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Thread: Tent or tarp?

  1. #1
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    Default Tent or tarp?

    What do you folks have in your survival kit?

    For years I've only had 2 GI ponchos for weather protection but I'm thinking of changing over to a light Kelty 3 person tent in my C 170. My only problem with making this change is the poncho's can easily be used as shelter and also to move around and stay dry so if I make the change which is about the same weight, I loose the "walkabout" value for a better shelter. What to do...any thoughts??
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    I guess it depends what you want to equip for. An injury accident and a forced AOG to wait out weather are very different. I've done the latter while equipped for the former. That sucked. I added a tent and a real sleeping bag after that. I still carry my accident survival gear as well since it's feather light.

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    For survival I carry a bivy sack. It will keep you dry and warm for days. Two can fit in it if needed. It has zipper so it is bug proof. Adds about 10 degree warmth to sleeping bag. I do need to carry separate rain gear. For bare bones light extra large orange garbage bags would work but not real bug or rain proof. If you crash good chance you won't be walking out due to injury. Just hunker down and wait. Back in a different life I was a 1st Recon Corpsman. We carried just poncho and liner, one on the ground one over the top with your buddy back to back. Did fine down to 35-40 with the right hat and dry socks. Once you get wet it sucks. The other issue you have to address is time of year. My winter kit is a lot heavier than the summer one.
    DENNY

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    Friend of mine got fogged out of home on a winter day when he was just buzzing around a few years back. Landed on a lake and ended up having to spend the night. He drastically changed his kit...said that it all seemed adequate when it was all theoretical, but he wanted to be warm next time...

    I carry a full-on Mt. Everest style 4 season 4 person tent, -20F sleeping bags, and sleeping pads. Takes up a lot of room, but I like having the gear to facilitate the right decision should it be warranted.
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    Not in an airplane, but broke down in a vehicle in winter on the Alcan. Very cold. I told my buddy to bring a sleeping bag. He brought Refrigawear instead. I was warm in my sleeping bag sitting in the drivers seat of a non running vehicle. He froze his ass off in the Refrigawear.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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    I just added one of these to my boat kit . http://www.thelifestraw.com/ Cabela's has them.
    When seconds count, the cops are just minutes away.
    '08 24' HCM Granite HD "River Dog"

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    What got me thinking about this was a deer hunt last year when I shot a nice deer 3+ miles from my 4 wheeler and it got dark and I wasn't about to give the deer to wolves or whatever so I stayed there with just what was in my day pack. It wasn't awful but I was cold about 0300 on and made a promise that I wasn't going to be cold anymore. I fixed that problem with extra set of wool under the rain suit.

    Bottom line, 50F and wet is dangerous which made me think the tent is a better set up than ponchos. I do have extra clothes, sleeping bags and the usual stuff and I'm thinking the Kelty 3.2 is a 3 season but pretty tight tent and with closed cell foam pads, bags and extra clothes and some heat packs things should be OK for a few days anyway. Spot is an important part of the kit so hopefully a week is doable.

    Other thoughts welcome.
    Somewhere along the way I have lost the ability to act politically correct. If you should find it, please feel free to keep it.

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    Currently I have a Bivy in the plane because I'm still a student pilot, extra weight is extremely limited in a J-3 with the instructor on board and I'm sticking pretty close to populated areas and roads. But once I start venturing further I plan to take a regular tent. My thought is that I am far less likely to push marginal weather to get home if I know I have a good tent, bag, and food in the plane and can very comfortably spend a few nights if needed.

    Getting weathered in a few days seems a much more likely scenario so prepare for that and you have a very plush survival setup.

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    I have a good heavy space blanket and good tent in my plane. As others have said, the chances of using it are far greater waiting out weather than an actual crash so you may as well be semi comfy. If you have the gear, you may not push weather (as others have also said).

  10. #10
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    Yes indeed. I always fly with gear and proper clothing. But I once had a client who insisted on wearing shorts, flip=flops and a short sleeve tee-shirt on check-ride day. ( My DPE is 70 miles away) .

    When we returned to Kachemak Bay that late afternoon we found the whole bay covered in fog. While I was set up for an all night camp-out in the mountains, my client was not. If the bugs did not eat him alive, hypothermia would have got him.
    So I really pushed my (our) luck with a very scary lake landing in the fog.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lowrider View Post
    What got me thinking about this was a deer hunt last year when I shot a nice deer 3+ miles from my 4 wheeler and it got dark and I wasn't about to give the deer to wolves or whatever so I stayed there with just what was in my day pack. It wasn't awful but I was cold about 0300 on and made a promise that I wasn't going to be cold anymore. I fixed that problem with extra set of wool under the rain suit.

    Bottom line, 50F and wet is dangerous which made me think the tent is a better set up than ponchos. I do have extra clothes, sleeping bags and the usual stuff and I'm thinking the Kelty 3.2 is a 3 season but pretty tight tent and with closed cell foam pads, bags and extra clothes and some heat packs things should be OK for a few days anyway. Spot is an important part of the kit so hopefully a week is doable.

    Other thoughts welcome.
    Many times sheep hunters go and go and by the time they find, or kill rams it's near dark thirty. If you don't have your camp on your back what do you do? For cases like this, or in your case, something that is super light and will actually keep you warm in the fall when it hasn't yet got too crazy cold is a space blanket and a long burning emergency candle. A guy can wrap himself in the space blanket and prop up against a rock or tree, and hold the candle inside the blanket against his core. Nobody said you're gonna sleep, and it may be a long night, but it works and can keep you fairly warm and dry. Better that, than leave your deer or the rams and have to head all the way back to camp. Again, this idea is all about being super light weight.....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Good tip 4merguide...!

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    If you sometimes camp near or by your plane, try epoxying big snaps to the UNDERSIDE of the trailing wing. These should match the snaps and the spacing on a G.I rain poncho. You can snap the poncho to the male snaps on the wing, and you have a dry, out-of-the-wind camp that can be set up in less than one minutes. It works well, and doesn't affect airflow when flying . . .

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    Easier to tie the peak of a pyramid tent to the top of the strut/tiedown under the wing...stake the bottom out and you are dry... The sil-nylon one I have weighs less than a pound. When I end up out away from camp hunting, I use a lightweight bag in a bivy with a 3/4 pad. Keeps you from getting hypothermic if you have to spend the night out up in the Brooks. 2-3lbs...

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    Quote Originally Posted by pipercub View Post
    Easier to tie the peak of a pyramid tent to the top of the strut/tiedown under the wing...stake the bottom out and you are dry... The sil-nylon one I have weighs less than a pound. When I end up out away from camp hunting, I use a lightweight bag in a bivy with a 3/4 pad. Keeps you from getting hypothermic if you have to spend the night out up in the Brooks. 2-3lbs...
    Excellent idea, I just didn't want to buy another danged tent !!!

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    Good ideas all!

    I have a golite 5 tipi and it probably should be in the plane but I usually keep it in my 4wheeler or snogo along with heavier stay warm stuff. It is very light for the protection it provides but I'm in the routine of having bags of "stuff" in each vehicle so I don't need to move things from one to the other. I also have a survival vest that has basic things and a Taurus .22 mag revolver in it too and in the summer, that stuff tends to get moved to my PFD when on the water. Once I get my Patrol build the next project is a set of floats for it so I'll have to change up the contents then too.

    Former,

    I do have candles and space blankets but I really don't have that much faith in the aluminum blankets...usually too short and hard to keep in place especially in the wind. I bought a aluminum bivy once but I must have left it somewhere or someone needed it more than me. Always thought that would keep one person pretty warm with a head hole in the bottom and a fire or candle or a heat pack...they are light and they do help at least for part of your body.
    Somewhere along the way I have lost the ability to act politically correct. If you should find it, please feel free to keep it.

  17. #17
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    I started carrying my sheep tent and sleeping bag but I also have a couple space blankets in my survival vest pockets as a backup if for some reason I can't get to them.
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