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Thread: casting jigs while Surfcast fishing?

  1. #1
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Default casting jigs while Surfcast fishing?

    So I made up some small jigs awhile back that are a near perfect imitation of a Hooligan.
    I used holographic foil for the sides and black paint for the back and sealed them up with an epoxy top coat.
    I was thinking these would work good this time of year surfcasting.
    The ones I made are 2 and 3 ounce but I an also thinking of making some out of tin for the same look and size but 1/3 less weight.
    These are flutter jigs so a slender profile type of jig.
    Has anybody tried casting jigs for butts off the beach?
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by kasilofchrisn View Post
    Has anybody tried casting jigs for butts off the beach?
    Yeah, in a few select locations with access to deeper water- on the order of 20' or so. Especially late July through the end of August when the halibut come close in pursuit of pink salmon and needlefish. Other times of year and shallower are not so productive. Sand or gravel bottom are best, but they hang along the edge of kelp on rocky bottom too. Problem with the kelp is, they often go right back into it pretty quick.

    Your choice of a "flutter" style jig is insightful. We've tried all sorts of jigs including diamond, dart, leadheads with plastic tails or bucktail, and some of the new long stuff. Bouncing a jig along the bottom is pretty well worthless, or has been in our waters. Skimming them 1-3' off bottom with a steady retrieve is good. But even better is to get them to lift and move forward, then fall without touching bottom. Do that by lifting the rod sharply without reeling, then reeling in just fast enough to keep the line tight while you lower the rod back down. The LuhrJensen Herring jigs have proven about the best commercial model for that, while the Do-It flutter jigs are the best I've built myself.

    One thing about it.... If you run into fish much more than about 50#, have lots of line on your reel. Lots and lots. Halibut in the shallows have only one thing on their mind when you hook them.... Getting back out into deep water as fast as they can! Talk about wild runs. My biggest to date is a 105, but I've lost some I'm sure were bigger. "Lost" isn't the right word. Should have said "spooled by." Son-in-law managed a 139 a few years back, but he was down to the last few turns of line on his reel. That particular reel is loaded with 600 yards of 50# braid, by the way. He says he landed it due to his superior angling skill. I say he's unfortunate to take pride in such a lazy fish.

  3. #3
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Thanks BrownBear.
    Yes these are the Do-It flutter jigs. I have the molds for all the bigger sizes.
    These look so much like a Hooligan I have to try it.
    Especially go en our big Hooligan runs Here in Cook Inlet.
    I've heard making these in Tin makes for an awesome jig with a different action compared to the lead version.
    You ever cast any in Tin?
    I have a few pounds of tin I bought just for this kind of stuff.
    When I try them I'll post a report.
    Usually I just use bait from the beach.
    I have a couple of rod/reel combos to choose from that have plenty of line on them.
    A Penn fierce 8000on the one 13' rod and a Big Alvey reel on a 12' Alvey rod. Both with braid on them.
    I've caught butts off the beach before but smaller fish using bait.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

  4. #4

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    Yup! Sounds like you're just the guy to be making and testing them- experience both with the fishing and the molds.

    My only experience with "tin" is with a bunch of 50/50 bar solder I picked up years ago and still have the remnants. Used to fish on the West Coast with a sage old character who commercial fished ling cod with rod and reel. Back in the late 1960's he made up his own molds (he was a master machinist, too) that turned out not unlike the Do-It flutter jigs. But that was just the start of it.

    He'd cast a couple of jigs, then tap them together to see how they sounded. If they went "thud" they were too soft and he'd add tin and sometimes antimony (in the form of linotype). If they "pinged" too sharply they were too hard, and he'd dilute with lead. He was after a particular sound he wanted when the jigs were bouncing on hard bottom. I don't have his ear and after all these years couldn't begin to describe that soft ping he was after. But I will say that his jigs fished better than any others for halibut on hard bottom. I tried casting some of the Do-Its with wheelweights, and they were too soft to come close to his ping. Straight linotype was definitely too pingy, though.

    He's long dead and his jigs are long gone, or I'd offer to send you some.

    Dunno about tin changing the action other than making them lighter, but it makes sense that they would be more lively. That would be good. While you're at it though, try pinging around with your alloy and see if you can make something happen there, too.

  5. #5
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    I have some "Superhard" from Rotometals. It is 70% lead and 30% Antimony.
    Since the Antimony is already in Alloy it makes it much easier to add to my lead to make it harder.
    Too bad you don't have any of those jigs left. I have a hardness tester that I could use to give us the Brinell hardness of them so it could be easily repeatable.
    If I find it I'll post a link to the video where the guy describes using tin for the flutter jigs. I think he was fishing Lakers or something on one of the great lakes shore fishing.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

  6. #6
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Here is the video I remember watching on Tin Flutter jigs.
    https://youtu.be/RZU21R97qDo
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

  7. #7
    Charterboat Operator kodiakcombo's Avatar
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    Im interested in some tin jigs!
    Quote Originally Posted by kasilofchrisn View Post
    So I made up some small jigs awhile back that are a near perfect imitation of a Hooligan.
    I used holographic foil for the sides and black paint for the back and sealed them up with an epoxy top coat.
    I was thinking these would work good this time of year surfcasting.
    The ones I made are 2 and 3 ounce but I an also thinking of making some out of tin for the same look and size but 1/3 less weight.
    These are flutter jigs so a slender profile type of jig.
    Has anybody tried casting jigs for butts off the beach?
    Providing trips for multilpe species for over 20 yrs
    www.kodiakcombos.com

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