Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Smoker question

  1. #1

    Default Smoker question

    I was at Fred Myers two hours ago contemplating spending $299.99 on a Bradley Smoker, and stopped because I knew that before risking a 300 dollar mistake, I should consult with the vast knowledge available here at the AK Fishing Forum.

    1. Is this a really good smoker?
    2. I wanted a smoker that I can smoke a whole red fillet on a rack. Is there another smoker I can do that, that is wide enough to smoke whole red fillets?
    3. Another choice someone might recommend?

    Thank you.
    Hike faster. I hear banjo music.

  2. #2

    Thumbs up smoker

    well what kind of smoked fish are you trying too get? hot smoked, or cold smoked? that smoker seems too run kinda hot so if you want too cook the fish aka hot smoked it works great if you want jerky fish or dry fish aka squa candy try alot less heat i like a smoker to get 75 to 85 dagrees colder smoke moreless i like jerkyfied fish or a light smoke then canned for kipper. i don't no if that helped you much but thought i would through that out there. feel free to ask any ?'s i smoke lots of fish and can it also.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,293

    Default

    Hmmm. My Bradley has adjustable heat. I can turn the heat all the way off if I choose, or dial it up to wherever I want it. I don't understand the previous comment at all.

    As for physical size? It's as big or bigger than any commercially available home smoker I've seen. The new digital Bradley has more racks and a thermostatic heat controller, but I believe the rack size is the same as the original Bradley. Before you pay for the standard model take a look at the digital model.

    If you want to smoke a whole fillet you may have to trim the fillet to fit the rack. That seems like a good compromise. You can cut off the thin tail end that'll dry out anyway, and you still get a pretty big piece on one rack.

    I like my Bradley a lot. My standard model has served me well for several years. I like the thermostat feature on the digital model but once I got used to my smoker's heat adjustment I've had an easy time controlling the temps. The trick is to preheat and get the temps stabilized before you add your fish. You can make good smoked fish in any home smoker but the Bradley makes it easier since you can go to work and the smoke generator feeds itself.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Sarasota, Florida
    Posts
    802

    Default Why pay big bucks?

    plywood, screws, rabbit wire, 1" X 2"s, electric hot plate, extension cord, old pot

    use your imagination and save $200...

    http://www.alaskanauthor.com

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,293

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskanAuthor View Post
    plywood, screws, rabbit wire, 1" X 2"s, electric hot plate, extension cord, old pot

    use your imagination and save $200...

    http://www.alaskanauthor.com
    The extra $200 gets you a smoker that doesn't require labor to assemble, is easy to clean, has machine-washable stainless steel racks, drip tray, and drip pan, has temperature control, a washable stainless interior, an adjustable smoke vent, is insulated for efficiency, a self-feeding smoke generator, is lightweight and easy to store, and is UL rated so you can use it on your deck while you're gone to work. The temperature control along with the self-feeding smoke generator are the best part. A Bradley doesn't require babysitting and adding smoke chips.

    But you will have to get along without the urea formaldehyde outgassing that you'd get from the plywood!

  6. #6

    Default

    Bought a used pastry box stainless 35 bucks, got some used doughnut racks 24x36 3 bucks each stainless, 1 used sheet tray free.

    Put a roasting pan in the bottom with Kingston charcoal going around the pan to the center like a cork screw starting with a line of 1 briquet then 2,2,2,3,3,3,4,4,4,5,5,5,4,4,4,2,2,4,4,4 until I get to the center
    add the chips to feed the smoke, start the first charcoal and open the finished smoker in the morning or after work. Works like a charm.

    I did have to watch the first few loads to get the temp that I wanted and understand how to load the heat source.

    Now it is a no brain er and I don't need to plug it in. Way less than 300 bucks.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Kenai
    Posts
    1,888

    Default

    I really enjoy ours, & ribs I make in it are even better than the fish!!!
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

  8. #8
    Member trapperrick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Seward, AK
    Posts
    201

    Default urea formaldehyde

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    But you will have to get along without the urea formaldehyde outgassing that you'd get from the plywood!
    Gee, where's the fun in that? Don't you like eating salmon and rubbing tears from your eyes? Yeah, it's the Alaskan thing to do to DIY but in this case I think I'd spend the money on something nice that's going to last for years and give a good quality product.

  9. #9
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    5,767

    Default Home made smoker racks

    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskanAuthor View Post
    plywood, screws, rabbit wire, 1" X 2"s, electric hot plate, extension cord, old pot

    use your imagination and save $200...

    http://www.alaskanauthor.com
    Bernard,

    Chicken wire (your "rabbit wire", I think) is galvanized, and very bad for your health. Most folks I know that go home-made use wire refrigerator racks and build the box to fit them. They're stainless and work very well.

    I had not heard of the "urea outgassing issue" that was mentioned. Learn something new every day...

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  10. #10
    New member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Soldotna
    Posts
    5,639

    Default

    I've had one of these for over 15 years and can't say enough good about it.

    Go here: http://www.sausagemaker.com/index.as...ATS&Category=4

    The Bradley makes me uneasy, not knowing what kind of glue/adhesive holds the biscuits together.

    Last edited by Marcus; 07-31-2007 at 08:54.

  11. #11
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    493

    Default

    What about using an old refrigerator or freezer with a hot plate for smoking your salmon in.Ive heard of people doing this.Is this method safe.

  12. #12
    Member Rick P's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer Alaska
    Posts
    2,339

    Default

    The frig method works well for cold smoked fish but still has issues with contaminants. Personally I like a brick smoke house with both a in house firebox and a indirect firebox that way you can do every thing from hams to cold smoked fish to a pig roast.

  13. #13

    Default

    Smokintex is one brand to consider. Sportsman's has some. They are pricey though. The price tag is the only thing keeping me from buying it. The more I look at the Bradley's the less I want one. If they would double the capacity and offer it at the same price then I would reconsider.

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    140

    Default

    I have the smoker Marcus recommends above. Good little unit.

  15. #15
    Member moose-head's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    @ Seminary, Dubuque Ia
    Posts
    839

    Default Bradley wood?

    I believe that with the Bradley you end up having to use the hockey puck wood that they sell for your smoke. Does this become expensive or inconvenient to buy? I am a bit of a cheapskate and usually use some alder from an honest to goodness tree so the hockey pucks seem like a bit of a drawback to me. The convenience of loading a stack of them in and not thinking about it does seem like a big plus though. How highly do the owners rate the convenience of the wood? also is there any "maintenance" things that these require between batches or otherwise?

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •