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Thread: Inflammatory lube question... LOL...

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    Default Inflammatory lube question... LOL...

    OK ...I'm about out of lube and revisiting the topic again. In the bad ol' days, I used Outers ...the stuff that comes in cheap cleaning kits. Then I discovered how well Corrosion X works (boat trailer springs and hitches, outdoor hinges - including on squeeky vehicle doors, padlocks used outdoors year 'round etc), and since they sold a light gun lube ...I used that for a long time. It works very well at preventing corrosion (better for example, than Corrosion Block). Nobody ships Corrosion X gun lube to Alaska (that I know of). I tried teflon lubes when in Fairbanks and had semi-autos seize up in sub-zero conditions ...and good ol' WD-40 always worked, so I used WD-40 for awhile ...that's the inflammatory part of this question ...I've seen a few posts that seemed pretty critical of the stuff ...which is fine. I'm here to get educated.

    So, for me, the jury is still out. Which lube is best for hand guns? Any reason to use something different on revolvers versus semi-autos? And finally, for the 'hidden inside the sideplate' parts on revolvers and/or hidden components of semi-autos ...what's the best way to clean and lube them (short of semi-annual disassemblies) - Or is BreakOut followed by letting drops (or spray?) lube to settle in good enough?

    OK ...let the opinions fly! I just had shoulder surgery and am out of commission for a bit, so I sent a couple of guns off to JRH for some tuning work and now is a good time to research the lube question....

    Brian

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    I have used Rem Lube (Rem Oil) for years with no issues and good results on all my long guns and handguns. I have tried the Rem Drilube in the winter with good results too but for just everyday use, summer and winter Rem Lube has worked well-- of course winter I wipe most everything almost dry but it leaves enough lube in the pores to work.
    I no longer pull the side plates on my revolvers, just let it settle in. (too many bad experiances with tiny parts and sharp edges)
    Now WD-40-- I use it to hose out my guns and then wipe it off and apply Rem Lube. I have used WD-40 by the gallons on machine guns and other than the extra large flame it produces out of the feed tray cover, it worked! Oh and it worked in Fairbanks winters where other stuff failed. Long term effects to the metal? Dont know.
    Just my 2 cents
    Mike

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    Ballistol is a good one. White Lithium grease also.
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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    Read through this at your leisure. It's VERY informative:

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...gterm+gun+lube

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    "Inflammatory lube"...I thought this thread was about Preparation H...
    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence. Albert Einstein

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mobius View Post
    Read through this at your leisure. It's VERY informative:

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...gterm+gun+lube
    Awesome post. My beloved Corrosion X did well early, but fell off the cliff after a bit. Sad. I have some Hornady One Shot, but have never seen the WD-40 Specialist. I plan on looking for some Frog Lube and the WD-40 Specialist, and will try the Frog Lube on my guns... seems to be the best overall, if you let its superior lubrication capability rank as high as its anti-corrosion capabilities...

    Thanks, All!!! Great info...

    Brian

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    Quote Originally Posted by tananaBrian View Post
    OK ...I'm about out of lube and revisiting the topic again. In the bad ol' days, I used Outers ...the stuff that comes in cheap cleaning kits. Then I discovered how well Corrosion X works (boat trailer springs and hitches, outdoor hinges - including on squeeky vehicle doors, padlocks used outdoors year 'round etc), and since they sold a light gun lube ...I used that for a long time. It works very well at preventing corrosion (better for example, than Corrosion Block). Nobody ships Corrosion X gun lube to Alaska (that I know of). I tried teflon lubes when in Fairbanks and had semi-autos seize up in sub-zero conditions ...and good ol' WD-40 always worked, so I used WD-40 for awhile ...that's the inflammatory part of this question ...I've seen a few posts that seemed pretty critical of the stuff ...which is fine. I'm here to get educated.

    So, for me, the jury is still out. Which lube is best for hand guns? Any reason to use something different on revolvers versus semi-autos? And finally, for the 'hidden inside the sideplate' parts on revolvers and/or hidden components of semi-autos ...what's the best way to clean and lube them (short of semi-annual disassemblies) - Or is BreakOut followed by letting drops (or spray?) lube to settle in good enough?

    OK ...let the opinions fly! I just had shoulder surgery and am out of commission for a bit, so I sent a couple of guns off to JRH for some tuning work and now is a good time to research the lube question....

    Brian
    Corrosion protection, or lube? Those properties aren't always mutually inclusive. Forum member 'Rancid Crabtree' had a thread awhile back in which he performed a very impressive test of corrosion protection products. It's a highly recommended read. The hands down winner is not a lube.

    Lube is a different matter with lots of variables involved. For general purposes I like Amsiol Synthetic ATF. That's what I keep in the dispenser on my bench.
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    Quote Originally Posted by tananaBrian View Post
    Awesome post. My beloved Corrosion X did well early, but fell off the cliff after a bit. Sad. I have some Hornady One Shot, but have never seen the WD-40 Specialist. I plan on looking for some Frog Lube and the WD-40 Specialist, and will try the Frog Lube on my guns... seems to be the best overall, if you let its superior lubrication capability rank as high as its anti-corrosion capabilities...

    Thanks, All!!! Great info...

    Brian
    Couple things I'll pass along from my experience with Frog Lube. I've been using it for almost 3 years now. I use it on my competition/carry pistol religiously now. First, apply it exactly as the directions say. This is not a slather on and hope for the best. If you use too much it will gum up in cold weather and it will have the opposite effect from what you want. When you're done, it should actually look like you have nothing on your gun at all. Trust me, that's how it's supposed to look.

    Second, I'm having very bad luck with it on my AR. I really don't know why, but for some reason it won't cycle properly. I haven't ruled out user error yet, but last time I had the AR out with only Frog Lube, it choked and puked about every 5 rounds. I got so frustrated I dumped a bunch of M-Pro 7 in the action and haven't addressed it since. SO, there's that. Again, not a full blown knock on Frog Lube from me because I still think maybe I did something wrong.

    So it's a mixed bag here. I'm 100% sold on it for my competition pistol. But I haven't worked out the kinks on the semi-auto rifle end.

    ETA: heads up about WD-40 Specialist, there are several variants of it. The one Rancid used was Specialist Corrosion Inhibitor. There are other versions.

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    Interesting... makes me wonder, again, about lubrication of hidden parts that cannot easily be wiped 'dry' after lubing... FrogLube maybe not so good for that? Hmmmmmm......

    Brian


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    Quote Originally Posted by tananaBrian View Post
    Interesting... makes me wonder, again, about lubrication of hidden parts that cannot easily be wiped 'dry' after lubing... FrogLube maybe not so good for that? Hmmmmmm......

    Brian


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    Frog Lube does have a liquid formula as well. I only have the paste. So it's possible I didn't get all the important parts treated properly. I'm holding off re-doing the AR until I pick up some of the liquid for that reason. It's a bit of a production to clean off all the oils and prepare the parts for Frog Lube, so I'm not really motivated to do it. Maybe this summer when I'm REALLY bored I'll re-approach the AR.

    BUT, for my pistols? Done deal. I'll only use Frog Lube from now on. I know there are other equally good products, but I run 200-300 rounds a month in my beer league competitions and I clean my pistol about once a year. Ran it all winter and never had issues.

    I am serious about the cleaning schedule. After competition or practice, I run a bore snake down the barrel and wipe off the exposed parts with a paper towel. That's it. I'll break it down and actually clean it once a year maybe twice. LOL, it's still got GSR on the end of the slide right now. I should probably wipe that off.

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    I've wondered in the past about these threads regarding lubrication. And, what's behind the new emphasis on lubrication.

    Because, to me, most any so-called Gun Oil, or similar is plenty good, UNLESS it's WD 40, which gave me a problem when I sprayed it into the inner workings of a SA revolver. Later when I used the gun, it was all gritty and grindy when I pulled the hammer back, which I attributed, to the WD 40.

    It took a lot of spraying of cleaner, and more oil to get it back in working order, and it never felt the same after, anyway. ????

    But, back to the, to me, strange fascination with gun oil type, brand, etc. I thought it must have come about because of auto pistols and ARs, that are so popular nowadays. ????

    currently, I use Rig gun grease, Rig gun oil, various spray lubes, and even sewing machine oil. I've also used Kroil. In times past, I used most any old thin oil, with never a problem.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty of the North View Post
    I've wondered in the past about these threads regarding lubrication. And, what's behind the new emphasis on lubrication.

    Because, to me, most any so-called Gun Oil, or similar is plenty good, UNLESS it's WD 40, which gave me a problem when I sprayed it into the inner workings of a SA revolver. Later when I used the gun, it was all gritty and grindy when I pulled the hammer back, which I attributed, to the WD 40.

    It took a lot of spraying of cleaner, and more oil to get it back in working order, and it never felt the same after, anyway. ????

    But, back to the, to me, strange fascination with gun oil type, brand, etc. I thought it must have come about because of auto pistols and ARs, that are so popular nowadays. ????

    currently, I use Rig gun grease, Rig gun oil, various spray lubes, and even sewing machine oil. I've also used Kroil. In times past, I used most any old thin oil, with never a problem.

    Smitty of the North
    To be honest, if you want a petroleum derivative oil, a nice bottle of Mobile 1 synthetic and a tube of brake grease will probably cost less and last as long as any "gun" oil on the market. And I'll be up front here, that's what I used for a while.

    The only reason I switched to Frog Lube was because now I can clean the guns in the house without the cries of noxious fume induced headaches from the wife and kids. if not for that, I'd probably be using Mobile 1 again.

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    Corrosion-X at Polar Wire in Anchorage

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    RLK7 ...thanks! I didn't know Polar had it!

    I think I can draw some conclusions here ...

    1. As for why lube is being questioned ...it's more of a "why not", and for me anyway, has nothing to do with anything else ...I just happened to think "what about all those little parts that just get hosed out with solvent, followed by hopeful drips of oil going back into them?". Example: letting Hoppes #9 dribble into the hidden workings of a revolver, or using Break Away (whatever it's called) followed by some spray lube of some kind ...Is there grime collecting in there? Too much lube? Parts not lubricated because solvent cleaned them and the lube didn't reach them? One thing that I like about Corrosion X is that it is 'attracted' molecularly to the metal and tends to creep into the nooks and crannies that weren't hit by first application ...I put some in the tracks of a sliding door on our old van once, and was disappointed in how the stuff spread and spread ...way out onto the vinyl and other components that had never been lubed in the first place. The good thing for guns is that it creeps into all the joints, spring hooks, slides, and everything else ...even if all you did was 'get it close'. Or so it seems...

    2. I'm betting money that you could pick any of the top 10 lubes from the article by rancid someone, ranked for the best balance between lube capability and corrosion prevention (I've had some guns rust in the bore and other disappointing experiences), and they'd all work just fine as long as you at least clean and lube your gun a couple of times per year ...far less often than most of us clean and lube anyway, eh?

    3. I'm not entirely sure how important lube is on old-fashioned guns such as revolvers anyway, since they operate well even if entirely dry of all lube. I think they are pretty forgiving ...and you get extended life if you treat them right. For autos, some of them are a different story ...some operate dry just fine, while others need at least the "apply lube and wipe off all excess" amount of lube. Again ...even a modicum of care, maybe twice a year, is likely all you need for them too.

    4. Worst thing is to let a gun sit around (safe, gun case, under your bed) un-lubed for too long... cheap and quick to touch it up now and then, and that's all it needs ...and when done hunting in corrosive conditions (wet or salty) ...no problem. Clean and lube and leave all parts out to dry...

    Brian

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    Quote Originally Posted by tananaBrian View Post
    RLK7 ...thanks! I didn't know Polar had it!

    I think I can draw some conclusions here ...

    1. As for why lube is being questioned ...it's more of a "why not", and for me anyway, has nothing to do with anything else ...I just happened to think "what about all those little parts that just get hosed out with solvent, followed by hopeful drips of oil going back into them?". Example: letting Hoppes #9 dribble into the hidden workings of a revolver, or using Break Away (whatever it's called) followed by some spray lube of some kind ...Is there grime collecting in there? Too much lube? Parts not lubricated because solvent cleaned them and the lube didn't reach them? One thing that I like about Corrosion X is that it is 'attracted' molecularly to the metal and tends to creep into the nooks and crannies that weren't hit by first application ...I put some in the tracks of a sliding door on our old van once, and was disappointed in how the stuff spread and spread ...way out onto the vinyl and other components that had never been lubed in the first place. The good thing for guns is that it creeps into all the joints, spring hooks, slides, and everything else ...even if all you did was 'get it close'. Or so it seems...

    2. I'm betting money that you could pick any of the top 10 lubes from the article by rancid someone, ranked for the best balance between lube capability and corrosion prevention (I've had some guns rust in the bore and other disappointing experiences), and they'd all work just fine as long as you at least clean and lube your gun a couple of times per year ...far less often than most of us clean and lube anyway, eh?

    3. I'm not entirely sure how important lube is on old-fashioned guns such as revolvers anyway, since they operate well even if entirely dry of all lube. I think they are pretty forgiving ...and you get extended life if you treat them right. For autos, some of them are a different story ...some operate dry just fine, while others need at least the "apply lube and wipe off all excess" amount of lube. Again ...even a modicum of care, maybe twice a year, is likely all you need for them too.

    4. Worst thing is to let a gun sit around (safe, gun case, under your bed) un-lubed for too long... cheap and quick to touch it up now and then, and that's all it needs ...and when done hunting in corrosive conditions (wet or salty) ...no problem. Clean and lube and leave all parts out to dry...

    Brian
    1. Corrosion X is good stuff in some applications. Was never without it on the boats, but never considered it for the guns.

    2. Note that the best corrosion inhibitor in Rancid Crabtree's test was NOT A LUBE.

    3. Revolvers, especially heavy recoiling revolvers, should NEVER be fired without proper lube.

    4. Certainly.
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    I use whatever ATF I have on hand at the moment. A drop or two here and there and then wipe off any excess. It still works at 40 below but I haven't tried it much colder than that. We know it works in screaming hot transmissions. Any oil that can keep an automatic transmission full of clutches, bearings and bushings together for a couple hundred thousand miles has got to be a good lube and it doesn't get real stiff like a lot of lubes. A tear down and a soak in gasoline blown dry with compressed air every couple years has kept my 90 year old 1911 going strong.

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    NEVER regular WD-40, it drys and hardens. I have repaired bolt guns for others where the firing pins could not move. Nothing will dissolve the junk so it has to be removed mechanically.
    I use to spray the steel stands for my saws with it and they rusted very fast.
    The new stuff sounds good.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bfrshooter View Post
    NEVER regular WD-40, it drys and hardens. I have repaired bolt guns for others where the firing pins could not move. Nothing will dissolve the junk so it has to be removed mechanically.
    Simple Green, apply, place parts on a 9x11 cake pan and let sit in the sun a couple hours. No sun or its an extra bad case put pan in oven at 200f a couple hours. Sometimes you need to re-do a couple times.


    WD-40 is only a good gun oil (more of a coolant actually) for something like an M2 and its an awful corrosion inhibitor so . . . step away from the WD-40.
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbuck351 View Post
    I use whatever ATF I have on hand at the moment. A drop or two here and there and then wipe off any excess. It still works at 40 below but I haven't tried it much colder than that. We know it works in screaming hot transmissions. Any oil that can keep an automatic transmission full of clutches, bearings and bushings together for a couple hundred thousand miles has got to be a good lube and it doesn't get real stiff like a lot of lubes. A tear down and a soak in gasoline blown dry with compressed air every couple years has kept my 90 year old 1911 going strong.
    Well no, as automotive fluids go ATF is not very good at taking heat at all. ATF brakes down and permanently looses lubricity starting around 175f and by 250f you have caused substantial transmission damage which is why they have coolers on them. Contrast that to motor oil which normaly runs around 310f with smoke points more like 500f. But if you get the wear areas of the average gun to those temps your doing some serious shooting.
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