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Thread: Buying a gun for Grizzly & Sheep hunt

  1. #1

    Default Buying a gun for Grizzly & Sheep hunt

    I was planing a diy hunt with my buddy but he bailed out and wants to go elk hunting in Colorado so I have decided to book a grizz/sheep hunt with Jake....I have no experience with purchasing a gun...I'm trying to decide between a .340 Wby, .300 Wby or a .338 Kimber Montana & I have a question....It is quite obvious that almost everyone on this board prefers the .338, but it looks to me like a .300 Wby is more powerful (deadly) gun than the .338 when you look at the ballistics...IF this is the case why wouldn't I get the .300 Wby (less recoil than the other two)...I don't know anything about gun ballistics so I very well might be reading them wrong but I compared the .338 200 gr barnes xfb to .300 Wby 200 gr partition...Thanks in advance for the help

  2. #2

    Default Lots of Differences

    I will cover just a couple major differences, but there are many. First, the 300 Wby requires a longer action, thus required more wieght, etc. This is a factor in a sheep rifle. For a interior grizzly rifle, the killing power of a 300 Wby or a .338 are not really a factor, they will both kill a bear adequately. If you're not familiar with ballistics, I am assuming you don't reload. If that's the case, you are going to pay probably twice as much for ammo for the 300 Wby. Also, if you look at the ballistics, I would bet the numbers are coming from a 26" barrel in the 300 Wby, and a 24" barrel in the .338. Again, more weight, etc. You might also want to do a search on frontal diameter of a bullet and it's effects on game/killing power. This may be a waste of your time though, considering neither round is marginal for grizzly or sheep. There are other rounds to consider, the .325 WSM, .300 WSM, or the good old reliable .300 Winchester. Everybody will have an opinion, but weigh the facts and make your decision.

  3. #3
    Member SoggyMountain's Avatar
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    Looks like a good post to me Blackfoot. Especially the cost of ammo.

  4. #4
    Member lab man's Avatar
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    Many people shoot the .338 poorly because it kicks so hard they don't want to practice with it. I'm not an incredible fan of the .338. I don't see what makes it a geat gun. I think a .375 is a better choice, and not really more expensive to shoot. It shoots pretty flat, and hits hard.

    For a sheep gun and bear gun, I would look at the .300 wsm. I haven't used the gun personally, but have heard many good reports about it. The .300 should do everything you need it to do and more. Blackfoot is right that the .300 win mag will work fine, but if I were looking at the win mag I might just go for the .30-06. You will hear many different opinions hear, and chances are most of them will be ok. It will come down to which gun YOU prefer, and which one you can shoot the best.

    -Eric

  5. #5
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    Many people shoot numerous cartridges poorly because of recoil, bad stock design, bad recoil pads, or simply because of a lack of practice. The .375 H&H produces more recoil than the .338WM, so it kicks more. However, the average .375 H&H rifle is heavier than the average .338WM, so it feels like it kicks less.

    The .375 is a great old cartridge, that has been used in Alaska for quite a lot of years, although in Alaska the .338WM outnumbers the .375 H&H by a wide margin, and is seen as an all around caliber. The same can be said of the .300WM, and even the .30-06. Both the .300WM and .338WM are all around cartridges up here. The main advantage of the .338 over the .300 is when bullet weights from 225 to 300 grains are used, plus a tiny larger frontal area. Below those weights, both perform about the same, giving an edge to the .30 over the .33 on long range trajectory.

    That said, Blackfoot gave you an outstanding answer. A plain .300WM is plenty, and ammo for it does not cost very much. My favorite is the .338WM, but that's me, because that's what I use in Alaska.
    Last edited by RayfromAK; 06-17-2007 at 17:52.

  6. #6
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    You will gets lots of good info and many opinions here I'm sure. I was looking for an all around sheep/moose/bear rifle last year and ended up buying a Kimber Montana 325wsm. With the VX III 2.5-8x36, Talley bases/rings and light sling it weighs 7lbs. I shot a Dall ram and a moose last year at long ranges with the factory 200gr accubonds. You can get 220gr bullets for it also.

    To me it is an excellent combo.

  7. #7
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    300 Weatherby is my favorite all-around gun. You can buy one from Weatherby that weighs 6 3/4# off the shelf. It shoots long, flat, and packs a punch. If I could only own one rifle it'd be a 300 Wby.

    On the other hand, if you're hunting bear with a guide you have the luxury of having somebody else to back you up. A 270 or 30.06 might serve your long-term use better, be less expensive, and would be lighter. The guide factor may allow you to go a little under-gunned for that hunt. Ask your guide what he thinks.
    Last edited by Mr. Pid; 06-17-2007 at 19:04.

  8. #8
    Member oakman's Avatar
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    I will throw another vote in for the .300 win mag. It is a very good all around gun, many companies make them, lots of choices on ammo, you can find ammo for it just about anywhere, it doesn't kick horribly, and it will kill a moose, a sheep, and a bear, and much more.

    Good luck.

  9. #9
    Member BigHorn Hunter's Avatar
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    I use the 300 WBY for most all mountian hunts of this type. I am a huge .30'06 fan as well and would use it without hesitation. But you didn't ask about that old veteran

  10. #10
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    Default rifle

    I would opt for a rifle which you can shoot very confortably and accurately. Especially with a guide, you don't really need to be concerned about bears to any extent. I have been hunting sheep in AK since '66 and over the years have used a .308, a 300 win and for the last ten years have carried a 270. I have also bow hunted with my son and neither of us have had a firearm. A good number of other archers also hunt that way. If you are careful with your campsites, keep food away from camp and in general just remain alert, you shouldn't have any problems. A 30'06 is a good option also. The heavier magnums will indeed feel much heavier after a few days of climbing and often induce flinching.

  11. #11
    Member schmidty_dog's Avatar
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    7mm Rem Mag. Just make your shots count and it'll do its job just fine.

  12. #12

    Default Thanks

    Thanks for all the great advice guys, I'm thinking the .300 but I'll let you know

  13. #13
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    Default always go bigger

    Pick your cal, bullets and bullet weight for the biggest and toughest game you will encounter.

    That choice will work for the lighter game too.

    Never heard anybody complain about having too much gun for bear.

    Always hear about the one that got away and just how small calibers seemed when the fat hit the fire.

    jedi

  14. #14

    Default My Two Cents

    Cizmo,

    Here are my thoughts, worth about what you paid for them:

    Talk to Jake first, he's on here often between hunts and has a lot of good thoughts. You may have a priority species preference (for sheep or griz) that dictates what your caliber might be.

    If you were leaning toward the .300, let me chime in that there's not a lot of difference between the .300 and the .30-06, when shooting high-energy factory .06 loads; if you reload, you can come even closer to the .300 performance with the .06, and you can pick up ammo for it on short notice just about anywhere in Alaska that you can get ammo.

    Now for the humor part - if Jake is toting his .416 along with you, heck, get a .257 Roberts or .270! He's got your back if you find a griz...

    Michael

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    Standard reply to this question: if you have to ask, get a 30-06 and shoot appropriate ammo, regardless of target species.

  16. #16

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    You say you have no experience purchasing a gun. How much experience do you have shooting? I ask because if you don't have much, either rifle will recoil too much for you to learn to shoot accurately in a short period. With a guide on back-up, the -06 would be a better choice. If not, anything can kill a sheep but for Bear, .338 and 250 grain premium bullets as a minimum.

  17. #17
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    Although I have both a .338 WM and a .300 WSM, I am loving the .300 WSM more and more every day. The Short Action makes a big difference in the weight and in the Weatherby Vanguard, with a synthetic stock, does not kick much at all - Much, much less than my son's .300 WM in a Winchester Black Shadow Model 70! Topped with a Leupold VX-III, 3.5-10 X 40, the Weatherby is the cat's meow! Very accurate too!

  18. #18

    Default agree

    I agree with driveacub, the gun you can shoot the best is always your best bet. Personally, I have used a .338 w/ 210 Nosler Partitions all my life, and have been very successful with this gun and load. After many years of using this combo; I am very confident hunting any big game animal in Alaska.

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