Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Wet or DRy

  1. #1

    Default Wet or DRy

    How do mounts come out better wet or dry process

  2. #2
    Member JuliW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    1,189

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert2968 View Post
    How do mounts come out better wet or dry process
    You are referring to wet tan vs dry tan I assume.

    They don't come out better or different, in my opinion. I have mounted animals tanned both ways. I think wet tan is simply a convenient way for the tannery to make a little extra money, since they charge the same but cut out the tumbling and combing process. LOL I found the wet tan cape to be easier to work with, though I would not make a decision to go to all wet tanned skins based upon that.

    Wet tanned skins also have to be stored in a freezer, whereas dry tan can be stored at room temp or in an unheated area (better cool or frozen for long term storage).

    Wet tanned hides will not make a good wall hanger skin unless tumbled or otherwise finished. If you let a wet tan hide air dry you will not have soft pliable leather...It will be like cardboard.

    Hope this helps. Every taxidermists has their own preference and I am sure you will find some who swear by wet tan only.
    Taxidermy IS art!
    www.alaskawildliferugs.com
    Your mount is more than a trophy, it's a memory. Relive The Memory!

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Eagle River,AK
    Posts
    1,494

    Default

    Hey Juli, how about using Borax in stead of salt on fresh hides. You always here about bringing salt on hunts or people salting furs to dry them up a bit. My dad always used Borax and I have too. Been using it for 30 years on everything. I feel it does a better job of drying then salt and it goes alot further when spread out. I always put a light dusting on my hides when I first put them on boards with the skin side out and it seems to really help dry the hide evenly. Just never hear of folks using it. Sorry for the highjack Robert!

  4. #4
    Member JuliW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    1,189

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by trailblazersteve View Post
    Hey Juli, how about using Borax in stead of salt on fresh hides. You always here about bringing salt on hunts or people salting furs to dry them up a bit. My dad always used Borax and I have too. Been using it for 30 years on everything. I feel it does a better job of drying then salt and it goes alot further when spread out. I always put a light dusting on my hides when I first put them on boards with the skin side out and it seems to really help dry the hide evenly. Just never hear of folks using it. Sorry for the highjack Robert!
    Borax is a preservative and many taxidermists use it for dry preserving bird skins and small mammals before mounting (they dry preseve the skin/hide rather than pickling and tanning it). The problem with using borax and then tanning is that the borax will screw the pickle up....Your tannery might not be happy with you if you are using borax to dry your skins. LOL The small amount you are using may not hurt, but salting (or air drying/stretching) is the preferred method of 'preserving' a hide before tanning.
    Taxidermy IS art!
    www.alaskawildliferugs.com
    Your mount is more than a trophy, it's a memory. Relive The Memory!

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Eagle River,AK
    Posts
    1,494

    Default

    Interesting. I have never heard a word from my tannery or my tax guy but you are probably right, I don't use much so it's probably not noticable. A box last me several years and thats including doing 1 or 2 bears a year. Thanks!

  6. #6
    Member Hughiam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    380

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert2968 View Post
    How do mounts come out better wet or dry process
    A wet tan is pulled from the tanning process before or midway through the final tumbling. I personally like a wet tan better as the longer its in the drying drum the more its beat up by thousands of pounds of skins pummeling it. I tend to get less dermis slip, fewer torn ears, lost tails, ripped out claws, etc. I also believe, although I can't prove it, that I get better stretch out of the skin if its not completely dried. That my be my paranoia, but there are two companies out there that have great wet tans. That being said, I get hit with the extra charges of the boxes being heavier(damp skins weigh more) when shipped from my tannery in the lower 48.
    In Nature's Image Taxidermy and Game Calls
    Palmer

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •