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Thread: Who all owns british bred (hunting) labs?

  1. #1
    Member JuliW's Avatar
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    Default Who all owns british bred (hunting) labs?

    After some searching and researching, I have finally located a british labrador breeder to get my next huntin buddy from. Excited about the breeding which is due to take place this spring, but don't know if it is public knowledge yet, so will keep the lid on that box for the time being.

    However, I am curious to know if anyone else in the forum community owns a british (hunting) lab... NOT the blocky show type labs - but the working retrievers.

    There are a few breeders who I felt inclined to pass by - based mostly upon the sheer number of pups they produce - but overall I think there are some good breeders who are looking to put some really good hunting dogs out there.

    Mostly I'd be curious to know how folks like training, living with, and hunting with their british dogs...
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    Member ak_cowboy's Avatar
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    A buddy at work has one. Great for ducks, geese, and salt water. Decent for upland, but the stubby legs are a drawback

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    Got one comeing at the end of march . I`ve had labs for 30 yr`s now prefrere the english style . Like the block head /otter tail look .
    black or chocolate doesn`t matter

  4. #4

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    Picked up a small female four years ago from a breeder in Minnesota. She has turned into a very good duck dog. The biggest negative is her size, especially when she gets in really deep, thick cover. Her heart and nose make up for it in my opinion. They are very easy to train and need only minimal verbal discipline. I do know of several washouts from the same kennel, so I would for sure do your homework. I've owned American labs and the British are definitely different breed. They are thinkers ; you could send an American lab on a line over a cliff ( and to it's demise), give the British dog the same command, and it will find its way around and down and back with your bird. It all depends what you want.

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    Member JuliW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by akcarv View Post
    Picked up a small female four years ago from a breeder in Minnesota. She has turned into a very good duck dog. The biggest negative is her size, especially when she gets in really deep, thick cover. Her heart and nose make up for it in my opinion. They are very easy to train and need only minimal verbal discipline. I do know of several washouts from the same kennel, so I would for sure do your homework. I've owned American labs and the British are definitely different breed. They are thinkers ; you could send an American lab on a line over a cliff ( and to it's demise), give the British dog the same command, and it will find its way around and down and back with your bird. It all depends what you want.
    Sounds like my type of dog. I have had chessies for several years.. they think all the time! LOL...
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    PM Sent....
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