Results 1 to 17 of 17

Thread: Halibut terminal gear questions?

  1. #1

    Question Halibut terminal gear questions?

    I am looking to try some halibut fishing on my own this year. I have adequate rod and reels but would like some suggestions on hook size and type, leaders, weights, and general rigging. I will be fishing in PWS. DO most of you prefer circle hooks? I would be happy catching chickens but not sure what size hook to use?

  2. #2
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    I like to be able to change tackle as quickly as possible, so let's start at the rod. I use 50 and 80# super braid line. To reduce loss of strength at the knot I run the end of the line through a foot or so of 80# dacron. Then I attach a 4/0 barrel swivel, then 3' of 300# mono, then a 4/0 corkscrew swivel. You'll cut your hand if you try and grab superbraid, so the large dia mono allows you something to grab onto. The mono also provides some shock absorbtion to the nearly no stretch super braid. If you're fishing jigs, just choose one and put it on the corkscrew.

    I like lead heads with large grub tails or scampi tails, point wilson darts, crippled herring, gibbs and diamond jigs, in 6-24 oz. Jigs are great as they are always fishing, no bait to check, and even the heaviest jigs are 1/2 or more lighter than sinkers, so don't wear you out reeling up. You can put on a small piece upwards of 1/2 a herring to add sent, or douse the jig in herring oil to add scent. I replace treble hooks with 8/0 or 10/0 octopus hooks.

    If you're going to fish bait, I again use 300# mono. I put on a 4/0 barrel swivel, 12-18" of line with a slider to attach the sinker, another swivel, and 18-24" of line ending in a 16/0 circle hook. Even chickens will easily take a 16/0. From the slider I put on a drop line that I can loop through eye of the sinker. You could also use a corkscrew swivel in place of the slider. Attach 2, 3, 4 or 5# sinker, put the circle hook through the middle of the herring and drop er down.

    Try and keep everything as well layed out as possible with quick changes anywhere you need to change anything. Fishing time is limited enough as it is, you shouldn't be wasting your time on the boat tying lines or fiddling with gear.
    Last edited by Paul H; 06-19-2007 at 16:55. Reason: typo

  3. #3
    Member SoggyMountain's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Bait Station, Alaska 99801
    Posts
    861

    Default

    I want to use everything on the shelf! I like the Wally Whale Jigs that you can add scent to, and almost always attach a piece of herring to the hook as well.

    I like the spreaders that allow your weight to hit bottom while holding a baited circle hook up 6" or so.

    I'll use the big rubber fish and shrimp and just thread them with either a J hook or circle hook at the end.

    Two years ago I designed what I think is the world's best jig, but never got to use it and now it's lost do I have to make another I guess.... maybe I'll do that today!?

    I took a 6" long piece of threaded galvanized pipe in 2" dia. I drilled several small holes in it. Then, I drilled holes in the center of both end caps, threaded them on, and ran a steal leader up the center. I cut off the surplus leader leaving enough to crimp a loop on each end. On the "top" I just left a loop. The "bottom" had a big hook attached to the loop.

    Theory ..... you can open up the top, throw in some broken up herring, and jig away. Now you have weight, scent, and hook all in one. I called it a pipe bomb. If I make another, I'll take a picture..... especially if it is as effective as I think it will be.

  4. #4
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    I like your "pipe bomb" I'll have to try something similar. I have some scrap pieces of 1" stainless tubing that I'd planned to fill with lead to use in a similar vein, but I hadn't considered the bait compartment.

  5. #5
    Member SoggyMountain's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Bait Station, Alaska 99801
    Posts
    861

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    I like your "pipe bomb" I'll have to try something similar. I have some scrap pieces of 1" stainless tubing that I'd planned to fill with lead to use in a similar vein, but I hadn't considered the bait compartment.
    I think there is a reason the lure manufacturers never came up with the idea... THEN EVERYONE CAN MAKE THEM!

    Like I said, I lost mine, but I'll make another soon. It cost me about $10.00 or so in product.

    Between the weight of the steel, the hook, and the whiffle holes, it has the capacity to be a one-size-fits-all rig. The holes not only dissipate scent, they will flood the chamber so you have the weight to go all the way. And that big chunk of steel bong, bong, bonging on the bottom is sure to get some interest.

    So, if you beat me with my idea, I hope you'll give a report here. I would love to hear that it works according to my theory.

    One point - make sure to sand/file the entry/exit holes for the line...or, maye find some type of rubber ring to fit insid the bore so you don't fray your line on sharp metal.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Juneau, Alaska
    Posts
    284

    Default Pipe Bomb Idea

    Soggy - I've tried pretty much the same thing as your design, just a couple of inches longer. Only I added about a 15" length of green braided blackcod gangion twine on the end (with a large loop to easily change the hook)with a 16/0 or 20/0 circle hook and a big chunk of cod. Worked like a champ. The mashed-up herring in the body of the pipe spreads a scent trail that helps keep them interested.

    I use one of these on one line and spreaders on the others. I have to build a new supply of "Bombs" - lost my last two trying to collect blackcod out of some deep water and got pushed over into some "red tree coral". Bye-bye Bombs!

  7. #7
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Valdez, Alaska
    Posts
    4,403

    Default Canisters

    I kind of do the same thing but use film canisters. Hole in the top, string down through a hole in the bottom, back up throught another hole and out the lid again. A couple small drill holes in the side. Cut a piece of tanpon and place it in the canister with herring oil. It then gets snapped to the swivel.

    I imagine a plastic pill bottle would work the same.

    As far as keeping the bait off the bottom. When fishing blue fish in Glouster Mass. we used a weighted rig and a triple swivel. The one with the hook was about 18" long and had a sliding foam float. The float keep the bait up and off of the rocks. It should work the same for halibut.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
    Cancer from Agent Orange - Aug. 25th 2012
    Cancer Survivor - Dec. 14th 2012

  8. #8
    Member SoggyMountain's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Bait Station, Alaska 99801
    Posts
    861

    Default

    Well, on the one hand, it is nice to see other fishermen sharing the same general thought. On the other hand, I'm a little hurt by the fact that I'm not a type of genius. I was honestly laughing histarically when I created the "pipe bomb." <--- not the type of thing you'd post on a terrorist web site.

    Paul, I originally was concocting a "herring sleigh" that was going to allow me to troll without a weight or downdrigger. While contemplating the thought, and after jigging for halibut, I figured, "why not put it on steroids and just think BIG?"

    JKD, I KNEW I WAS ONTO SOMETHING!

    Dave, I like the float foam idea .... I might use something like that on a stinger line.

    Guys, I really think we have put the lure makers out of buisness on the bottom. Theory or not, it all sounds perfect!

  9. #9
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Valdez, Alaska
    Posts
    4,403

    Default Bigger is better

    I caught a 100 pounder once on a 18-20" cod that had already bit the bait and the halibut "hooked" onto the part of the remaining circle hook sticking out of the cods mouth.

    Bigger could be better!

    Bait casting bluefish rigg.
    http://allfishingrigs.com/catalog/pr...0b0026ebc9cca0

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
    Cancer from Agent Orange - Aug. 25th 2012
    Cancer Survivor - Dec. 14th 2012

  10. #10
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River/ Juneau
    Posts
    5,154

    Default

    Stop by B&J they'll set you strait
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  11. #11

    Question Thanks for the ideas?

    Thanks for the ideas Anyone care to share their opinions on circle hooks vs J hooks and recommend a sizes for all round halibut fishing?

  12. #12
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    4,925

    Default

    circle 18/0
    Line power pro 80#
    Leader 250# 5-50 cord line
    I carry 2 and 3# weights

    Rod lamiglass 5ft. with Penn 330gt
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

  13. #13
    Member SoggyMountain's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Bait Station, Alaska 99801
    Posts
    861

    Default

    I think both hooks work well. Circles are great when the fish sucks your bait. If I am leaving my line down, that's the hook I want. J hooks come in handy when jigging. I saw a guy put a J hook through the head of a 50 lb butt that was tinkering with his jig, but not taking it. Buy both, and have fun!

  14. #14
    Member akrstabout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,293

    Default Soggy

    you didn't by chance lose it on the homer docks wednesday the 20th of this month did you? They had the docks closed for half an hour when somebody called over the radio there was something on the middle ramp that looked like a pipe bomb. Sure enough it was a pipe bomb. Just wonder now if it was somebody's home made contraption for fishing.

    But to the whole bait and scent idea. I make my own stuff. Similar to Daveinthebush's idea with the tampon. I bought some B-2 squid shells, put them on 300# mono. pushed them up and then wire tied on a piece of oil absorbant white cloth like stuff. It is only good for oil, after awhile saltwater might penetrate it but just keep it lubed when you do a bait check. This way you are not buying female products to go fishing. You are supposed to have the oil pads on your boat anyways. I just cut of a small strip and put to use. Hope that helps. Yep B&J will set you straight and give you answers. Was there last week and bought $90 worth of stuff. I told them what I was doing and they seemed like they thought I was retarded. But hey it works with grubs and stuff I buy there. But Alfonso mentioned something and it make sense I just never thought of it. It increased my production rate greatly. I have thought about selling the rigs I make and taking one to them so they can see what I meant. Good guys in there though.

  15. #15
    Member SoggyMountain's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Bait Station, Alaska 99801
    Posts
    861

    Default

    Not my "pipe bomb." Mine was on a boat in Juneau that belonged to a friend. He sold the boat, and I think the "contraption" went with it. No doubt there is someone down here landing barn-door after barn-door with my missing jig!

  16. #16

    Default

    guess my rigs are much simplier.

    pull off about a wingspans worth of the green gangion line.

    tie a smaller loop in one end. I use a double surgeons knot to make both the hook and snap loop ends.

    4 to 8"es or so, slide on a large barrel swivel, now tie a double overhand knot to lock it in place. Lastly snap on a large roscoe snap

    Hook end tie a larger loop. The loop has to fit around your circle hook whatever size that is. I now much prefer the owners. They aint cheap, you'll definatly stick more fish with them!!!! I believe (don't quote me on it) I'm running the 12/0's. Was running 16/0 mustad and a 16/0 owner is HUGE in comparison. bigger hook gap, sharper hook, more hook ups!!!!

    You want to run the hook loop of the green gangion line up through the bottom of the circle hook, over the top and around. Rig it backwards and you wont hook as many fish!!!

    To keep it off the bottom, reel it up a couple of turns. All the rigs in the world wont keep you from snagging if you leave your weight laying on the bottom. Typically I like my gangion line long enough between the ends to keep cl ients from reeling fish out of the water, I have shortened it some. So take that distance and figure out what that relates to a couple of turns on the reel after touch down. Spreaders are nice to keep rigs from tangling. Dont drop so fast and watch how you rig your baits and they USUALLY, not always, wont tangle.

    For stubborn days, when there's little swell and the fish are biting but not moving with it. We have a rig. It's basically a HUGE mooching rig. A salmon belly for bait, or large herring, or guts, but the belly strip works perfectly! Send it down. When it gets hit, wait a second then stickem hard!

    If you think of it, bring a mill ******* file and touch up all these hooks. They maybe large, but from all the hooks I've tired other then the owners, they ARE NOT sharp by any means.

    So from the rod down. I also run 80lb izorline spectra. Palmored off to a large barrel swivel with a roscoe snap. The leader snaps right on, bait the hook and go fish. If you've never used a roscoe there is a trick to using that is much harder to type then it is to do, more so with the jigs and weights then the gangion loop. The reason I dont use the curl style snap swivels is I have had them come off. Try and explain that one to a client "Oh this happens once in awhile though it's pretty rare"! It's not something I'd want to hear, so I dont use it for salmon or halibut.

    Definatly no secrets but it does work and it works well and it's something you'll see on most of the charter boats around here.

    Lastly, to deal with the spectra for running line. Whoever made that comment of it cutting you up bad is spot on. Jigging is typically when I get eatin up bad with line cuts while fishing lingcod. WEAR RUBBER GLOVES!!!! I prefer the blue style vs the orange gloves. They're a little more durable I believe, fit better and are just plumb more comfortable. On the halibut rigs with spectra as your running line. A longer leader of gangion material also fixes the problem of even touching the main line (which would also disqualify you from any kind of record if you ever were into that thing). Have the rod person turn the rod so the tip is right alongside the boat with the fish coming as close as possible (dead current situation, use you're best judgement hear). I typically take the shark hook or gaff (we dont shoot our big butts either), and get it under the weight if I can't grab it by hand. As the fish comes up the shark hook goes in the mouth if the fish is big enough. If it's a chicken, buy yourself a hayhook and be done with it. It'll work extremely well even on larger halibut as long as you can gettem over the rail.

    Hope it helps. Gotta go work on the boat.

  17. #17
    Member sayak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Central peninsula, between the K-rivers
    Posts
    5,790

    Default Good grief!

    How did people in the old days ever catch anything without all that technology?

    I have fished (and successfully I might add) with many fishing buddies over the years who cleaned up on the halibut with just a lot of old gear and frozen/re-frozen herring. We didn't know any better than to just have strong lines and sharp hooks! Makes me wonder...

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •