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Thread: Sleeping Bag for Float Hunt

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    Question Sleeping Bag for Float Hunt

    I need to get a sleeping bag for an upcoming float hunt in the Brooks. I've been advised to stick with synthetic fill bags. What do you all think about the Mountain Hardwear Lamina bags?

    Men's Lamina 0 (3lb 10oz): http://www.mountainhardwear.com/mens...r=858#start=20

    Men's Lamina -15 (4lb 9oz): http://www.mountainhardwear.com/mens...w%200#start=19

    HyperLamina Torch 0 (3lb 8oz): http://www.mountainhardwear.com/hype...or=632#start=6

    I have a 90lb personal gear limit. Any thoughts on which of these (if any) would be best suited to a ten-day Brooks float beginning on September 10th?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnboy View Post
    I need to get a sleeping bag for an upcoming float hunt in the Brooks. I've been advised to stick with synthetic fill bags. What do you all think about the Mountain Hardwear Lamina bags?

    Men's Lamina 0 (3lb 10oz): http://www.mountainhardwear.com/mens...r=858#start=20

    Men's Lamina -15 (4lb 9oz): http://www.mountainhardwear.com/mens...w%200#start=19

    HyperLamina Torch 0 (3lb 8oz): http://www.mountainhardwear.com/mens...w%200#start=19

    I have a 90lb personal gear limit. Any thoughts on which of these (if any) would be best suited to a ten-day Brooks float beginning on September 10th?
    The WARMEST one you can get. It can get chilly up there that time of year. Being able to sleep comfortably cannot be stressed enough. MHO.
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    I have an old Lamina 20, and it's plenty warm for me unless it's "winter"
    My wife has a newer Lamina 0, and she finds it much more comfortable than my 20 when temperatures are around freezing.

    I don't think you should have any need for a Lamina -15. That's a big bag.

    Of course, Julie is right. If you have the room and the wallet for a -15 bag, you'll probably be happy in it. I just don't think it's at all necessary for September in the Brooks. A 0 degree bag should be plenty warm.

    Bring a pair of longjohns that you sleep in. That adds ten degrees or more to your bag.

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    I have a Lamina 35 that I used in the Brooks last September, got snowed on for most of a week. I was plenty warm with a base layer on underneath. I realize that everyone is different, and I tend to get pretty warm when I sleep, but I have to agree with HikerDan that a -15 is a bit overkill, the 0 bag should be plenty.

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    I always take the warmest bag that I can. You can always open it up. If you're cold in the bag you will be miserable, tired and won't enjoy the trip as much.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Casper50 View Post
    I always take the warmest bag that I can. You can always open it up. If you're cold in the bag you will be miserable, tired and won't enjoy the trip as much.
    This pretty much sums it up. I have a 0 degree bag that I took on the Ivishak last year. Synthetic, good quality. And, to put it in the simplest terms. I was cold. LOL I had two prs of long johns on (light and mid) and my down coat thrown on top. I think I had only one night where I was comfortably warm. Next time I WILL have a warmer bag. I don't care how much it weighs.

    Our friends, who went along had 40 below bags. They were too hot and unzipped their bags every night except one or two. They didn't mind rubbing it in, either!
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    Quote Originally Posted by JuliW View Post
    This pretty much sums it up. I have a 0 degree bag that I took on the Ivishak last year. Synthetic, good quality. And, to put it in the simplest terms. I was cold. LOL I had two prs of long johns on (light and mid) and my down coat thrown on top. I think I had only one night where I was comfortably warm. Next time I WILL have a warmer bag. I don't care how much it weighs.

    Our friends, who went along had 40 below bags. They were too hot and unzipped their bags every night except one or two. They didn't mind rubbing it in, either!
    At times like this I like to take a nalgene bottle or similar and put hot water in it then put the bottle in the bag. It does wonders! Try it out
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    In september i use a zero degree bag and october a-20.

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    If you already have an equivalent 0F down bag don't be afraid to take that. Your bags and tent will be in a drybag anyways (better be) so just because you are floating does not rule out down. I use my down bags on the river without fear of the wet bag scenario that people like to preach. My raft is always rigged for a flip and my critical items could sit in the river all day in their drybags or dryboxes without me worrying about them being wet when I recover them.

    This drybag is a good choice. http://www.nrs.com/product/2900/nrs-...ls-bag-dry-bag
    It is plenty big for multiple sleeping bags or a tent, has shoulder harnesses for packing to/from the river or strip, and is absolutely bombprofoof waterproof as long as you close it properly. I'd buy a high visibility color too. You don't need green, black, or cammo while floating or camping.

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    If you have a good drybag (Watershed) I'd recommend trying a down bag for the weight savings. 90-lb personal gear limit forces us to start counting ounces, IMO. A good 0 degree bag will be worth its weight if the weather turns sour. Last few years it's a gamble on what to expect with temperatures in september. Some spells are 60+ degrees with 40s at night, so a 0 degree will be overkill.

    Down bags and the external fabric coatings have come a long way in the last 10 years. Most of the conventional wisdom was forged in the 90s and early 2000s as far as the down vs. synthetic discussion. I agree that 10 years ago my advice was to go with synthetic...but the lighter my packing lists gets the more necessary it is to shave a pound or two where ever I can...and the sleeping system is a big part of potential savings.

    My advice is to keep a down bag inside a Watershed drybag and properly sealed, period. Then, upgrade to a NeoAir air mattress and shed the heavier old school pads. With this combo, you cut 2-3 lbs off your packing list and a lot of bulk, which is just as critical, IMO.

    Check out Western Mountaineering 5 degree bags, which is what I use for all my September float hunts these days. Plenty of warmth and lots of space and weight savings.

    Condensation inside the tent might be a problem with tipi-style tents, but you can manage that well enough with foresight and careful sleeping habits.

    Just my 2 pennies worth. Tent selection is another topic for weight savings, but IMO the other items must weigh what they weigh and we compensate in areas where suitable choices exist, and bags and pads are doable for several pounds here and there.

    Larry

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    Member JuliW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mjm316 View Post
    At times like this I like to take a nalgene bottle or similar and put hot water in it then put the bottle in the bag. It does wonders! Try it out
    Did, and it did help!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnboy View Post
    Any thoughts on which of these (if any) would be best suited to a ten-day Brooks float beginning on September 10th?
    If that's all you plan on it for then I'd think the 0 bag should be plenty. But, a good bag is an investment. You may want to think about possible uses after this hunt. Is there a possibility that you may need a warmer bag in the future.....cold weather camping in WI...??? If so, go with the -15 so you have it later on and call it good....
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    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Bartlett View Post
    Tent selection is another topic for weight savings...
    I've planned on a MH Trango 4, which weighs about 12lbs. That's another area that I've looked into and figured a 4-man would provide comfortable space for 2 guys + gear at a reasonable weight. However, I haven't yet scrutinized over the weight of my entire gear list, so I don't have a firm handle on where I can afford some give-and-take. I need to invest some time into that subject, no doubt.

    Thanks for your input, everyone. Good points and interesting perspectives all around.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnboy View Post
    I've planned on a MH Trango 4, which weighs about 12lbs. That's another area that I've looked into and figured a 4-man would provide comfortable space for 2 guys + gear at a reasonable weight.
    4-season tents are way warmer than 3-season tents. If you are going with a Trango 4 (It's heavy, but you will love it), you have that much less need for a -15F bag.

    You can cut your weight almost in half, with similar comfort at a similar price by going with a Hillerberg Nallo 4 instead of the Trango 4. It's not free standing, so you have to guy it out well, but it's an excellent tent, with significant vestibule room, which I think you will appreciate. They are radically different tents so you should probably take a look at both of them before you decide.

    Either tent gives you similar thermal performance and weatherproof. Trango might be slightly better in the wind.

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    Quote Originally Posted by HikerDan View Post
    4-season tents are way warmer than 3-season tents. If you are going with a Trango 4 (It's heavy, but you will love it), you have that much less need for a -15F bag.

    You can cut your weight almost in half, with similar comfort at a similar price by going with a Hillerberg Nallo 4 instead of the Trango 4. It's not free standing, so you have to guy it out well, but it's an excellent tent, with significant vestibule room, which I think you will appreciate. They are radically different tents so you should probably take a look at both of them before you decide.

    Either tent gives you similar thermal performance and weatherproof. Trango might be slightly better in the wind.
    HikerDan, you have me intrigued by that tent. One potentially deciding factor, though, is that I can get a 40% discount on the Trango 4, which puts it at under half the price of the Nallo 4. I guess I'll have to figure out how much 5lbs is worth to me. Man, these ounces get expensive!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnboy View Post
    t I can get a 40% discount on the Trango 4, which puts it at under half the price of the Nallo 4. I guess I'll have to figure out how much 5lbs is worth to me. Man, these ounces get expensive!
    One thing in favor of the Trango is that in moderate conditions it's super easy to pitch and you don't have to worry about guying it out well. I use my 4-season tent, which is designed much like a Trango, for car camping, mostly because it's so easy to pitch.

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    Quote Originally Posted by HikerDan View Post
    One thing in favor of the Trango is that in moderate conditions it's super easy to pitch and you don't have to worry about guying it out well. I use my 4-season tent, which is designed much like a Trango, for car camping, mostly because it's so easy to pitch.
    So - never having used one - how does a free standing, non guyed tent handle a 50 mph breeze? I can almost see one, bouncing across the tundra, or down a mountain side.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary View Post
    So - never having used one - how does a free standing, non guyed tent handle a 50 mph breeze? I can almost see one, bouncing across the tundra, or down a mountain side.
    Well... I wouldn't describe 50 mph breeze as "moderate conditions", but I have certainly pitched my dome tents on a river bank with doing only a cursory job of setting guy lines before, and will do so ago.

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    i used an ultra lamina 0 -18c for the last three years in the yukon not with a paddle canoe but a freighter canoe. if you re a little longer than the average and having broad shoulders you will thank me ...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnboy View Post
    I've planned on a MH Trango 4, which weighs about 12lbs. That's another area that I've looked into and figured a 4-man would provide comfortable space for 2 guys + gear at a reasonable weight. However, I haven't yet scrutinized over the weight of my entire gear list, so I don't have a firm handle on where I can afford some give-and-take. I need to invest some time into that subject, no doubt.

    Thanks for your input, everyone. Good points and interesting perspectives all around.
    I posted this a few days ago in case you are interested...... http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...-tent-sale-!!!
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