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Thread: Kachemak bay ling cod

  1. #1
    Member hoose35's Avatar
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    Default Kachemak bay ling cod

    I've been fishing out of Homer for several years and I have never caught a ling cod inside the bay. I have boated a ling cod in my last two trips trolling for kings in the seldovia area. They were both small, in the 20-24" range, but I am positive they were young ling cod. Is this common for others that fish this area? We had some success catching kings as well

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    Member danmiotke's Avatar
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    Seems to be a lot in the area all throughout the water column, I was wondering if it was juvenile fish traveling for food and that they might go find a rock somewhere else to live on.


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    Member hoose35's Avatar
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    Is this a new trend, or have you observed it throughout the years? In my experience, it's new.
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    Member bkbaker's Avatar
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    I saw a couple immature lings caught off Seldovia this winter as well. It made me think about it as well. I wasn't broke off any fish that trip. So I guess there weren't and keepers around.


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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    We caught a small ling off of fourth of July creek in December trolling for kings.
    I'm not sure if this is common or not as I don't fish winter kings all that often.
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  6. #6
    Charterboat Operator
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    Not claiming to be the expert by any means, but we have been catching smaller lings for years, both on the north and south side of the bay, typically more in the winter and early sping, though we have caught a few in mid summer. 2 years ago we caught a 38-40 incher in front of whiskey gulch! I attributed that to the fact that the fish only had one eye, appeared to be healthy other than the scar where its eye once was.
    would indeed be curious to see there migratory patterns.

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    Member avidflyer's Avatar
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    I picked up a small ling ~ 30" a couple weekends ago trolling the bluff area for kings. No kings but we got the ling, a 25# halibut and a half dozen rock fish. It was a bit nasty and bumpy out that day and the wind picked up, but that did not stop the troopers from being at the dock checking everyone out when we came back in. The trooper was a nice guy that wanted to BS more about the boat than the fish (we only kept the halibut).

    Its the first ling I have ever picked up trolling out of homer.

  8. #8
    Charterboat Operator Abel's Avatar
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    Seems in the winter I pick up lings in somenwierd areas trolling kings, like 20fow sand beaches
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    They are pretty common on both the seldovia and anchor point "bluffs" side. Occasionally a legal one will be caught at Pogi or Flat Island. Seems that the bigger ones have been moving north over the last 3 or 4 years. The schools of Capelin haven't been showing up in very strong numbers on the Homer side of the GOA lately, and it seems like some of the fish normally found around the Chugach Islands have pushed out and up into the inlet. We saw huge schools of Black Rockfish feeding on the surface last year near East Chugach Island on rock piles that had been almost barren of rockfish the previous year. My impression was that those rockfish had been offshore and then pushed back into shallow water when the capelin finally arrived. No rockfish on a rock pile generally means no lingcod, so it will be interesting to see what this year brings.

  10. #10
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    Kachemak Bay is a rearing area for lingcod. Lingcod larvae are carried by surface currents into the bay, where they settle in eelgrass beds. As they grow, they move deeper and more into rocky habitats, and by adulthood have moved to more preferred high-energy rocky habitats along the outer coast. Catches of adult (mature) lingcod are very rare in Kachemak Bay. This pattern is seen in lingcod everywhere. Biologists have caught age 0 fish (fish born that year) in several locations in Kachemak Bay, including Eldred Passage, around the Herring Islands, Jakolof Bay, and Seldovia Bay.

  11. #11
    Member Cliffhanger's Avatar
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    I had clients out with me near Pt. Pogibshi 10 days ago on July 1. We hooked a pink and the rod sudden got very heavy and the client had to pump and reel very slowly to get what we thought was kelp to come to the surface. I was standing on my cooler to get a better look. Through the water I could see the pink sideways in the water and the closer it got the more I realised that what was hanging onto it was a LINGCOD. We eased it up to the boat and I netted it. At 40 inches it was legal and a keeper. My clients had no clue how lucky they were.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cliffhanger View Post
    I had clients out with me near Pt. Pogibshi 10 days ago on July 1. We hooked a pink and the rod sudden got very heavy and the client had to pump and reel very slowly to get what we thought was kelp to come to the surface. I was standing on my cooler to get a better look. Through the water I could see the pink sideways in the water and the closer it got the more I realised that what was hanging onto it was a LINGCOD. We eased it up to the boat and I netted it. At 40 inches it was legal and a keeper. My clients had no clue how lucky they were.

    copied this from another thread

    • #44
      alaskapiranha

      Member Join DateDec 2006LocationAnchoragePosts832



      I was fishing in Day Harbor two years ago, and just as a smallish rock fish hit a Trooper Boat pulled up, as I was reeling in a Ling snatched it, rather big one. Well after a bit got him up took photo, didn't turn out, to much shine on the water. Anyway the trooper had positioned him self to watch me I pulled the rockfish out of the water and the ling let go.
      So he asked me how big and if I was going to try and keep the ling I said, nope and put the black rockfish in the bucket. All he said was good!

      Take it for what it's worth! I alway catch mine with a hook in them, hehehe.




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    • 21 Hours Ago #45
      fishsci

      New member Join DateSep 2008Posts7



      I noticed much of this thread was focused on using rockfish as bait. Folks who said rockfish are not legal as bait in saltwater is correct, because they have bag limits. But I would emphasize the definition of legal gear for sport fishing. If a lingcod is hanging onto a rockfish and you gaff or net the lingcod, you are taking a lingcod using the gaff or net (becasue you didn't catch it on a line with hooks attached); gaffs and nets are not legal gear for sport fishing. I think the previous post says it all - the Trooper was poised to act.

      By the way, greenlings are members of Hexagrammidae, the greenling family. Lingcod are the largest member of that family.




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    ...And then they released it after they did not take it out of the water. I am sure that a charter fisherman knows the regulations on keeping a Ling that did not bite the hook.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bullelkklr View Post
    ...And then they released it after they did not take it out of the water. I am sure that a charter fisherman knows the regulations on keeping a Ling that did not bite the hook.
    "
    "We eased it up to the boat and I netted it. At 40 inches it was legal and a keeper."

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