is to call the Homer Dept of fish and Game beforehand to see if any 'cost recovery' fishing has been done by the aquaculture assn. They do that periodically and afterwads the pickins' are slim. The peak of the run is between the 10th and 20th.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •