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Thread: Shooting Mtn Goats...What kind of ranges?

  1. #1

    Default Shooting Mtn Goats...What kind of ranges?

    I am headed down to Kodiak this fall for a goat hunt and am curious of something. I have read many different accounts from folks that have had successful goat hunts and it appears that some claim goats aren't easily spooked and that you can get real close to them (much closer than sheep) and then I read of guys shooting them at 300-500 yards. Any insight on what to expect here would be much appreciated. I am still up in the air on which gun to take and long range shots vs closer range shots affects my decision a little

  2. #2

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    I hunted the southern part of the island and the terrain up high can best be described as wavey. This allowed me to crawl in close drop a line for more info

  3. #3
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    I have killed 4. Closest was at 50 yards, longest was about 300. The terrain makes the difference, sometimes there is no way to get closer. Good luck. J.

  4. #4
    Member Dan W's Avatar
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    Default

    Didn't get mine up there but at a little under 13K ft. in Colorado. I had to pass an open area when we were about 600 yds away, after that had a boulder outcrop between us and I shot him at 30 yards. My impression is that they are usually somewhat tolerant of excroachment compared to most other big game, especially sheep. From my experience where I was hunting I'd be pretty careful about taking a long shot at a goat - you'd want to do some pretty good surveying first and make sure you can get to him if you drop him. Also try and put him down hard on a shelf or ledge. I shot mine while he was bedded and killed him instantly. We then started working our way down to him, but not in a rush as everything looked secure. When I got to within about 10 ft. of him, his body relaxes, a leg pops out from under him, and off he goes down the mountainside. Rolling first, then cartwheeling through the air as he gained speed - clear out of sight. Sure wish I'd of grabbed him sooner, would have made getting him out of there a lot less work and the taxidermist wouldn't have had to do any repair work around the eye's. Actually I was amazed at how little damage that trip down the mountain made on the goat. Their tough animals.... I'm rambling - have fun. I wouldn't worry too much about very long range shots, I'm hoping to take my next goat with my bow.

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    Default Let you know

    I'll let you know at the end of September.
    Everything that lives and moves will be food for you.
    Genesis 9:3

  6. #6
    Member FALCON's Avatar
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    Default Goats

    AC:

    I have killed 2 billies in Washington. One at 30 yards, the other at 150.
    I have never hunted sheep, so its hard to compare. I do think they are pretty easy to get close to as long as they are in a shootable area. A word of caution. They love to jump off cliffs when mortily wounded, so make the first shot count, and get ready for follow up shot quickly.

    Good luck, and stay safe!

  7. #7
    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    Default shot distance for goats

    responded on "other forum"...pretty much as above.

  8. #8
    Member AK-HUNT's Avatar
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    Default Nice Ibex!!!!

    Just love your pic.....

  9. #9
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    Default Comparison my sheep/goats

    7 goats in S.E. only one over 150 yards two with a .44 pistol. As above they like to go over cliff's. Least easily spooked animal of all I have hunted but one of the hardest to kill and recover from a poor shot. With a goat once you've spotted it if you really want it your gonna get it.

    2 Sheep and I have hunted as hard for them as I have for the goats just much less successfully. (one was 43.5/42.25 inches in 2002) both had to be shot over 150 yards but died fairly easily. Spooked more than a few rams with camera or hunting trying to get closer. Good luck.

  10. #10
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    Default Goats on Kodiak

    I went on four goat hunts last fall on Kodiak and all four had shots of 150 yds or less. I was able to get to 38 yds on mine. We never had to shoot at a moving animal either.
    I can't think of a place that would have required a shot more than 300 yds, and if it did I would have passed. If you don't spook them, they seem to stay pretty close to the same area. We got on some goats late one day and decided to come back the next. They were within a hundred yards of where they were the day before.
    Watch for clouds and fog. We waited for the fog to roll in on one stalk and was able to get a hundred yards closer.
    It's a lot easier to make a 50 yd shot than a 300 yd shot. Just be patient and you should do fine.

    Good luck and stay safe.


    Gary

  11. #11
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    Default distance

    I consider goats to possibly be the toughest animal in N. America to kill. Because of that I wouldn't want to take an extremely long shot on one but would prefer to be well under 200 yards with a rifle at least as potent as a 30'06. I once shot one with a 300 winchester at about 100 yards with a good chest shot. He dropped and then immediately stood up and I shot him again with a good hit in the same place. Again he dropped and I turned to pick up my pack as my son told me he just stood up again, took two steps and dropped off a cliff, which fortunately was only about 10 feet high and landed dead. On another hunt a friend of mine shot a nanny at about 75 yards and thought that he had missed as the group all ran off. I immediately shot a billy at about 150 yards and my friend went back to get the packs while I went for my billy. As I walked down hill for him I glanced uphill and there was his nanny climbing a cliff with her guts hanging out, as he had made a poor shot and hit way too far back. I doubt any other animal would be climbing a cliff under those conditions. They are the only animal which I have hunted where if the conditions are not just right I won't shoot, because if there is a chance of something going wrong it will every time. That being said, if you pick your situation, use an adequate rifle and make a good shot things should be fine. I don't consider the extreme shots mentioned in the first thread to be ideal...

  12. #12
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Default

    I'll try to get within 40 yards on august 20
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  13. #13

    Default Depends on terrain

    I've shot one at 400 yards, 100 yards, 20 yards, and 15 feet. Just depends on the terrain. Usually you can get much closer to them than sheep, but again it all depends on if you have the cover to get closer.

  14. #14

    Default shot placement

    My first was at 487 yards, second was 245 yards; both through the boiler rooms. The range to the goats can be very deceiving in rough terrain, so it is a good idea to bring a range finder if you do not mind carrying the extra weight.

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