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Thread: Another charter question

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    Default Another charter question

    I retire from the Air Force this month and am headed on a multi-week road trip to Alaska at the first of June with my brother. Headed to Ninilchik Charters for a few days fishing. My brother is an avid fly fisherman. Any tips I can give him to catch some stuff in the salt? Hoping for a couple nice halibut and red snapper, too bad lings aren't open. And then also, the obligatory, got any info on the charters? I researched it a ton. Just wondering if anyone has actually been on it. I know, I know, why post AFTER I booked. Long story. Anyways, this is my first post on here and wanted to say, I cant wait to get there. Thanks everyone.

    Gavin

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gavin1982 View Post
    Any tips I can give him to catch some stuff in the salt?
    Saltwater fly fishing is real situational. Right time, right place, right species. June can be tough for salmon until the later part when pink salmon start to follow the shorelines. They're perfect fly rod fish- cooperative and small enough that 6WTs and even 5WTs are fine. They come in hordes later in the run, so you can catch dozens in a day. Early fish will be feeding on needlefish and other coastal foods. It's hard to beat #4 Clausers less than 2" long in a variety of colors. Average weight is around 3.5#.

    Not many folks hear about them, but searun Dolly Varden trout are prime along beaches in June. Fortunately the same rods and flies for pink salmon are tops for them. They're feeding in the same places on the same foods, so where you find one you're likely to find the other. Depending on where, average size ranges from 12" to 16" or so, with a few individuals topping 20" everywhere.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    By red snapper do you mean yellow eye rock fish? While Ninilchik is a wonderful location for halibut, not so much for rock fish.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    By red snapper do you mean yellow eye rock fish? While Ninilchik is a wonderful location for halibut, not so much for rock fish.
    I believe ninilchik charters has boats in other ports as well as ninilchik.
    Responsible Conservation > Political Allocation

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    plan a trip to the Kenai river get a guide if it is with in your pocket book, if not go to the upper an look for a parking spot an follow the trail
    be carfull, lots of bears there , an lots of fish also Copper landing is a good place to hook up with a guide,
    SID I think PS carefull read the regs. an under stand them they are very funny , you might get into some reds are the Rush. river
    have fun ,

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    i know the owner of ninilchik charters and many of the guides. you can expect a quality trip they work hard to get you on fish.

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    When you go out on the charters look where they are tossing the halibut carcasses on the beaches. Good size dollies cruise the shorelines that time of year. And will hold where there is any additional good source. Easy with anything that looks like food with a flyrod.


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    Thanks everyone for the tips. He would love to catch some trout in the salt. But seriously, what exactly is the difference between yellow eye and snapper?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gavin1982 View Post
    Thanks everyone for the tips. He would love to catch some trout in the salt. But seriously, what exactly is the difference between yellow eye and snapper?
    "Red snapper" is a local name for yelloweye rockfish up in Alaska. True snapper are warm water fish found in places like the Gulf of Mexico. But, if you're in Alaska and hear someone talking about red snapper, they're talking about yelloweye.

    Yelloweye rockfish: http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/bottomfis...uberrimus.html

    Red Snapper: https://tpwd.texas.gov/huntwild/wild...es/redsnapper/

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    Thanks Uncle Zeek. Very informative

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Buddy with a yellow eye

    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    Looking for several of those! Nice looking fish

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    Here's some more pictures to get you amped. My boys and I managed to get a limit in short order that day and some of the biggest we've ever landed.



    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    DAMMIT Paul! That's just MEAN!! How much do they weigh? Is a 40 pounder unrealistic?

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    I've never weighed one, I prefer to fillet them on the boat and drop the carcusses overboard. 40#'s would be a world record, I'd say anything over 10#'s is a nice size fish and 20#'s a real monster.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    This one is 21 pounds 6 ounces (unofficially with my digital scale).Montague_Karen&Jay_216.jpg

    I'd like to see a forty pounder!

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    Out of ninilchik, ask to target black bass (black rock fish). They are delicious and fun to catch if you get on them... I know they are capable of finding these in that general area.

    IMO, An all around bottom fishing charter is probably some of the most fun you could have on a charter out of ninilchik. Salmon trolling is fun too, but like previously stated, spotty during that time of year. Flossing reds in the Russian is fun when the fish are in, and has a steep learning curve, observe the successful fisherman and try to do what they're doing. No guide required, just follow the crowds.

    Good luck.

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    That is a STUD of a fish!!! Maybe i was reading something that got me thinking they got that big. Or maybe a fisherman was telling a tale. Do they still do that? I hope to have a couple to eat each night on the boat. I understand we cant do a lot with the halibut till we get back but we are cool with it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gpaul99 View Post
    Out of ninilchik, ask to target black bass (black rock fish). They are delicious and fun to catch if you get on them... I know they are capable of finding these in that general area.

    IMO, An all around bottom fishing charter is probably some of the most fun you could have on a charter out of ninilchik. Salmon trolling is fun too, but like previously stated, spotty during that time of year. Flossing reds in the Russian is fun when the fish are in, and has a steep learning curve, observe the successful fisherman and try to do what they're doing. No guide required, just follow the crowds.

    Good luck.
    This means we have a SHOT at some reds???? that would be amazing! we will be bringing some of our own gear for the rivers so i gess we are gonna have to check it out. I also love to catch sea bass and yes they are great to eat. We fish out of Washington for those, lings and halibut. I just want to do the charter with my brother. I cant explain it. How big do the sea bass get up there?

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    Same fish on top of a 70 quart cooler.Montague Karen&Jay 223.jpg

    Man - the pik attachment functionality is really crappy today (even more than usual)!

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