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Thread: Whats your favorite style of halibut sinker ?

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    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
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    Default Whats your favorite style of halibut sinker ?

    I know this has a lot to do with where/how you fish and what weights are most popular. What other style/type/weight of sinker would you guys like to see available.

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    Member hoose35's Avatar
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    I use primarily cod style sinkers. 1 and 2 pounders.
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    We fish a wide range of depths and currents. We use cannon balls exclusively, all sizes from 1 oz to 32 oz.

    Haven't felt the need for other styles or heavier models in our fishing (Kodiak), but I'm always interested in new styles and any benefits. As for heavier? If the situation calls for more than 32, we have the great good fortune to fish elsewhere. I'm not sure there's even a local source for heavier than 32. Biggest seller in local shops is 16.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hoose35 View Post
    I use primarily cod style sinkers. 1 and 2 pounders.
    X2. 1's and 2's in the cod style. They stay put on deck and don't roll all over the place like cannon balls. If I need more than 2's it's time to pull the anchor and troll for kings.

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    I've got some that are made from filling part of a toilet paper tube surrounded in sand with hot lead.......about a pound and like the cod sinkers, they don't roll around.

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    I just came across these yesterday. I think they would work awesome in Cook Inlet waters with the big tides. Or anywhere else when fishing a rip. Very little drag and could get away with alot less weight to stay down. They are available in many different sizes of weights. I remember when tuff line came out and how much better it cut through the water than dacron did. I may have to give these a try.

    http://m.ebay.com/itm/371308474779?nav=SEARCH

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    I use 1 lb - 3 lb. I prefer the cod style to balls, but use both. I will be trying 3 lb fish shaped downrigger weights this year to see if they help much with blowback in fast water. I don't expect much help because I am usually fishing with a 1 lb gob of bait.

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    Member Jack in Alaska's Avatar
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    Cod style mostly 1 & 2 lbs. occasionally 3 lbs. No rolling aroiund

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    WOW. if those had some fixed eyes in each end I bet a 2 or 3 lb one would work great even in a heavy flow. We typically use 1' and 2's but will fish a 3 if the bite is on really good.

    Quote Originally Posted by theultrarider View Post
    I just came across these yesterday. I think they would work awesome in Cook Inlet waters with the big tides. Or anywhere else when fishing a rip. Very little drag and could get away with alot less weight to stay down. They are available in many different sizes of weights. I remember when tuff line came out and how much better it cut through the water than dacron did. I may have to give these a try.

    http://m.ebay.com/itm/371308474779?nav=SEARCH
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    cod style for me, in 3 and 4 and 5 , anyone know where I can get some 6#???

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    I know, jigs not sinkers, but I greatly prefer jigging to soaking bait. I have a few cod sinkers on board for times that we're anchored up and just in case we'll drop some bait while eating lunch to see if we catch something. But I've found jigs more productive and for a given tidal rip you can hold bottom with a lighter jig vs. a sinker and bait.
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    Quote Originally Posted by POLE BENDER View Post
    ....anyone know where I can get some 6#???
    There are certainly 6# downrigger balls, as well as 4's and 3's. Molds for them too.

    Speaking of downriggers, anyone tried clipping their halibut lines to their downriggers and sending to the bottom? Tried it a couple of times, and it sure makes retrieval easy for bait checks, and no weight when fighting fish.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    There are certainly 6# downrigger balls, as well as 4's and 3's. Molds for them too.

    Speaking of downriggers, anyone tried clipping their halibut lines to their downriggers and sending to the bottom? Tried it a couple of times, and it sure makes retrieval easy for bait checks, and no weight when fighting fish.
    Yes, I have. Usually when we first anchor and discover we got to the spot a little early and the tide is still ripping. Good way to get a scent trail started. I used to do that with a rod and whatever weight it took, sometimes 5 or 6 lbs. Using the downrigger is much easier.

    I also know a couple of guys that don't fish much for big halibut and don't have the tackle, that fish off their downriggers (hook/leader clipped to the ball) on the rare occasion when they want to try to put a big one in the boat. Put a little Shimano drag grease on the downrigger drags and I guess the drags are pretty smooth!

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    If 12oz won't hold bottom I'm moving or using riggers.
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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    I use the cod sinkers mostly. I make my own from 1#-5# but anymore I don't fish if I need more than 3#
    I make my own cannonballs as well. Whats nice about the canonballs is I can make them in different sizes that are not available in the Cod sinkers.
    sizes like 1 -1/2# and 1-1/4# 2-1/2# etc.
    If 1# wont hold I can go up 1/4# or 1/2# instead of going up a full pound at a time if I don't need to.
    And since mine have stainless eyes instead of Brass they are as prone to bend over when they get bounced around in the box.
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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by theultrarider View Post
    I just came across these yesterday. I think they would work awesome in Cook Inlet waters with the big tides. Or anywhere else when fishing a rip. Very little drag and could get away with alot less weight to stay down. They are available in many different sizes of weights. I remember when tuff line came out and how much better it cut through the water than dacron did. I may have to give these a try.

    http://m.ebay.com/itm/371308474779?nav=SEARCH
    I just bought the molds for these style sinkers from 3/4oz to 32oz. After Charlies post on his setup I have to try them.
    Very similar to the ones you linked to.
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    Quote Originally Posted by kasilofchrisn View Post
    I just bought the molds for these style sinkers from 3/4oz to 32oz. After Charlies post on his setup I have to try them.
    Very similar to the ones you linked to.


    Your using them for trolling ?? i'd think they would roll away if bottom fishing.

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    Sweet Chris! Get some made up and I'll have to buy some from you 16 and 24 oz. Post up when you've got some or pm me.

    Steve. When bottom fishing halibut I don't just let it lay on the bottom. You hit bottom and come up a crank or two. The lack of water resistance on a weight that shape should allow you to use half the weight you would otherwise need to stay down.

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    Quote Originally Posted by theultrarider View Post
    Sweet Chris! Get some made up and I'll have to buy some from you 16 and 24 oz. Post up when you've got some or pm me.

    Steve. When bottom fishing halibut I don't just let it lay on the bottom. You hit bottom and come up a crank or two. The lack of water resistance on a weight that shape should allow you to use half the weight you would otherwise need to stay down.
    Technically, the least surface area to volume (in this case weight) scenario would actually be a sphere......although one would think a long round one would be better, the only way to reduce it further would be to have a pancake style sinker that somehow stays skinny side to the current. Some jigs take advantage of this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Catch It View Post
    Technically, the least surface area to volume (in this case weight) scenario would actually be a sphere......although one would think a long round one would be better, the only way to reduce it further would be to have a pancake style sinker that somehow stays skinny side to the current. Some jigs take advantage of this.
    Exactly. And in the case of being anchored in a moving tide, the weight will end up horizontal since the nose is being held in place by the rod, and the bait is swinging the tail of the weight down current. Thus being long and skinny just like fishing a jig. It would have a very small profile for resistance to water. If it were to hang verticle I would agree with you.

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