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Thread: Hauling Kevlar Canoe

  1. #1
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    Default Hauling Kevlar Canoe

    Just thinking I'd like to get some pro advice about hauling my canoe - where I have it on my rack now seems to make sense to me based upon the shape of the gunwale - or should it be moved back - more balanced between front & back?
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    Member tod osier's Avatar
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    We usually travel everywhere with our canoe on top the truck (Wenonah Kevlar escape), but we did a similar trip to AK in 2013 (8 weeks) and did not bring it. I didn't really miss it (other than a couple times and I still didn't need it). Depends on your goals, but we were looking for salmon and graying, both of which we found without a canoe. We were really focused on fishing flowing water in AK, but usually fish flat water in the canoe elsewhere. Drive up and back and in AK is going to pound it pretty good, so make sure it is on there good and that the racks are attached well.

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    what you have should work , but what I would recomend is 3 things # 1 you need a safty rope from the front bumber off both cornners to a cented point then to the front of the canoe [ leading front ] [ so it dont move side to side an can't lift up it don't have to be real tight just taunt]
    this also stops the canoe from moving back , # 2 one on the back to back bumber from both cornners up the the back of canoe , [ it stops movement side to side an forward , this is your safty ropes side to side an forward & backward, # 3 there is a product called rubber rope
    about 1/2 / thick you buy by the [foot or yard not sure ] there are special hooks to put on the ends , so you make the rope with the hooks , to fit the mid section on the racks , you strich the rope over the canoe an attach it to the racks , an one regular rope over the top , a little over kill
    but I have travled from coast to coast an up the HY to Alaska an never had a problem an doing HY speed up to 85 MPH , the canoe might move a 1/4 inch an then the rubber rope tightends up an will hold tight , NOTE rubber rope will do all the holding reg rope for safty
    rubber rope is stretched to hold an the regular rope is taunt you could use straps in sted of regular rope once you do all this you will not have to stop an tighten the canoe up on your trips SID
    PS rubber rope is not Bungee cords

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    Tod: yes, like flowing water fishing too - but I don't want to find nice lakes & waterways that all I can do is stare at!

    Sid: thanks for tips - will secure it well - overkill is better than UNDERkill - I've done that before. Better to be safe than sorry

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    I haul a Voyager around on my truck for four months every year (Thule rack)...The best way to secure the lightweight Kevlar canoe is by the thwarts. I line up the two racks with the thwarts and secure with 4ea NRS straps. You do not want to tie the ends down and force the center of the canoe to flex... The Voyager and the Escape are not rigid enough (in the Kevlar version) to tie down in that fashion...

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    Quote Originally Posted by pipercub View Post
    I haul a Voyager around on my truck for four months every year (Thule rack)...The best way to secure the lightweight Kevlar canoe is by the thwarts. I line up the two racks with the thwarts and secure with 4ea NRS straps. You do not want to tie the ends down and force the center of the canoe to flex... The Voyager and the Escape are not rigid enough (in the Kevlar version) to tie down in that fashion...
    i thought of tying the thwart to the rack as they are lined up exactly as it shows in the photo. Yes, wouldn't want to make the rope tied to front or back so tight it puts too much pressure on boat. Thanks

  7. #7
    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    I use black rubber tiedowns for all my canoe racks.
    Balance is always a good idea with equal distance from each canoe end.
    I like my rack to be positioned as far apart as possible also.
    I like rubber or carpet on my gunnal L brackets.. rubber is best,, wont slide around or show any wear..
    I use outdoor carpet on my canoe trailers..
    The Rubber tiedowns have never failed me in over 25 years of being in the canoe shuttle business.
    I get the 36 inch long ones, I replace the S hooks with solid hoops and secure the hoops by pulling them over the pipe ends of the racks,, such as the Yakima racks and such,, I have I think 4 car top racks I use ,, Thule, and Yakima brand for my suburbans..
    I used to purchase canoes in Canada and drive from the kenai to British Colombia and the Yukon with a 10 place trailer and car top carrier on my suburban so I could carry 12 canoes at a time. traveling 4 thousand miles on such purchase trips..
    over gravel, and frost heaves ,, no matter.. never a failure, never a canoe damage from the rack, .
    Front and rear rope Tie downs,,, I Have not use these since the 1980's a front and back rope to keep the canoe straight?.. the L shape brackets on the rack keep the canoe facing forward and will not drift.
    my canoe trailer has been in the air many times with a load of canoes on it as I hit a frost heave I failed to see intime..
    actually bending an axel at one time.. but never lost a canoe, or had it even move.
    before I felt comfortable with just using the rubber tiedowns, I used to use cinch straps ( Nylon 1" wide,, and rachet strap also .. but I quit doing that years ago.. Only do I use rachet straps on vehicles without a top carrier,, where I use the foam pads as the rack,,
    Don't report me please to the cops,, but I sometimes drive over 80 MPH going down the road with not so much as a bobble .. using just two rubber straps to keep my canoe in place,,,, OH I know,, your thinking,, he's going 80 mph using two rubber tiedowns and trusting them on his $2800 canoes????? yup..
    I have Kevlar canoes , royalex, aluminum, fiberglass, and plastic.. all travel the same..
    My biggest fear now days in Canada trips ??? its theft.... Yes.. I have had two Kayaks stolen off one rack,, and I have reports all the time from folks that come to my campground that have lost kayaks, canoes, Generators, Fuel cans, anything that is not cable locked down...
    Put a cable thru your seat or center yoke etc and put a pad lock on it..
    cuz these little towns along the way have been doing this stuff for years,, and they can see an easy few hundred bucks ,, or even thousands with a Kevlar canoe,, and NO way of ever getting it back... your in a foreign country and these guys have been doing it for a long time...
    When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaskacanoe View Post
    I use black rubber tiedowns for all my canoe racks.
    Balance is always a good idea with equal distance from each canoe end.
    I like my rack to be positioned as far apart as possible also.
    I like rubber or carpet on my gunnal L brackets.. rubber is best,, wont slide around or show any wear..
    I use outdoor carpet on my canoe trailers..
    The Rubber tiedowns have never failed me in over 25 years of being in the canoe shuttle business.
    I get the 36 inch long ones, I replace the S hooks with solid hoops and secure the hoops by pulling them over the pipe ends of the racks,, such as the Yakima racks and such,, I have I think 4 car top racks I use ,, Thule, and Yakima brand for my suburbans..
    I used to purchase canoes in Canada and drive from the kenai to British Colombia and the Yukon with a 10 place trailer and car top carrier on my suburban so I could carry 12 canoes at a time. traveling 4 thousand miles on such purchase trips..
    over gravel, and frost heaves ,, no matter.. never a failure, never a canoe damage from the rack, .
    Front and rear rope Tie downs,,, I Have not use these since the 1980's a front and back rope to keep the canoe straight?.. the L shape brackets on the rack keep the canoe facing forward and will not drift.
    my canoe trailer has been in the air many times with a load of canoes on it as I hit a frost heave I failed to see intime..
    actually bending an axel at one time.. but never lost a canoe, or had it even move.
    before I felt comfortable with just using the rubber tiedowns, I used to use cinch straps ( Nylon 1" wide,, and rachet strap also .. but I quit doing that years ago.. Only do I use rachet straps on vehicles without a top carrier,, where I use the foam pads as the rack,,
    Don't report me please to the cops,, but I sometimes drive over 80 MPH going down the road with not so much as a bobble .. using just two rubber straps to keep my canoe in place,,,, OH I know,, your thinking,, he's going 80 mph using two rubber tiedowns and trusting them on his $2800 canoes????? yup..
    I have Kevlar canoes , royalex, aluminum, fiberglass, and plastic.. all travel the same..
    My biggest fear now days in Canada trips ??? its theft.... Yes.. I have had two Kayaks stolen off one rack,, and I have reports all the time from folks that come to my campground that have lost kayaks, canoes, Generators, Fuel cans, anything that is not cable locked down...
    Put a cable thru your seat or center yoke etc and put a pad lock on it..
    cuz these little towns along the way have been doing this stuff for years,, and they can see an easy few hundred bucks ,, or even thousands with a Kevlar canoe,, and NO way of ever getting it back... your in a foreign country and these guys have been doing it for a long time...
    My rack is 8' apart. If I strap my canoe equally I'd have 4'6" overhang on each side, but because of the shape of the gunwale it makes it sit so much higher - it just doesn't seem to sit as well. Otherwise it's 2' overhang at the back 7' overhang on front. You must have some good rubber snubbers - I bought a bunch of them at Harbor Freight - garbage I tell you. I will put some bracket on the rack to keep it from shifting. Thanks for tips!

  9. #9
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    did not say rubber snubbers I said rubber rope it is as long as you want, you put the ends on it as you need with a handle to grip when you can pull the rubber [stretch it some ] an not pinch fingers when you hook it to your rack . the more you go over the front of the TK the more lift you will get from the wind of goind down he road, I let it hang off the back with a red flag it worked for me, look up rubber rope on the web
    SID

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