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Thread: generator price/power???

  1. #1
    Member BucknRut's Avatar
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    Question generator price/power???

    I need some input on generator prices. I would really like a nice Honda, but budget is only allowing for a used Briggs. I am capable of doing the research, but I am so pressed for time and I figure someone can give me an idea.

    I found a used 2250 watt Coleman with a B&S engine. I know the fellow that owns it now. It is in good running condition and well taken care of with proper maintanence. It's one of the old green ones, but sounds good. He is asking $100 or make an offer. Deal or No Deal?? What should one expect to pay if purchased up there?

    I personally would like something with a little more output, but time is running short. Will I be able to run my power tools with this?

    Thanks for the help!! It is much appreciated!!

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    You need to figure out exactly what you'll be using it for before deciding on a genset. Gensets seem to fall into two classes, those used occasionally and those used constantly. For constant use it would be worth getting one with a honda mill.

    I haven't looked at the cheaper gensets lately, but as I recall Costco had them for under $500, possible $300, but I think closer to $500.

    If that genset is in good shape, I'd get it for $100. You should have no problem selling it for what you paid for it, possibly even more.

    I presume you're looking at power for building a house or cabin vs producing electricity for remote living? I'd personally lean towards a chainsaw and handtools for remote building, and for remote power I'd go with a diesel genset.

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    Buck,

    Here's what I've experienced myself. My Yamaha 3800 watt generator with a 50' standard cord will just barely start my pancake compressor. It'll run a Skil saw just fine even when the compressor is running but the compressor start-up is a challenge. In fact if the Skil saw is running and the compressor tries to start? Blown breaker or stalled compressor, every time. If you plan to use a generator for work I'd suggest a 6kw minimum, especially if you plan to use a compressor big enough to push framing nailers. And figure for some heavy gauge cords, too. Diesel gensets are great for stationary use but they don't make good portables.

    Honda and Yamaha generators are expensive to buy but they'll save you money in the long run. My Yamaha 3800 is 16 years old and has tons of time on it. The total repair bills in 16 years are easy to calculate. $2.75 for a new vacuum hose, and that included installation at the Yamaha Shop. Otherwise it's been perfect and it still starts and runs like it did when it was new.

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    Member akjw7's Avatar
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    Do you think you old yammie is still going strong because it's that old? i.e., they don't build them like they used to? just curious if you think a brand new is the same quality as the bullet proof old one you have?

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    Quote Originally Posted by akjw7 View Post
    Do you think you old yammie is still going strong because it's that old? i.e., they don't build them like they used to? just curious if you think a brand new is the same quality as the bullet proof old one you have?
    All I can speak of is how mine has worked. I have no reason to believe the current models are of lessor quality.

  6. #6
    Member BucknRut's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Thanks!

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    You need to figure out exactly what you'll be using it for before deciding on a genset. Gensets seem to fall into two classes, those used occasionally and those used constantly. For constant use it would be worth getting one with a honda mill.

    I haven't looked at the cheaper gensets lately, but as I recall Costco had them for under $500, possible $300, but I think closer to $500.

    If that genset is in good shape, I'd get it for $100. You should have no problem selling it for what you paid for it, possibly even more.

    I presume you're looking at power for building a house or cabin vs producing electricity for remote living? I'd personally lean towards a chainsaw and handtools for remote building, and for remote power I'd go with a diesel genset.
    At the moment, I am just looking to power a 6x12 enclosed cargo trailer that I have converted into what will be my "home" for the trip up and a month or 2 until I find work and a place to rent. The only major pull will be on the microwave, (I don't anticipate having to run the AC). The rest is just everyday use and battery charger (I will have my truck rigged so that it charges the deep cycles in the trailer while I am driving and I will have solar panels hooked up too so not a big deal there. Aside from that, I might want to power a few portable tools.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    Buck,

    Here's what I've experienced myself. My Yamaha 3800 watt generator with a 50' standard cord will just barely start my pancake compressor. It'll run a Skil saw just fine even when the compressor is running but the compressor start-up is a challenge. In fact if the Skil saw is running and the compressor tries to start? Blown breaker or stalled compressor, every time. If you plan to use a generator for work I'd suggest a 6kw minimum, especially if you plan to use a compressor big enough to push framing nailers. And figure for some heavy gauge cords, too. Diesel gensets are great for stationary use but they don't make good portables.

    Honda and Yamaha generators are expensive to buy but they'll save you money in the long run. My Yamaha 3800 is 16 years old and has tons of time on it. The total repair bills in 16 years are easy to calculate. $2.75 for a new vacuum hose, and that included installation at the Yamaha Shop. Otherwise it's been perfect and it still starts and runs like it did when it was new.
    Thanks Pid, I never would have guessed that there would be that kind of strain on 3800, let alone a 2250! I found a similar gen that is a 6250 for $250, but I am not sure if it is still up for grabs. I may buy this one just to get my by for now while the pennies aren't real shiny

    Thanks fellas, I will let you know how it performs...I love "try before you buy" deals!!

    -Buck

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    Default Check this one

    An important consideration when buying a generator is the maximum load you plan to add to it. For example, in the link below you will notice what is called "starting power." All motors' greatest load to a generator is the starting power it needs at the beginning. Once the motor is running, the power draw comes down to a "running" power.
    http://mayberrys.com/honda/generator...quirements.htm

  8. #8
    Member akfarmer's Avatar
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    Default Generator recomendations

    I have lived off the grid for > 10 years and have found that the best generator for extended use is a low speed diesel powered generator. I have a 12 Kw Northern Lights generator that has over 15,000 hours of run time on the gen set without a major overhaul. This generator is probably not the gen set that you will want primarily because of the initial cost of about 8k. You will probably want a smaller portable gasoline generator. The best smaller unit that I have had, cost / output, is a generator with a Honda engine with a off brand generator. These can be difficult to find, but usually are about $600- $700 for a 3500 watt unit. The Honda engine delivers good fuel economy with extended reliability. Normally the first thing to fail in the small generators is the gasoline engine, thus it makes sense to utilize a quality engine with a genaric generator. I have had good luck with both Honda and Yamaha generators , but they tend to be more expensive than the hybrid unit. The Briggs and Stratton engines are loud, consume a lot more fuel, and do not last as long as a better engine. Selecting a generator is just a function of determining your maximum peak demand load, budget, and reliability requirements. Your $100 generator may suit your needs, but will not last and it will be expensive to operate.

    Good Luck !

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