Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: new rifle stock options

  1. #1
    Member tlingitwarrior's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,258

    Default new rifle stock options

    Looking to replace a couple old wooden stocks, one from a Ruger M77 Mark II and an old Mod 70. I've heard of McMillian, Hogue, and Bell and Carson. Others to consider or ones to avoid?
    In 1492 Native Americans discovered Columbus lost at sea
    _________________________________________________

    If I come across as an arrogant, know-it-all jerk, it's because I am

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    352

    Default

    McMillan is the Cadillac but will need to be bedded. Their pre-fits are inletted on the big side. Bell and Carlson makes a stock with a drop in stock with an aluminum bedding block I have heard good things about. I have a Hogue on a 10/22. The forearm is kinda floppy.

  3. #3

    Default

    I run a few of the BCs. Great stocks for the money. Bedding is not a must. No matter what you get check out stocky's website. Usually the best prices on stocks.

    https://www.stockysstocks.com

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Chugiak, AK
    Posts
    123

    Default

    If you want to keep with wood Byods has reasonable prices and seem to fit pretty well.

  5. #5
    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Dillingham, AK
    Posts
    2,482

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tlingitwarrior View Post
    Looking to replace a couple old wooden stocks, one from a Ruger M77 Mark II and an old Mod 70. I've heard of McMillian, Hogue, and Bell and Carson. Others to consider or ones to avoid?
    It depends on how much money you want to spend and what kind of quality/performance you expect. Ergonomics are another thing to consider. I'm unaware of anyone that offers as many styles and customizations as McMillan does for a "drop-in" fit. You can order almost any color and finish imaginable from McMillan and they'll accommodate any LOP and upon request in some inlets they'll will push the action forward which can make for a nice improvement. You determine the barrel contour, bottom metal, sling studs (number and type), graphite cloth, standard fill or magnum fill on each and every stock and I like to make my own decisions. They're a reputable, established company and that makes a difference to me. It'd be tough to get a better (more durable, stable, or serviceable) stock than McMillan at any price and when you consider that for the same money or an extra 1-200$ you can have the very best it makes financial sense to use McMillan if you want a synthetic stock. I've McMillans that are bedded and la few that are as they came from McMillan. I've never had one that wasn't an improvement, but will readily agree that properly bedding any riflestock simply makes sense.

    There are other stock makers that are also serviceable. Manners is a maker that receives pretty good reviews. Most of their stocks incorporate some type of vertical grip and a substantial forearm, but they have recently started to make a more traditional styled sporter stock. They're about the same money as a McMillan and about the best thing I've heard about them is that they are an imitation McMillan, which isn't the worse thing in the world. I don't own one and haven't used one so my understandings are suspect. At their pricepoint I'll skip Manners, but obviously they are an up and coming maker.

    I've owned several HS Precision stocks and they're heavy for their size and have a robust feel to them. For me that makes them clunky and I'd rather skip them for a B&C which seems every bit as viable as the HS, for significantly less money and less weight. On a tight budget I can see using B&C, but on some models they take a lot of work to get the stock to mate to a barreled action. Hogue stocks have never fitted my frame particularly well and I can't warm up to the rubber coating. If you like the coating and they fit you they're like any other injection molded (plastic) stock in their performance.

    Bansners High-Tech stocks are nice options and are quite light. They come in one style and take quite a bit of work to finish them. There have been recent changes at Bansners and their availability is going to be very limited for awhile. If you like the style that's offered and you can mount a recoil pad, bed and paint the stock yourself then you can have a very nice stock for about the price of a B&C, but if you pay to have it done, you're in McMillan money with one style from which to choose. I like options so I've not used Bansners, but I've been around them enough to like them.

    Brown Precision is a very good stock and before McMillan used graphite cloth in their stocks they were the best lightweight option available. They are lightweight and well made, but again they are limited in variety. They are also as expensive as McMillan, maybe more, and their lead time is similar.

    Boyd's laminate stocks are solid stocks for very little money. A wood rasp, sandpaper and some bedding compound can turn one into a well fitted stock to both the rifle and shooter. They are heavy and while I've never broken a McMillan, I have broken a Boyd's laminate and seen others do the same. If the weight isn't an issue and you don't mind carving and sanding yourself they are a pretty good option.

    There are other stockmakers as well, but these are the ones which I have some experience. I trade and buy into various rifles and end up with various stocks, but if I'm buying a replacement stock I'll buy a McMillan or Boyd's depending on what I'm trying to accomplish. YMMV.
    Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •