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Thread: Rainbow/dolly flies for Anchorage area

  1. #1
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    Default Rainbow/dolly flies for Anchorage area

    Hey everyone. I just got to start some actual fly fishing while on vacation in VA and I'd like to keep it going now that things are about to thaw out a bit. I'll be visiting a local shop as soon as I get back home (I'm still in VA) but I wanted to do a little research in the mean time. What I'd like to know is what sort of insect hatches are common in the Anchorage area and what flies should I look into for trout? I have a 5wt set-up. I'm still learning the basics so any other good info is appreciated. I won't ask for any secret fishing spots but are any local rivers fishable right now? Thanks for any help, and sorry if these questions are a bit repetitive!

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    Member cod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TDent1 View Post
    Hey everyone. I just got to start some actual fly fishing while on vacation in VA and I'd like to keep it going now that things are about to thaw out a bit. I'll be visiting a local shop as soon as I get back home (I'm still in VA) but I wanted to do a little research in the mean time. What I'd like to know is what sort of insect hatches are common in the Anchorage area and what flies should I look into for trout? I have a 5wt set-up. I'm still learning the basics so any other good info is appreciated. I won't ask for any secret fishing spots but are any local rivers fishable right now? Thanks for any help, and sorry if these questions are a bit repetitive!
    We have a flesh fly hatch and a plastic bead hatch that happens nearly all yr long. Check the regs for available rivers to fish.
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!

  3. #3

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    I've had great luck with an array of dry, nymph and streamer patterns. I'd sure stop by Mossy's and have a chat with him once you get back. The right folks are passing through his shop all the time.

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    I would like to know 3 things # 1 time of year you will be here # 2 Anchorage area DEFINE the AREA, local or travel #3 lakes or rivers ?
    it is a little different FLY'S on lakes or rivers ,

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    Thanks for the replies guys. I'm excited to check out Mossy's.

    Sid, to answer your questions I live here and would fish all year if possible. I live in Eagle River and I'd like to fish rivers mostly but will probably get some lake gear too. For now I don't want to travel too far. Just trying to learn the right techniques and get a feel for a new kind of fishing but I don't mind driving an hour or hour and a half away for day trips.

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    I second the recommendation to stop at Mossy's fly shop in Anchorage.. Great shop and great people. Will definitely give you good advice.
    If you are heading north from Eagle River stop in at Three Rivers fly shop in Wasilla. Also a good store that will share local wisdom and recommendations.


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    Member theultrarider's Avatar
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    I used to have a ball with dry flies on the base lakes way back in the day. They would take a mosquito laying on top of the water easily. Dry flies are so much fun when you can get the fish to raise and take them.

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    I had two brown trout in VA rise to a dry fly. They were both very small fish but it was awesome to watch. Mosquitos are pretty awful around the lakes on base but I suppose that's a good thing for us fishermen!

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    Member Raffpappy's Avatar
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    Welcome to the money pit that is fly fishing! IMO, you'll get more fish and bigger fish on streamers and nymphs than you will on dries. This pertains to both rivers and stillwater, especially during the spring when water is cold and hatches are still skinny. Hare's ears, copper johns, and pheasant tail nymphs are great basic patterns that replicate a lot of sub-surface food sources. Larger patterns that I've had great success with in Alaska are wooly buggers, skip nymphs, damsel and dragonfly nymphs. Trout and char go nuts when the damsels and dragon flies arrive on scene! All of these are basic patterns that would work just about anywhere in the state. And in many cases you'll need multiple lines for various scenarios.....floating, sink, sink tip. A spare spool can solve that. Good luck and have fun with it!

  10. #10

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    How would you fish the nymphs? Just stick two on a leader then attach a glorified bobber to see if anything hits?

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    Quote Originally Posted by zxjonathan View Post
    How would you fish the nymphs? Just stick two on a leader then attach a glorified bobber to see if anything hits?
    Fishing 2 at the same time could land you a citation. Most trout waters are SINGLE hook only. Check the regs.

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    Member Raffpappy's Avatar
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    There are so many options that they are hard to list! I like to swing nymphs on rivers and streams but will often use a strike indicator to drift an offering into a deep hole. Small split shot is sometimes necessary. As for lakes I use both sinking and floating lines to fish nymph, streamer and chironomid patterns. Once the hatches start I primarily use the floating line to fish the chironomid patterns (pupa) under a small foam indicator, usually within a couple feet of the bottom. Once trout and char target them it's the most effective technique, IMO! Of course it takes some time and experimenting to determine the color they want at that time, and successive hatches can change that. I'm still amazed every time I slip a size 18 barbless chironomid pattern from the snout of large trout. I also use the floating line to fish nymph patterns in shallow water, say 6-8' deep. 10' feet or more water depth then I switch to my type IV sinking line. Fish go nuts on damsel and dragonfly nymphs fished deep and stripped to the surface. Do a lot of research and experiment a lot. What worked on Friday might be off the menu on Saturday!

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