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Thread: Continuous vs Variable Deadrise

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    Member patrickL's Avatar
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    Default Continuous vs Variable Deadrise

    My wife and I are still on the hunt for a bigger boat than our previous Hewescraft. We're looking at something in the 28ft range. I've found a couple of boats and came across one with a continuous deadrise. From what I understand the variable deadrise will handle big seas better but the continuous takes less power to plane and stay on plane so is more fuel efficient. From my understanding the difference is not all that big between either in this size range but I wanted to see what experiences people have had. Any thoughts?

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I don't think it's as simple as saying a variable deadrise will take bigger seas and require more power to plane, you have to look at the effective deadrise of the variable vs. a fixed deadrise as well as the displacement of the hull and the beam of the hull. Lets say you found a 28' boat with a deeper continuous V that displaced 12,000 pounds, my gut tells me a 28' boat with an 8 1/2' beam with a shallower variable deadrise that displaced 8,000 pounds is going to be much more fuel efficient, but the lighter boat with the shallower variable V isn't going to cut through the rough stuff nearly as well as the heavier boat.
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    Member patrickL's Avatar
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    Fair point. Guess I was in a rush when I posted. If I remember correctly, one boat is a 28ft x 9.5ft beam with continuous 18 degree deadrise. The other is a 28ft x 10ft beam which has a variable deadrise and 18 degrees at the stern. I'm just trying to get an idea of the tradeoffs.

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    remember the 10ft width will cost ya 300 bucks to get through the tunnel.

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    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by potbuilder View Post
    remember the 10ft width will cost ya 300 bucks to get through the tunnel.
    10 foot is still $35. Greater than 10 foot and the price goes up.
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    Member patrickL's Avatar
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    Thanks boys for clarifying. I keep going back and forth myself about that. I'd also hate to buy something and find out it's gonna cost me way more than I originally thought.

    But anyway....I'm still wondering what I'd lose by going with a continuous deadrise vs a variable. Any experiences?

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    It takes more power to push a deep V hull than a flater (modified) V but the ride is better in rough water. Variable deadrise (both fore-aft and keel to chine) attempt to get the best of both worlds. A sharp V forward/at the keel flatening out aft/towards the chine (variable deadrise) will be more economical for the same size and weight and give a decent ride in moderately rough water, though slowing down certainly helps. Most small boats these days are variable deadrise. One other attribute of a deep V (say 28 degrees at the transom) is it will roll at rest in a sea. Hulls are a compromise. They can't do everything and the only way to really tell if a boat will meet your expectations is to take it for a ride in the kind of seas you'll encounter and what you want to do when you get to where you're going.

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