Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 26

Thread: Backpacking Stoves

  1. #1
    Member Matt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    3,410

    Default Backpacking Stoves

    What's everyone using nowadays?

  2. #2
    Member BIGAKSTUFF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    449

    Default

    I'm still using a MSR whisperlite. I've considered crossing over to a jetboil a few times, but I still like the thought of having a mini-fire that I dont have to feed wood too, with me at all times. Also like using my aluminum pan over this little stove to fry up fish or bird chunks every now and then....
    The Second Amendment.......Know it, love it, support it.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    1,905

    Default

    Running a jet boil, but still use my Coleman Peak One stoves sometimes.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

  4. #4
    Member polardds's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    802

    Default

    Depends on the mission. Light weight, fast and I all I want is to boil water then the Jetboil. I do like my Snow Peak Gigapower stove for real light weight and if I want a small pan to cook with too. I like my MSR Dragon fly for trips where I may want to be more of a gourmet rather than just heating up water and if I don't want to deal with canisters. I do tinker with my boilerworks back country boiler (think small Kelly Kettle)for fun too. (http://www.theboilerwerks.com/about/)

  5. #5

    Default

    Gave my gigapower to my daughter. Good for small and light, not so good in cold and altitude.
    Like the MSR Dragonfly but just added the quietstove.com burner to QUIET the blankin thing down...yes, it works. This one does spill a bit of fuel when taking off the fuel bottle, and is bigger than needed sometimes but does most things very well.
    Just picked up a Fourdog stoves Bushcooker 3 stick stove to try. Barely got it out of the box but I like real fire sometimes to satisfy my inner pyro...will try it asap.
    Get the correct pots so your stove fits inside and it makes a nice package.

  6. #6
    New member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    13

    Default

    I have seen too many jet boils fail to work here in Kodiak with high winds I ise the msr reactor stove and have gone head to head a few different times with my friends on boiling water in the wind etc. I will always carry my msr reactor over anything else

  7. #7
    Member GrassLakeRon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Grass Lake Michigan
    Posts
    1,978

    Default

    Made all of mine. My latest uses a stainless kitchen utensil strainer. Works fast and I used fuel from around the camp site to save weight. My smallest is made from a tailpipe connecter.
    "Equipped with his five senses, man explores the universe around him and calls the adventure science"

    Edwin Hubble

  8. #8
    New member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,417

    Default

    Depends on what you're doing but for a water boiler the MSR Reactor.
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

  9. #9
    Member 2dawgs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    642

    Default

    I like my jet boil, works perfect for what I need. Heck it even has a coffee press thingy I never used. Anyone used the press, do they work?

  10. #10
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    13,396

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 2dawgs View Post
    I like my jet boil, works perfect for what I need. Heck it even has a coffee press thingy I never used. Anyone used the press, do they work?
    The jetboil french press is awesome. Grind your coffee a bit more coarse than usual so that it stays under the filter - the best coffee you'll ever have in the woods. We use ours regularly.

  11. #11
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,749

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SmokeRoss View Post
    Running a jet boil, but still use my Coleman Peak One stoves sometimes.
    Again....I'm waaaaaay behind the times. The Peak One "Feather" is all I have. Wish it really was as light as a feather........lol
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  12. #12
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,749

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by polardds View Post
    I do tinker with my boilerworks back country boiler (think small Kelly Kettle)for fun too. (http://www.theboilerwerks.com/about/)
    Those things look great for sure. But I don't know if I would like to always have to depend on finding something dry to burn......
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  13. #13
    Member mtnclimber's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Anchorage, Ak
    Posts
    354

    Default

    I'm using a soto micro regulator with a jet boil TI cup with slits cut so it locks onto the stove. its been great in cold weather and warm.

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    723

    Default

    Jet boil (the one was regulator for colder temps) since last year.

    MSR whisper light forever before that.

    Just trying to shed some oz because of baby. And getting old.

    The jet boil also benefits from not priming and being faster. But you need some creativity make anything other than freeze dried food with it.

  15. #15

    Default

    SOLO Stove.

  16. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mtnclimber View Post
    i'm using a soto micro regulator with a jet boil ti cup with slits cut so it locks onto the stove. Its been great in cold weather and warm.
    ^^^^this!!!

  17. #17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AKRazn View Post
    I have seen too many jet boils fail to work here in Kodiak with high winds I ise the msr reactor stove and have gone head to head a few different times with my friends on boiling water in the wind etc. I will always carry my msr reactor over anything else
    I haven't had a problem with wind. That said if its windy enough to blow out a jetboil I will be in the tent cooking up my meal anyways so wind isn't really an issue for me atleast.

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    81

    Default

    Which one of above mentioned would be the best weight-conscious option for boiling water (mostly) and an occasional fish fry?

  19. #19
    Member hoose35's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Soldotna, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    2,891

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Johnboy View Post
    Which one of above mentioned would be the best weight-conscious option for boiling water (mostly) and an occasional fish fry?
    I like the pocket rocket the best for weight savings and boiling water
    Responsible Conservation > Political Allocation

  20. #20
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    The jetboil french press is awesome. Grind your coffee a bit more coarse than usual so that it stays under the filter - the best coffee you'll ever have in the woods. We use ours regularly.
    You called that one, coarse grind works better in all outdoors French presses I've used. On Peets website, you can order it coarse ground. Major Dickinsons and Arabian Mocha Java are two fine offerings from Peets. Got spoiled by it years ago, while living in AK. Been ordering it ever since.

    As for stoves, Whisperlite International X2 with a spare pump for my remote trips. Time tested.


    Dan


    Sorry for long post, can't find the link. Had this saved in old email.





    How to prepare
    an MSR-type stove
    for cold-weather
    expeditioning

    Pre-trip preparations...
    [ ] Instruction manual--read it thoroughly.

    [ ] Fuel cells--wash them out
    Using a long-handled, bottle-washing brush and hot, soapy water, scrub the interior of each fuel bottle to remove any gunk or foreign matter.
    Next, rinse each fuel bottle with hot water several times to completely flush out any impurities or particulate matter. Once rinsed, set each bottle aside, upside down with the caps removed, to allow any remaining water to drain out or evaporate.

    [ ] Fuel cells--store empty, with cap loose
    When not in use, fuel bottles should be emptied of fuel to prevent the accumulation of degraded fuel deposits that may eventually affect stove operation. Once emptied, fuel bottles should be stored with their caps in place, but loose, to prevent debris from entering the bottle and to prevent the fuel cap O-ring from taking a set, which could lead to leakage later.

    [ ] Fuel pump--inspect large Fuel Bottle O-ring near threads on pump housing
    Make sure the large Fuel Bottle O-ring on the outside of the pump housing--at the top of the threads, where the pump seals against the lip of the opening in the fuel bottle--is flexible and soft. If it is hard, flattened, pitted, cracked, torn, or otherwise damaged, replace it so the pump housing and fuel bottle will seal properly at subzero temperatures and allow the fuel bottle to be pressurized.
    Inventory the contents of your repair kit to make sure you have a spare Fuel Bottle O-ring.

    [ ] Fuel Pump--install a filter on the fuel pump's Dip Tube
    If the fuel pump's plastic output fuel line--called the Dip Tube (not to be confused with the Air Hose, through which air is pumped into the fuel bottle when the pump plunger is pumped)--does not have a small filter attached to the end of it, install an MSR Dragonfly Pump Filter on it to prevent condensation, particulate matter such as sand or bits of metal, and other contaminants in the fuel tank from entering the stove and gunking or plugging it up.

    [ ] Fuel pump--lubricate Leather Pump Cup on fuel pump plunger
    Remove the pump plunger from the fuel pump and lubricate the Leather Pump Cup with MSR Pump Cup Oil, 3-in-1 oil, or light motor oil so it will form an airtight seal and allow the plunger to pressurize the fuel tank. If necessary, spread or stretch out the Leather Pump Cup with your fingers and work the oil into the leather a bit.
    Function-test pump to make sure it works properly. When the Pump Plunger is pushed down into the pump housing, air should be forced out of the Air Hose. Install the pump in an empty fuel bottle and make sure the pump is able to pressurize the bottle.
    It the pump pressurizing mechanism fails in the bush, just stretching out the pump leather with your fingers may be enough to get it to seal. In a pinch, saliva, lip balm, sunscreen, petroleum jelly, or margarine can be used to lubricate the Leather Pump Cup and help it create a seal.
    Inventory the contents of your repair kit to make sure you have a spare Leather Pump Cup.

    [ ] Fuel pump--inspect & clean Check Valve Ball & Check Valve Spring
    Remove the Check Valve Plug from the fuel pump housing and inspect and clean the Check Valve Ball and Check Valve Spring. Clean the check valve chamber in the fuel pump housing before reinstallation.
    Inventory the contents of your repair kit to make sure you have a spare Check Valve Ball and Spring.

    [ ] Fuel pump--inspect Fuel Tube O-ring
    Remove the Fuel Tube Bushing from the fuel pump housing and inspect the Fuel Tube O-ring to make sure it is still flexible and undamaged. If it is hard, flattened, pitted, cracked, torn, or otherwise damaged, replace it so the stove fuel line will seal properly when it is inserted in the fuel pump housing.
    This particular O-ring is a weak point in the MSR stove on long-range, subzero expeditions, especially at temperatures below minus-20 degrees Fahrenheit. Inventory the contents of your repair kit to make sure you have spare Fuel Tube O-rings. As mentioned below, it is highly recommended that you order several extra Fuel Tube O-rings from your local MSR dealer.

    [ ] Stove--clean out Fuel Line
    Thoroughly clean the interior the Fuel Line to remove accumulated carbon deposits and other particulate matter. First, remove the Jet--unscrew it in a counterclockwise manner--from the Fuel Line. Next, clean the interior of the Fuel Line and the exterior of the Fuel Line Cable by repeatedly working the cable in and out of the full length of the Fuel Line. Use the cable to scour out the Fuel Line much like you would use a pipe cleaner in a pipe.
    To remove and reinstall the Fuel Line Cable, insert one end of the cable in the small hole in the jet-and-cable tool. If you opt to use pliers for this task, clamp down on the small, round weld at the end of the cable. Do not grip the cable itself as it may fray the tiny wires, the sharp ends of which could later damage the delicate Fuel Tube O-ring.
    As you work the cable in and out of the Fuel Line, wet the cable down with solvent. From time to time, wipe the cable off with a clean rag or paper towel and rinse the Fuel Line out with solvent. Continue this reaming process--focusing on the generator tube where most of the carbon deposits tend to build up--until the fuel line cable no longer deposits black residue on a piece of paper towel drawn along its length.
    Especially-stubborn carbon deposits in the generator tube can sometimes be dislodged by heating the generator tube over a flame and then quickly cooling the tube with water.
    With the Fuel Line Cable reinstalled in the Fuel Line--sans Jet--flush the interior of the assembly with four ounces (half a cup) of pressured fuel by attaching it to the fuel pump, which should be installed in a fuel bottle containing fresh, filtered fuel.

    [ ] Stove--clean Jet orifice
    Once the fuel line is scoured and rinsed out, clean the stove's all-important jet assembly. With the jet removed from the fuel line, scrub any carbon deposits from the exterior of the jet and then carefully ream out the jet orifice using the wire jet cleaning tool. Once reamed out and rinsed, hold the jet up to a light and peer through it, making sure it is free of obstructions. The edges of the round hole should be readily apparent and clearly defined, and the center of the hole should be very clear and crisp. If you are unsure of how it should appear, compare and contrast it with the spare jet included in the repair kit.

    [ ] Stove--check Shaker Jet for proper operation
    On stoves with shaker-jet-type Jets, make sure the shaker-jet mechanism functions properly. You should be able to hear the shaker jet clicking back and forth as the stove is repeatedly tipped upside-down and then back up. Memorize this sound so you can identify when the weighted wire reamer inside the Jet is functioning and when it is not. If the Jet mechanism is functioning properly, inverting the stove will force the weighted wire reamer inside the Jet to ream the Jet orifice out, forcing any obstructions out. If the weighted wire reamer is stuck, or if the orifice in the Jet is heavily obstructed, you may have use the wire jet cleaning tool in your repair kit to clear the orifice. In some cases, you may have to remove the Jet and clean it from the inside out since the wire jet cleaning tool may just be forcing the obstruction back into the Fuel Line, only to be carried back into the jet when the fuel is turned on.

    [ ] Stove operation--burn-test stove
    Once the stove is reassembled, test fire it for several minutes to make sure it operates properly.

    [ ] Stove storage--cover exposed nipple end of Fuel Line with a plastic bag
    To prevent any debris from entering the open, nipple end of the Fuel Line during storage, cover it with a small, narrow, clean plastic bag secured with a rubber band.
    An excellent plastic bag for this purpose is a tough, 8-ounce-size baby bottle liner such as the "Playtex Nurser System Soft Bottle Liner." Avoid using a larger plastic bag since its wide mouth will collect more debris, which will eventually work its way down into the bag and into the Fuel Line.

    [ ] Fuel pump storage--store fuel pump loosely in an empty fuel bottle; cover pump with plastic bag
    To prevent the Fuel Pump O-ring from taking a set and later leaking, always store the fuel pump loosely--not tightened down--in an empty fuel bottle.
    To prevent debris from entering the fuel pump via the exposed Fuel Tube Bushing opening during storage, cover the pump housing with a small, narrow, clean plastic bag secured with a rubber band.
    An excellent plastic bag for this purpose is a tough, 8-ounce-size baby bottle liner such as the "Playtex Nurser System Soft Bottle Liner." Avoid using a larger plastic bag since its wide mouth will collect more debris, which will eventually work its way down into the bag and into the Fuel Tube Bushing opening.

    In-the-bush operation...
    [ ] Fuel--use only white gas
    To minimize stove problems in cold weather, always use a stove that is capable of burning white gas--the fuel of choice for subzero expeditioning. White gas--a highly-refined, extremely-volatile naphtha--is essentially nothing more than automobile gasoline without tetraethyl lead and other additives. Sometimes referred to as Pressure Appliance Fuel, white gas is commonly sold under such trade names as Coleman Fuel, Blazo, Camplite, and MSR White Gas.
    Stoves dependent on compressed gases, or less-refined fuels such as paraffin-based kerosene and additive-laden automobile gasoline, are poor choices for cold-weather environments.
    When filling fuel bottles or tanks, leave enough air space--an inch or two if the fuel bottle or tank does not have a maximum fill line marked on its exterior--in the vessel so the pump can pressurize it (air compresses, liquid fuel does not).

    [ ] Fuel--use only recently-purchased fuel
    Always use fresh, recently purchased fuel. Old, degraded fuel is one of the most common reasons backpacking stoves malfunction. This is especially true at subzero temperatures when solvents, detergents, and moisture in degraded or contaminated fuel turn to sludge or freeze in the fuel pump, fuel line, generator tube, or the intricate jet assembly.

    [ ] Fuel--always filter fuel when filling fuel bottles
    When filling your fuel bottles, always pour the fuel--even fuel advertised as pre-filtered--through a felt filter so that any contaminants--like particulate matter (bits of metal from the manufacturing process), dirt and dust from atop the can, and moisture (condensation in the can)--are not admitted to the fuel bottle, the interior of which should be spotless from having been previously scrubbed out, as mentioned.
    A combined felt filter and funnel designed for this purpose is often available at stores that sell Coleman-brand fuel, stoves, and lanterns. Once such funnel--called the Coghlan's Filter Funnel, item no. 87964--is available from Campmor at http://www.campmor.com 1-888-226-7667.

    [ ] Fuel pump--carry pump installed in fuel bottle
    To prevent damage to the fuel pump housing as well as prevent debris and other contaminants from getting inside the fuel bottle during the repeated installation and removal of the fuel pump, leave the fuel pump installed in the fuel bottle for the duration of a trip.
    To reduce the chance of leakage while underway, bleed off any pressure by holding bottle vertically--with the fuel pump up--and loosing pump. Retighten the pump once the tank is depressurized.

    Fuel pump--cover fuel pump with a plastic bag
    To prevent debris from entering the fuel pump via the exposed Fuel Tube Bushing during a trip, cover the pump housing with a small, clean plastic bag secured with a rubber band.
    An excellent plastic bag for this purpose is a tough, 8-ounce-size baby bottle liner such as the "Playtex Nurser System Soft Bottle Liner." Avoid using a larger plastic bag since its wide mouth will collect more debris, which will eventually work its way down into the bag and into the Fuel Tube Bushing opening.

    [ ] Stove--cover exposed nipple end of fuel line with a plastic bag
    To prevent debris from entering the open end of the stove Fuel Line during transport, cover the open nipple end of the fuel line with a small, clean plastic bag secured with a rubber band.
    An excellent plastic bag for this purpose is a tough, 8-ounce-size baby bottle liner such as the "Playtex Nurser System Soft Bottle Liner." Avoid using a larger plastic bag since its wide mouth will collect more debris, which will eventually work its way down into the bag and into the Fuel Line.

    [ ] Repair manual--waterproof it
    Always carry an instruction/repair manual for your stove. To make sure your MSR repair manual is intact and legible when you need it most, waterproof it as you do your field maps and carry it folded up in a tiny plastic bag with your repair kit. To learn more about waterproofing paper products, visit the Land Navigation Web page on this Web site at and read the map waterproofing section.
    Replacement instruction/repair manuals for MSR stoves can be viewed or downloaded in a PDF-type file format by visiting MSR's Web site athttp://www.msrcorp.com and going to their "support" and "stove" Web page at http://www.msrcorp.com/support/stoves.asp.

    [ ] Repair kit--carry a well-stocked one
    Always carry a fully-stocked repair kit for your MSR stove. Inventory the contents of your repair kit to make sure it is not missing any critical items.
    MSR stove repair kits can be obtained from Recreational Equipment Inc., (REI) at http://www.rei.com, 1-800-426-4840, Campmor athttp://www.campmor.com, 1-800-230-2153, or from your local MSR dealer, which you can locate by visiting MSR's "dealer search" Web page at http://www.msrcorp.com/dealer_locator/.

    [ ] Repair kit--beef up kit with 6 extra Fuel Tube O-Rings
    The Fuel Tube O-Ring--which is held in place in the Fuel Bottle Pump by the Fuel Tube Bushing--is easily damaged (torn or broken) when inserting the nipple of the metal fuel line into the pump, especially in extremely cold weather when it is hard and inflexible.
    While MSR points this out in its stove manuals--"Below about -10 F O-rings may become inflexible and may leak or break--few owners know about this inherent problem or prepare for it. Once damaged, not only will precious fuel be lost during operation, a fire or explosion may occur. Since this part--the Fuel Tube O-Ring--is so easily damaged in cold weather and so critical to the operation of the stove, you should add several more, perhaps a half dozen, to your stove repair kit.
    The Fuel Tube O-ring--MSR item no. 429134--is sold in a package of 10 for about $6.00 and can be ordered through your local MSR dealer, which you can locate by visiting MSR's "dealer search" Web page athttp://www.msrcorp.com/dealer_locator/.

    [ ] Stove--lubricate nipple of Fuel Line each and every time you assemble stove
    Every time you insert the nipple end of the stove fuel line into the fuel pump, make sure you lubricate the nipple to prevent tearing the Fuel Tube O-ring in the fuel pump. If you lubricate the fuel line nipple with a light coating of MSR Pump Cup Oil, saliva, nose grease, margarine, lip balm, sunscreen, first-aid cream, or other non-petroleum-based oil, and you gently work (rotate) the fuel line into the pump housing, you should be able to avoid tearing this O-ring--which is especially easy to do in subzero weather--as mentioned above.


    [ ] Stove efficiency--use a wide, blackened pot with a tight-fitting lid
    A wide-based pot with a blackened exterior (a dark surface absorbs more heat than a shiny, reflective surface, so blacken the pot over a fire or by coating it flat-black, heat-resistant stove paint) and a tight-fitting lid can dramatically improve stove efficiency, reducing both boil times and fuel consumption.

    [ ] Stove safety--prime & preheat your stove safely & properly
    To properly pre-heat your MSR stove, follow the manufacturers instructions. On many MSR stoves, this involves opening the fuel valve until liquid gas is visible in the priming cup--sometimes called the spirit cup--beneath the stove (gas should wet priming cup, not fill it to the rim). After shutting off the fuel valve, light the fuel--or the fuel-laden priming wick or pad on some models--in the priming cup. In extremely cold weather, it may be necessary to relight the fuel once or twice before it will stay lit.
    Once lit, make sure the priming flame rising from the priming cup makes near-continuous contact with the generator tube--the curved fuel line protruding through the top of the stove, just above the burner--for several minutes. The generator tube is designed to absorb heat from the priming flame--and the burner when it is lit--in order to vaporize the liquid fuel flowing through it.
    To identify a stove's generator tube--or fuel vaporizing chamber--follow the stove line from the pump to its terminus beneath the jet assembly. The generator tube will be that portion of the fuel line that lies closest to the stove burner.
    If the priming flame from the priming cup is not licking the generator tube, possibly because a slight breeze is pushing the priming flame to one side, rotate the stove and adjust the heat shield until the flame engulfs the generator tube. If the flame does not preheat the generator tube to a sufficient temperature, the stove will not operate properly: you'll see dangerous, uncontrolled yellow or orange flames leaping a foot or two above the stove when the fuel is turned on instead of very low, concentrated blue flames.
    Improper priming and preheating is typically one of the most problematic and dangerous issues for wilderness trippers using MSR stoves, even longtime owners. As mentioned above, the solution is simple: know where the generator tube is situated on your stove and then make sure the priming flame engulfs it.
    Another priming option--especially for stoves without a priming cup, such as the Coleman-brand Peak 1 stove--is to apply a priming paste (or fire-starting paste) just below the generator tube and light it. Once the generator tube is preheated, the stove can then be lit.
    Priming or fire-starting paste--packaged in a tube like toothpaste--can be found at many sporting goods stores. Marketed as both a fire-starting paste and a stove priming paste, "Coghlan's Fire Paste"
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •