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Thread: used Wooldridge 29 pilot

  1. #1

    Default used Wooldridge 29 pilot


  2. #2
    Member hoose35's Avatar
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    Nice boat. What's up with a 100 gallon tank? That seems like an awful small tank for a boat that size.
    Responsible Conservation > Political Allocation

  3. #3

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    That's a great boat... I bet I could find away to add another 100-120 gallons of fuel... with 220 gallons and the yami 150's PWS is yours...as long as your not in a hurry. I'm usually out 7-10 days, this boat would be great for that kind of use with more fuel capacity.

    The NW builders are weekend and day boaters... the way they set up their designs reflects that.

    My woolie 20' IBJ came with a large fuel tank, 60 gal, 40 gal was standard. It can now carry 200 gal. My Hewes came with 156 gal and now has 223 gal. If this is the boat for you besides for the fuel capacity, adding more fuel can probably be done.

  4. #4

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    150 Yammies will go thru 100 in less than a day. Those guys must be fast fishermen!!!
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  5. #5

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    Big Jim
    I can burn 35 gals/hr or 11gal/hr, depends whether I go 20 MPH or 35+MPH. I have a similar sized boat with the same engines, I can travel 18-20MPH and exceed 400 miles and still have a safety valve. If your out for a long trip you have to approach it a different way than full throttle out and back to the harbor. A different kind of trip. throw in trolling for kings, whale watching and just enjoying the scenery and the time and miles add up. I can go 45MPH+ but why unless you have too?

    When I shrimp I go to and from the pots at trolling speed not 30MPH, catch the same amount shrimp either way. I don't run 12-20 or 30+ miles to check the pots. I mostly work on the boat or fish between pulls. I also stay out close to the pots. Sure I can burn a 100 gallons a day if your paying for the fuel, but if I'm paying for the fuel life slows down.

    I'd love to have bigger more fuel efficient motors, but I have Yami 150's, still under warranty, I'll do the the best I can with what I have and burn less than a hundred gallons of fuel per day.

  6. #6

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    With the fishing machine option you get 150 gallons.

  7. #7
    Member JR2's Avatar
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    I would want 150 minimum, 250 would be perfect.
    2007 Kingfisher 2825 - Stor Fisk

    Civilization ends at the waterline. Beyond that, we all enter the food chain, and not always right at the top. -- Hunter S. Thompson

  8. #8
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    when you get fishing machine option which that boat has you get the larger fuel tank 100 gallons is standard tank

  9. #9

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    I can understand and see how being careful pays off at the pump but for me it just doesn't make sense to have 100 gals in anything under 22'.
    Big seas, ripping tides, loads etc all have a part of more fuel consumption.
    My Hewes (24' Alaskan) has a 160 gal tank and I absolutely love it. Makes the boat ride better in choppy conditions and since I run it as a water taxi, it pays to not be runnin to the fuel dock all the time.
    As for economy? Busiest day last summer, I burned 96 gallons, equates to about 8 gph running at 26-28 Kts all day; half the time heavily loaded with 6 passengers, kyaks & gear, other half of the time mostly unloaded going back.
    When time and schedule allow I throttle back to 4200 and 22kts which brings it down into the 6 gph range.
    All that to say it just does not make sense to me to go skimpy on fuel capacity, plenty other things to think about on the water as opposed to constantly worrying or calculating range, etc. and with 100 gals or less on tap, it's a reality.
    Like someone pointed out should be able to add tanks somewhere which would catapult that boat into a serious machine, not just a 8 hr or less day tripper.
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  10. #10
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    Big Jim,

    How do I get a job like yours lol? I can't imagine a better office...In the Capt's chair of my own boat all day, in Kachemak! You must be the most fortunate person I have ever heard of...just sayin

  11. #11

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    Move to Homer
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  12. #12

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    How much fuel you have is very important, but the real question is how much range do you have?
    The standard features with the 29' in question here, includes a 100 gal tank, but it has the Fishing Machine option, which gives it 150 gallons.
    Our boats continue to evolve with more options, thus more weight, but here are the test results from back when this boat was built. Thanks, Glen

  13. #13
    Member JR2's Avatar
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    My 160 gallon tank is often not big enough and I average 2mpg.When you run over 100 miles one way you have to carry some extra.
    2007 Kingfisher 2825 - Stor Fisk

    Civilization ends at the waterline. Beyond that, we all enter the food chain, and not always right at the top. -- Hunter S. Thompson

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