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Thread: Unit 7/15 black bear

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    Default Unit 7/15 black bear

    If anyone who has experience hunting black bears in these units could PM me I would greatly appreciate it. Thank you!

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    What do you want to know? There are a lot of us here that have experience in those units. Perhaps a clearer idea of what info you're looking for might draw more of a response?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    What do you want to know? There are a lot of us here that have experience in those units. Perhaps a clearer idea of what info you're looking for might draw more of a response?
    I am looking for any insight on black bear hunting on the slopes along the seward highway in mid-late august. (like what to realistically expect as far as being able to shoot a bear by hiking up drainages and glassing the slopes along the highway north of seward, I believe it would be in the Chugach NF)

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    I would realistically expect a very high degree of success. The big factors are, your physical condition, your primary equipment, High quality binoculars, quality spotting scope, Pack frame, Skinning and/or fleshing skills. But the main factor is your ability to climb in that country. August will be very thick vegetation, rain likely, hot and humid.

    We could help you better if we knew more about you.


    Quote Originally Posted by huntfishtrap247 View Post
    I am looking for any insight on black bear hunting on the slopes along the seward highway in mid-late august. (like what to realistically expect as far as being able to shoot a bear by hiking up drainages and glassing the slopes along the highway north of seward, I believe it would be in the Chugach NF)

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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    I would realistically expect a very high degree of success....the main factor is your ability to climb
    there you go...
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
    http://www.alaskabackcountryhunters.org/

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    Thanks guys. I am in good shape, and will definitely be able to climb. I will have a good set of 10x42 bino's, and obviously some good rain gear. Is the typical way to hunt these bears by spotting them from the roadside with binos/spotting scope and then attempting a stalk, or hiking to a peak and glassing down along the slopes?

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    Quote Originally Posted by huntfishtrap247 View Post
    Is the typical way to hunt these bears by spotting them from the roadside with binos/spotting scope and then attempting a stalk, or hiking to a peak and glassing down along the slopes?
    I usually don't go after one up there unless I see it first........lol

    The thing that does make it tougher though is the amount of foliage to be able to see through. A lot easier in the spring....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Both........That time of years, most Black Bears are harvested by Mt. Goat and/or Dall Sheep and/or Caribou hunters.


    Quote Originally Posted by huntfishtrap247 View Post
    Thanks guys. I am in good shape, and will definitely be able to climb. I will have a good set of 10x42 bino's, and obviously some good rain gear. Is the typical way to hunt these bears by spotting them from the roadside with binos/spotting scope and then attempting a stalk, or hiking to a peak and glassing down along the slopes?

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    There is a LOT more "HELL" to climbing in that country than you are likely expecting. Alders and Willows and Devils Club, so thick you not see or touch the ground for long periods. Some of that is Monkey Country. Bring a good Bow Saw.

    Quote Originally Posted by huntfishtrap247 View Post
    Thanks guys. I am in good shape, and will definitely be able to climb. I will have a good set of 10x42 bino's, and obviously some good rain gear. Is the typical way to hunt these bears by spotting them from the roadside with binos/spotting scope and then attempting a stalk, or hiking to a peak and glassing down along the slopes?

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    I just had to respond to this quote by saying well said. "Alders and Willows and Devils Club, so thick you not see or touch the ground for long periods. Some of that is Monkey Country". Spot on! I like wearing in-step cleats too but surprisingly there are not many options in Anchor Town.
    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    There is a LOT more "HELL" to climbing in that country than you are likely expecting. Alders and Willows and Devils Club, so thick you not see or touch the ground for long periods. Some of that is Monkey Country. Bring a good Bow Saw.

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    Plus the ground is slicker than "SNOT" with decaying vegetation. I wear logging boots.

  12. #12

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    Not trying to discourage you. There are a lot of bears in that country.

    Maybe Brian M. will be kind enough to show the photo of the lovely lady who allows him to live with her. Lovely Lady, BIG Bear, and another Black Bear who just felt the need to be in the Photo'shoot.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    There is a LOT more "HELL" to climbing in that country than you are likely expecting. Alders and Willows and Devils Club, so thick you not see or touch the ground for long periods. Some of that is Monkey Country. Bring a good Bow Saw.
    Not too mention the invisible obstacles. The ones you can't see from the road or until you are right there at them. The sudden cliffs and rock ledges, waterfall chutes, scree slopes and the shale..... Bring a first aid kit and do wear rugged gloves for climbing. You can get hurt real fast out there. What may look like a simple hike up can quickly turn into a foot blistering, hand/ finger slicing, sweat drenched, cursed endeavor. Pick your path carefully from below with binos and look the country between you and the bear over very closely.



    Release Lake Trout

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    Maybe Brian M. will be kind enough to show the photo of the lovely lady who allows him to live with her. Lovely Lady, BIG Bear, and another Black Bear who just felt the need to be in the Photo'shoot.
    Brag on my wife? Well...if you insist.







    As for bear hunting in the Kenai Mts, the posts above nailed it. Spotting a bear feeding on berries is generally the easy part. Successfully harvesting one will be equal parts fitness, luck, and the other details that go into a hunt (weather, gear, etc.). I've spent a fair bit of time chasing bears in those mountains. On some days it all works out perfectly (like you see in these pictures), while on other days it doesn't. If spotting from the road, anticipate seeing multiple bears each day, but don't expect more than a 10% success rate. A huge reason for that is because they're high. AGL isn't exaggerating when he mentions that - we were goat hunting when my wife got that bear, and we were at least 500-1,000' above the goats when we took this boar. We chased bears on this same ridge this past year (unsuccessfully), and the same was true. Figure that an average stalk from the road is going to be at least 1.5-3 hours of climbing, and that is a lot of time for a bear to simply move on.

    It's an excellent hunt and you'll almost certainly see bears whether you're spotting from the road or hiking in before looking. Just understand that it is mountain hunting with all of the challenges that entails. Good luck to you, and if you take one, don't leave the meat behind. Those berry bears are first rate eating.


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    First of all, thanks for the information guys. Nothing you have said is discouraging, I'm willing to work for it, just want to have some fun doing it and have the opportunity to put a stalk on a few bears. Brian that's a beauty of a bear, and it sure looks high up!

    When you all say its incredibly thick stuff, are you talking about the vegetation near the road in the low spots? How far (typically) is the walk through this thick stuff before you break out of it?

    You guys say it's too thick to see through, does that mean it's too thick for glassing, or only too thick when you're actually walking through the thick lowlands?

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by huntfishtrap247 View Post
    When you all say its incredibly thick stuff, are you talking about the vegetation near the road in the low spots? How far (typically) is the walk through this thick stuff before you break out of it?
    It totally depends. There are places where you can pick your way through the thick stuff by following avalanche chutes and other bare areas. On some mountains you can almost miss the alders entirely, whereas in other areas you're looking at 500-1,000' of really tough bushwhacking. Each mountain is different, and I'd highly recommend making a plan for the climb before you leave your glassing area. Try to get a really good mental picture of what it's going to look like during the climb and where you need to make your lateral moves from one clear area to another. That is one nice thing about basing your hunt from some of the hiking trails - some of them will get you above treeline pretty easily.

    As for the bear above, we spotted it from the road, but then took a rudimentary trail known only to a few that looped around the back side of the mountain. It was nearly three hours from when we spotted the bear to when we saw it again after the climb. Thankfully it was still in the area (as was one of the other two bears we saw from the road). This year the opposite was true - bear spotted in the same spot, same approach taken, but no bear was to be found once we gained the ridge.

  17. #17

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    Before the leaves open on May12'th in that area, ALL game stands out clearly. After the leaves open up, all you can see is leaves. There could be 26,000 black bears and 15,000 elephants on the hillside and all you see are leaves. Just a wall of green. It is like an ultra thick jungle.

    Quote Originally Posted by huntfishtrap247 View Post
    You guys say it's too thick to see through, does that mean it's too thick for glassing, or only too thick when you're actually walking through the thick lowlands?

  18. #18

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    One of the great things about this Alaska Outdoors Forum is the massive amount of time many members have in any given area of Alaska.

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    I reley on spotting bears BEFORE the climb in the spring. sep. and oct. I rely on trails that take me up to areas that I know bears are. I don't think you need to see a bear to climb. Find some trails that get you in to a area you can see. if you do that every weekend for a month you will most certainly have learned something and start focusing your effort on the areas you saw the most sign or bears.

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    I guess I'm getting mixed views of hunting this way. Brian you're saying that spotting bears in late august from the road is a very effective way to hunt them, but AGL is saying that spotting them will be impossible with the vegetation of mid-late august. AGL you also said that you would expect a very high degree of success with this hunt, but if you cant spot them from the road how do you go about hunting them?

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