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Thread: Questions for someone wanting to move to Alaska

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    Default Questions for someone wanting to move to Alaska

    Hey everyone. I joined this thread to get some questions answered. Some of them regard transportation.

    How common are roadways in the context of having a ATV vs a truck? Which is more practical?

    How much of the year can you use an ATV?

    What amount of money would you recommend setting aside for buying an ATV for someone like myself who would like to move up there?

    For those of you who rely on an ATV for transportation, how reliable is a good ATV, and how much money does it cost annually for maintenance and gas?

    What ATV/type of ATV would you recommend?

    Thanks to all of those who respond. I have many questions and I'm trying to post a few each day in the appropriate forum category. If you would like to help out a future Alaskan then please look at some of my other posts and give me as much advice as you want.

    Thanks again.
    Kent

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    A lot of your questions can be answered with a little more information. Where are you planning on moving to and what uses do you plan on? There are places that one can ride a ATV on a regular basis and then there are places that you do not want to get caught riding.

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    Alaska's not quite like the tv depicts. Living in a city one would naturally use a truck. Living in a village would be a different story just as akbearcat suggests

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    Quote Originally Posted by Happily View Post
    Alaska's not quite like the tv depicts.
    The HELL you say! Ya think?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kent15 View Post
    Hey everyone. I joined this thread to get some questions answered. Some of them regard transportation.

    How common are roadways in the context of having a ATV vs a truck? Which is more practical?

    How much of the year can you use an ATV?

    What amount of money would you recommend setting aside for buying an ATV for someone like myself who would like to move up there?

    For those of you who rely on an ATV for transportation, how reliable is a good ATV, and how much money does it cost annually for maintenance and gas?

    What ATV/type of ATV would you recommend?

    Thanks to all of those who respond. I have many questions and I'm trying to post a few each day in the appropriate forum category. If you would like to help out a future Alaskan then please look at some of my other posts and give me as much advice as you want.

    Thanks again.
    Kent


    Kent, ever want to see what living in the bush is all about come visit me. Would be glad to show you what it's all about!

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    Quote Originally Posted by AK Bearcat View Post
    A lot of your questions can be answered with a little more information. Where are you planning on moving to and what uses do you plan on? There are places that one can ride a ATV on a regular basis and then there are places that you do not want to get caught riding.
    I dont know where i want to end up. I dont know enough about the state or how to live there to say.
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...d-my-questions

    I was told that many places in Alaska can't be accesed via roadway. Just trying to get an idea on how ATVs are used by those of you who do use them.

    For example, If you rely on an ATV what do you do if in breaks down? Do you have the tools and spare parts to fix it? Do you have a backup mode of transportation? Are you screwed? If you are to depend on an ATV then what shoud someone who is buying one look for from your perspective?

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    Most of us, or at least I do, carry a lot spare tools, emergency survival gear, and some form of communication.

    Also it is strongly recommended that you tell someone of your plan as to where you're going when you'll be back, and when to send the troopers after you.

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    OP, as you will soon find out 'much of Alaska is NOT along any road system'! For those places that are not on the road system, ATV's/snow machine(the riding type) are very common and a way of life. That being the case, one needs to have a good understanding on how to make repairs to their machines. While it would be nice to have a lot of extra parts on hand, that is not always possible. One will need to learn how to make repairs with what ever they have on hand. Something else to look into is how well machine hold up. Some of them will require a little more maintenance then others.
    As a side note, living off the road system is NOT for everyone, but can be a wonderful way of life.

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    If you can't fix or maintain your own form of remote transportation (wheeler/sled) I would suggest not living somewhere remote.

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    Kent15:

    I would highly suggest getting a copy of 'The Milepost' to learn more about this state regarding the road system. It is an amazing place to live, but you could spend many lifetimes here and never see most of it. I see you posted under the snowmachine area as well, and seem to be feeling out what it is like here. Use the internet and the library under this site's 'store' and learn as much as you can. Then get a ticket and come visit and see as much as you can afford to do so....Depending on what line of work you will be doing may affect where you want to be just based on opportunity. Most of the folks on these forums are a big help, but sometimes the only answer to be given correctly is a "it depends".
    BEE

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    [QUOTE=Kent15;1452373]
    I was told that many places in Alaska can't be accesed via roadway. Just trying to get an idea on how ATVs are used by those of you who do use them.
    QUOTE]

    This is quite true. BUT, many, many of those places you are not going to go. There is no housing there. No place to rent or even buy. Native villages are going to be a tough place to live. Doable, yes, but it is not like on the TV shows. The natives may not even let you into the village to begin with and you might even need permission just to visit. I have lived in Elim, Shaktoolik, Akiak, and been to many other villages. You really need to do a lot of research.

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    [QUOTE=Daveinthebush;1452624]
    Quote Originally Posted by Kent15 View Post
    I was told that many places in Alaska can't be accesed via roadway. Just trying to get an idea on how ATVs are used by those of you who do use them.
    QUOTE]

    This is quite true. BUT, many, many of those places you are not going to go. There is no housing there. No place to rent or even buy. Native villages are going to be a tough place to live. Doable, yes, but it is not like on the TV shows. The natives may not even let you into the village to begin with and you might even need permission just to visit. I have lived in Elim, Shaktoolik, Akiak, and been to many other villages. You really need to do a lot of research.
    Yeah i talked to a guy over the phone a couple of days ago that i had met on here. He lived in one of these native villages. I have a lot to learn. The biggest leasson i learned from that call is i do not want to live in a village with natives. He seemed to enjoy it but i don't think i could handle the non sense, if i were to even get accepted.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKBEE View Post
    Kent15:

    I would highly suggest getting a copy of 'The Milepost' to learn more about this state regarding the road system. It is an amazing place to live, but you could spend many lifetimes here and never see most of it. I see you posted under the snowmachine area as well, and seem to be feeling out what it is like here. Use the internet and the library under this site's 'store' and learn as much as you can. Then get a ticket and come visit and see as much as you can afford to do so....Depending on what line of work you will be doing may affect where you want to be just based on opportunity. Most of the folks on these forums are a big help, but sometimes the only answer to be given correctly is a "it depends".
    BEE
    Thanks for the reply. I have just purchased Milepost. 169 reviews with five stars on amazon. I'm a machinist right now. I will be waiting for the summer of 2016 in order to save mmoney for my move up there. I have been taught how to weld as well, although not certified. I was told that i had a pretty nature learning ability for welding. I think both mig and tig are super fun. Ive considered using the last of my gi bill to do the welding program at the same community college i learned machining at. If i am a experienced machinist and certified welder with 15 grand in the back i would imgine, correct me if im wrong, that i could find someone to allow for the exception and hire someone before they live there. Thanks for the response and book recommendation.

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    Quote Originally Posted by alaskankid13 View Post
    Most of us, or at least I do, carry a lot spare tools, emergency survival gear, and some form of communication.

    Also it is strongly recommended that you tell someone of your plan as to where you're going when you'll be back, and when to send the troopers after you.
    I don't know if this is off topic for this section of the fourm. but i would imagine that you are very limited with space. I would Imagine some standard toold to have on your ATV with you would be adjustable wrench, socket set, vice grips and a hammer. What else is a common thing to carry?

    What do you mean by emergency survival gear. I have no clue what to bring if i were gonna go on a camping trip in an alaskan winter, so on this one im not even gonna take a shot. I mean i would imagine a sleeping bag, but what kind and what rating i have no idea. A fire starting tool is in there i bet.

    As far as communication is concerned i would imagine a handheld ham radio should be in the survival bag. If not a ham type radio then what kind?

    Thanks for the response.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kent15 View Post
    ...i do not want to live in a village with natives.
    That kind of attitude will not win you a lot of friends in 90% of Alaska. You'll probably want to focus on real estate in Wasilla.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kent15 View Post
    I don't know if this is off topic for this section of the fourm. but i would imagine that you are very limited with space. I would Imagine some standard toold to have on your ATV with you would be adjustable wrench, socket set, vice grips and a hammer. What else is a common thing to carry?

    What do you mean by emergency survival gear. I have no clue what to bring if i were gonna go on a camping trip in an alaskan winter, so on this one im not even gonna take a shot. I mean i would imagine a sleeping bag, but what kind and what rating i have no idea. A fire starting tool is in there i bet.

    As far as communication is concerned i would imagine a handheld ham radio should be in the survival bag. If not a ham type radio then what kind?

    Thanks for the response.
    On ATV's or side by sides we always end up carrying an external bag or action packer(tote) with tools in it and it the mentioned survival gear. What goes in the box usually depends on where we are going and how Long we intend to be gone.

    Normal things that end up in the box are,
    -Small Socket set metric/standard
    -screw driver with bits such as flathead, torx, Phillips and whatever special kinda your machine might need.
    -tow strap, extends your winch reach as well as it serves the obvious purpose.
    -rain gear, alaska has a mind of its own here.
    -pliers(multi tool)
    -channel locks
    -duct tape
    -zip ties
    -couple of knives
    -first aid kit
    -water container
    -3 ways to starter a fire(matches, flint/steel, lighter)
    -hand warmers
    -100'+ parachute cord
    -extra layers
    -snacks
    -satellite phone


    While there is more on certain trips and sometimes less it all depends. A lot of people carry tire plug kits, some carry jumper cables as well. All good things to have. You will complain about how much stuff you have till you need it.

    Also the more you go out and start exploring or working on your own machine you will soon start to develop your own personalized tool kit for your needs and your specific machine.

    As for communication...cell phones aren't very reliable up here. Yes you will have service a lot of places nowadays but it's often times you don't that you need it the most. So there are several options out there...
    -satellite phone, is what I carry. Initial cost is pricy, peace of mind is priceless.

    SPOT- another good system to research to help others find you

    Gps- helps you know where you are and how far help is or to help the people find you.

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    The biggest leasson i learned from that call is i do not want to live in a village with natives

    Kent 15, one of the first things you will need to do is to change your attitude towards our 'natives'! While they may seem to be difficult to live with or understand, they can be great people to know and work with. One of the big problems is that they have a different way of looking at things then non-natives do. I have only lived in Alaska 45 years, but have known and have worked with a good number of natives, but you need to be able to understand and except their way of thinking. The natives up here are no different then people anyplace else, in that you have some that are great and some that you really need to stay away from. If one spends any amount of time is Alaska, one will find they we all are a 'little' different and that is what makes Alaska the place that it is.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AK Bearcat View Post
    The biggest leasson i learned from that call is i do not want to live in a village with natives

    Kent 15, one of the first things you will need to do is to change your attitude towards our 'natives'! While they may seem to be difficult to live with or understand, they can be great people to know and work with. One of the big problems is that they have a different way of looking at things then non-natives do. I have only lived in Alaska 45 years, but have known and have worked with a good number of natives, but you need to be able to understand and except their way of thinking. The natives up here are no different then people anyplace else, in that you have some that are great and some that you really need to stay away from. If one spends any amount of time is Alaska, one will find they we all are a 'little' different and that is what makes Alaska the place that it is.
    Agreed, it's a different culture and what's crazy is that just over 100 years ago these were intact indigenous communities......not the odd mix of old and new that they are today. I'm not gonna say that it's easy to work and live with this culture when you have a very western upbringing and outlook, but there also needs to be a smidgeon of empathy for some of the challenges these communities face. I spent my first 7 years here living in a bush village and it was indeed challenging and there are many parts of it I do not miss......... and you can avoid that if you want, but please try to couch your words more effectively. The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot.

    And while I've got your ear, I've looked through all of these posts and threads of yours as you are about the age I was when I got truly earnest about getting to AK and I was intrigued. You need to watch less tv and read more books (nonfiction please) about Alaska so that you don't ooze so much misinformation. Also, you need to plan a visit, and do it soon, so that you can see what winter temps and darkness are all about, and figure out how much of the state has roads, what doesn't and where a machinist is likely to live (i.e. not in a Yukon village). I appreciate that you are at the starting phase, but you need to do some more research before peppering this forum with questions that can be answered without looking such a noob.

    When I came up here, I volunteered for my first job for three months despite having a couple years experience in the field. I new next to nothing about it all and went with an open mind and worked out in the Kusko area, hungout in Kenai, Homer, and all the way up to Fairbanks and got a taste for it all. The next year I got real serious about returning from what I had experienced, and had at least some idea of what I was getting into. One trip of that sort and you would rule out this idea of living off the land up here, regulations and weather preclude that being a completely doable dealio without some kind of income. Some folks do it, they are rare, and it's not glamorous I am sure. IMO you have a much much better chance of getting off the grid and living off the land somewhere down there where you can grow crops and raise animals much easier. Small game and deer and hogs can easily supplement your farming, access to a few bass and crappie ponds can get you some fish, and you won't have to heat your home 10 months a year.

    Now, if you wish to hunt or observe world class animals, have great views, experience winter in it's best and worst states, observe intact ecosystems, interact with other independent types, and be challenged daily by the environment whether it's butt cold or hot and buggy.......Alaska is your place. If you just want some peace and quiet that can be found elsewhere much easier.....so figure out what you really want. I do not feel you are at the point at which you can bug other folks with your questions with how little research I perceive you have done on your own.

    But the rest of you can carry on.

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    Quote Originally Posted by iofthetaiga View Post
    That kind of attitude will not win you a lot of friends in 90% of Alaska. You'll probably want to focus on real estate in Wasilla.


    I heard the house next to Palin is for sale! Kent15, my previous offer to visit my neck of the woods if you happened by is now null and void. Mt best friend and river neighbor is native and I for one do not wish to house some one who feels the native culture is Nonsense! Good luck with that attitude!

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    One lower 48er Mis-words something and everyone is ready to draw and quarter him or leave him to freeze and die.

    Poor guy is just getting some opinions here, and appears to have gotten the stereotypical native talk.

    Maybe instead of banishing someone who is clueless you should teach and educate instead of bash and disown.

    My .2 cents here.

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