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Thread: Female Bow Hunter Needs Advice

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    Default Female Bow Hunter Needs Advice

    Hello Everyone,

    I'm looking for advice or guides to set up my bow for moose hunting. I am a female with a 60 pound draw. Here are my questions;

    1. What is a good draw weight for moose hunting?
    2. How should I sight in my pins? ie; starting at 20 yards and increase by 5 yards, or increase by 10 yards
    3. Any other suggestions for a female. What does the female in your life prefer?

    Thanks!!

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    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    60 pounds will do for a moose. I like cut-on-impact broad-heads such as Magnus Stainless Steel Snuffers. I would set the fist pin at 20 and then ten apart out to 50. That depends on your one "personal" accuracy range though. If you only feel comfortable at 40, then you might do 10,20,30,40. BUT, under ideal conditions, that 50 might be doable considering the kill zone of a moose being so large.

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    If you are shooting at 60lbs that is fine. That is what I have been shooting this last year and took my moose just fine at 40 yards.

    As for sigh pins, I set my first at 25 yards second at 40 then 50, 60 and 70. Seemed to work well for me. Not sure if I would take a shot at more than 50 unless everything was perfect then maybe.

    As for the female in my life she prefers to do her hunting at Nordstrums.

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    I would say to set your draw weight at what is most comfortable for you to pull not going any less than 50 pounds. You also should only set your sights according to your personal comfort. If your only comfortable shoot out to 40 yards you can set them up every 5 yards although even at 50 pounds the difference in 5 and 10 yards on your pins is going to be minimal . And shoot till it hurts. The more you shoot the better your groups will get and the more confident you will get. Might be able to pull the 60 pounds no problem after a while and move your distance back a ways. Good luck. There is a major feeling of accomplishment to take an animal with a bow.

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    My only advise is at some point practice with the "Bulk" of clothing you expect to wear on a 22* above frosty morning. Good hunting to you, Lady.

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    Quote Originally Posted by monpet View Post
    Hello Everyone,

    I'm looking for advice or guides to set up my bow for moose hunting. I am a female with a 60 pound draw. Here are my questions;

    1. What is a good draw weight for moose hunting?
    2. How should I sight in my pins? ie; starting at 20 yards and increase by 5 yards, or increase by 10 yards
    3. Any other suggestions for a female. What does the female in your life prefer?

    Thanks!!

    60 lbs will be just fine. Sight in for 20, then go up in 10 yard increments. A good, sharp two blade broad head on the end of a 450 grain arrow will suffice. Good luck.

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    I agree with Daveinthebush on the cut on impact broad heads. I use snuffers and they do need sharping and setting up to be true on the arrow. I would look at the anatomy of the moose and learn what bones you may have to cut thru to get to the vitals. look at all angles and pay attention to the size of the scapula and what range it has when the moose is walking or standing. That is one area you do not want to hit with an arrow. I would only shoot a moose at 50 yards if no wind and no brush any where in site. Lots of things can happen in 50 yards! The next item is your arrow weight? I shoot heavy arrows so I limit my shots to 40 yards. I use a longbow and shoot full length 31.5" 900+ grain arrows with 165 grain Snuffers and have had clean kills every time. Arrow weight plus the sectional density and good cutting broad head for good penetration I have found to be key! Last thing is being able to pull that 60 lbs after a long day of hiking and effort. Practice this shooting when fatigued so you will be able to know your limits. Remember the FIRST shot is the one that counts when your practicing and hunting!

    Good luck and have fun, hope you have a great hunt!

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    Thank you everyone!! Fantastic advice. Since you guys have so many helpful ideas, any suggestions for the bow certification course? I'm a little nervous to do it.

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    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    You can do it online or attend a class. If you do not have much experience, I would suggest the class. You could even read the online portion and prep yourself for the class. The field portion is relatively easy. Most failures are from people that have not practiced, not shot in 30 years or ill equipped. Just practice from 15 -30 yards, standing and sitting and you should be fine. Remember that the shot are not judged by the rings on the animal targets but by the "through" shot as it passes through the animal.

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    I think everyone has the advice area pretty much covered, the only thing I might add in addition to practicing while wearing the clothes you will have on in the field would be to remember to practice drawing and releasing from the sitting, kneeling, and other positions you are likely to find useful in the field (i.e. in the woods, uneven ground, etc). When the moment of truth comes and you are close enough to hear a 1500lb animal breathing, you will be more confident in your shot knowing that you have practiced as much as possible for a wide range of scenarios. Happy hunting!

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    Shoot daily if you can. A range in the back yard will allow more practice time. When it comes time to take a moose, know the range and don't take a shot further than you can put a group in a pie plate. You want a broad side shot right in the sweet spot, through the lungs. Be prepared to blood trail. When I took the archery class, the 'instructor' told us a lung hit moose will go down 'within sight.' I have blasted an arrow all the way through the lungs and had them run full out for 200 yards. Others have staggered a few steps and fallen. I shoot Satellite 4 blade broad heads with razor inserts. Sturdy, super sharp, and deadly.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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    Everyone has assumed you are shooting a compound bow...I will continue on that thread. I shoot a compound that I have set at 63#. I have shot two moose with it and have had complete pass through of my arrows (chest/lung shots). Both were about 20 yards away. I chose to go with carbon arrows and I use a Muzzy 3 Blade broadhead with a trochar tip (which will shatter bone if it connects). I personally won't change for the cut on impact although my closest archery friend would only use the cut on impact. Try both on targets and see what flies best with your set up, and go with that :-) If you want to do well on your archery class (shooting phase), make a plan where you find the time every day until your course where you will shoot 6 to 12 arrows a day. Do it at different distances, but most in the 20 yard range. If you do this, rain or shine, you will only get better and better as well as more comfortable. The shooting courses are very straight forward, so go in relaxed. If you can, go to some 3D shoots...not sure where you are located, but the Cook Inlet Archery Club has a shoot off the Old Glenn in Chugach on March 15th...well worth the time for practice and you can join just about any group as everyone is friendly...lots of families too. Hope that helps.
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    As a female bowhunter, I don't think there is much difference between men and women regarding equipment or technique ...the amount of weight they can draw on a bow of course will be different....

    I have mine set at 53# - with a good sharp blade and proper shot placement, that is plenty enough force to take down any big game animal in AK. I do believe the law requires 50lb min draw weight.

    I actually increase poundage in the summer to 58# - then decrease for hunting season. Reason being I don't want to think about drawing the bow while I am hunting... I want my mechanics to be smooth and easy... If you are excited, cold, in an awkward position, or think you will have to hold at full draw for a while, it is important for drawing the bow to be easy and virtually automatic. At least that is my philosophy.

    Practice, practice, practice.... good luck on your hunt!
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    Quote Originally Posted by JuliW View Post
    As a female bowhunter, I don't think there is much difference between men and women regarding equipment or technique ...the amount of weight they can draw on a bow of course will be different....

    I have mine set at 53# - with a good sharp blade and proper shot placement, that is plenty enough force to take down any big game animal in AK. I do believe the law requires 50lb min draw weight.

    I actually increase poundage in the summer to 58# - then decrease for hunting season. Reason being I don't want to think about drawing the bow while I am hunting... I want my mechanics to be smooth and easy... If you are excited, cold, in an awkward position, or think you will have to hold at full draw for a while, it is important for drawing the bow to be easy and virtually automatic. At least that is my philosophy.

    Practice, practice, practice.... good luck on your hunt!
    I have my bow set at 80#. It is a struggle to draw more than a few times when I first start practicing each summer. I don't notice it being hard to draw at all when a bull moose is in range. Must be the adrenaline.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SmokeRoss View Post
    I have my bow set at 80#. It is a struggle to draw more than a few times when I first start practicing each summer. I don't notice it being hard to draw at all when a bull moose is in range. Must be the adrenaline.
    80# is great for water buffalo, elephant and cape buffalo. Great that you can pull it but I would lighten up. In time your muscles, tendons and such are going to show wear and you will develop problems. It is like going deaf. You don't notice it then one day you answer the wife and end up going to the in-laws for a month because you agreed to it. I am almost 64 now and shoot 63-64 pounds. Good for about anything that walks except the aforementioned.

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    If I may hijack for just a moment as at thought just occurred to me while reading this....

    Have any of you ever had a moose jump the shot at close range like elk and deer have a habit of doing...???

    Just curious.....
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    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    I don't think a moose can react in the same way as a deer or that fast. On the one moose I arrowed, she never knew what hit her until it was too late, way too late. She never reacted until the arrow hit.

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    monpet,

    I would encourage you to go do the Bow Certification course. You will learn lots and have fun shooting at the the targets at different angles, distances and types. It is fun. Everyone is nervous when taking the course. Just shoot your best and some shots they have you take I told the instructor I wouldn't take that shot in a hunting situation. I still took the shots because I had to and my shots were all in the vitals so I passed just fine. I just have my limits for hunting. It can't hurt to try and you will do fine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SmokeRoss View Post
    I have my bow set at 80#. It is a struggle to draw more than a few times when I first start practicing each summer. I don't notice it being hard to draw at all when a bull moose is in range. Must be the adrenaline.
    I suppose for me, since most of my bowhunting is done from a tree - sitting still for long periods, in sometimes cold weather - makes drawing a bow a little more difficult. Especially if I am trying to shoot left handed in a 'right handed' tree. I found it easier for me to build up the muscles, then decrease the poundage for hunting. I took my bow caribou hunting in the fall, and did not decrease the poundage, because I felt the warmer temps and movement would keep me limbered up.
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    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JuliW View Post
    Especially if I am trying to shoot left handed in a 'right handed' tree. .
    Been there and done that. My son sets up the stands, right handed. And then I go back East and have a limb in my way or no shooting lane. But I should not complain, 7 deer in the past two years is plenty. I appreciate his efforts.

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