Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 34

Thread: Question for someone wanting to move up to Alaska.

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    29

    Default Question for someone wanting to move up to Alaska.

    Hey everyone. I joined the forum because i have a lot of questions. Some of my questions regaurd hunting. Here they are...

    For living off the land purposes, is it more practical to raise some animals for a food supply, or is wildlife so abundant that hunting and fishing is the way to go?

    What game is there to practically hunt for food in Alaska?

    What is the most common animal that is hunted for food in Alaska?

    If you were to get all meat from the wilderness, what would be the minimum number of of different chamberings you would need to practically do that and what would you recommend?

    Other than the meat and hide, what are common uses for the rest of the animal?


    In the places where people do this sort of thing, how common and expensive is ammo?

    Thanks to all of those who respond.
    Kent

  2. #2

    Default

    Welcome.

    Just to be clear, there are very few people who can actually live off the land up here. It is a common desire and many make attempts, but in reality, it is extremely difficult and most either fail outright or give up once they see reality.

    Before jumping into answers to your questions, I would suggest you spend some time browsing the threads in the "Relocating to Alaska" section here: http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ting-to-Alaska This discussion has happened a number of times and you will likely find many of the answers to the questions you have as well as answers to a number of things you haven't realized you need to ask.

  3. #3
    Member Tearbear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    1,986

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by anchskier View Post
    ...Before jumping into answers to your questions, I would suggest you spend some time browsing the threads in the "Relocating to Alaska" section here: http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ting-to-Alaska This discussion has happened a number of times and you will likely find many of the answers to the questions you have as well as answers to a number of things you haven't realized you need to ask.
    What he said...
    "Grin and Bear It"

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,957

    Default

    Skier give you good advice. You are one of many that have a real misconception of Alaska. You in all probability will not be able to life off the land. You MUST follow hunting and fishing regulations. People in the lower 48 think there is game hiding behind every tree but no, there isn't, even in the areas that have trees. You would probably see more deer in North Caroline in a week end hunt then you will see moose. Moose are not a high density animal. Caribou are herd animals and if you miss the migration then you are not going to see much. All those Alaska reality shows you see down there have one thing in common, they are all staged and none are accurate. (Alaska State Troopers probably the closest).
    Do what skier advised and then come back and ask the questions. Don't consider completely living off the land, the land can be brutal and game is not that plentiful.

  5. #5
    Member Meanderthal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    288

    Default

    Don't rely on what you see on TV!

    It is almost all dramatized crap that Alaskans poke fun at.

    For example the folks on the show Frontier Alaska are interesting people indeed but the notion that they might go hungry if they don't kill (insert whatever they are hunting in this episode here) is just absurd. They are people of means who own businesses, buy, sell and rent real estate and drive late model cars past McDonald's on a regular basis. Scenes where they are supposedly in the wilderness have to be shot with the camera pointing in one direction the whole time to keep from showing condo developments in the background.

    Yukon Men is just as bad. Do you think the guys on the show are obese from eating garden vegetables and fresh salmon? They got that way by eating convenience store junk food like millions of other Americans.

    I could go on and on with this stuff.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Delta Jct, Alaska
    Posts
    992

    Default

    The number of Alaskans on food stamps far exceeds the number on subsistence foods.

  7. #7
    Member AKducks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    485

    Default

    Kent,
    A lot of what youíre asking depends on where you live. Firstoff I think you should think about moving to a city or town here in Alaska (fromother posts it seems like youíve been to southeast so I would start there.) acity would allow you access to a good job and community and still great accessto hunting and fishing. Once youíve lived here a few years then maybe startthinking about moving to a more subsistence lifestyle.

    Some of your other questions:
    Guns: I like the .338 win mag , Itís got more than enoughpower to take down any game, and enough power for bear protection ( there arebetter bear guns but if I was only buying one rifle thatís what I would go for) granted gun larger than a .270 would work for hunting. I also like to have a .22lr for small game (good luck finding ammo though).
    Regulations: for the most part you can hunt most of the yearbut the top times are fall ( august ĖSeptember) for moose ,caribou, sheep. Springtime for bears (april-June), Deer can be hunted from August to December insoutheast. And you will find lots of chances to hunt moose and caribou in thewinter depending on where you are. Before you hunt READ AND UNDERSTAND THEREGULATIONS!!!!

    Hope that helps!

  8. #8
    Member highestview's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Haines
    Posts
    1,308

    Default

    While alaska has larger game populations than many places in the lower 48, we have some of the lowest game densities in the country.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Born in Alaska: The boundary lines have fallen for me in pleasant places; surely I have a delightful inheritance. Psalm 16:6

  9. #9
    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,008

    Default

    Thanks for adding yet another thread to the hunting forum that 1) doesn't relate directly to hunting, and 2) is on a subject for which there is already a dedicated forum on this site.
    If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

  10. #10
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    13,396

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kent15 View Post
    Hey everyone. I joined the forum because i have a lot of questions. Some of my questions regaurd hunting. Here they are...

    For living off the land purposes, is it more practical to raise some animals for a food supply, or is wildlife so abundant that hunting and fishing is the way to go?

    What game is there to practically hunt for food in Alaska?

    What is the most common animal that is hunted for food in Alaska?

    If you were to get all meat from the wilderness, what would be the minimum number of of different chamberings you would need to practically do that and what would you recommend?

    Other than the meat and hide, what are common uses for the rest of the animal?


    In the places where people do this sort of thing, how common and expensive is ammo?

    Thanks to all of those who respond.
    Kent
    A few thoughts to add:

    -If you were raising animals for food, you'll have to purchase their feed. There is no real grazing range in Alaska, so while raising animals for food is potentially a viable option, you wouldn't really be "living off the land" in the sense of not paying for your food.

    -It is almost impossible to harvest enough wild food to live off of, but you can substantially supplement your diet with wild game. The difficult part, however, is accessing the various areas where these foods can be gathered. Caribou don't generally live in close proximity to great salmon runs. OK, perhaps a bad example, but the point remains. In addition to having low game densities, Alaska also has reasonably strict harvest limits. Taking one moose will add a lot of meat to your freezer, but it won't carry you through a year. Being able to add a lot of salmon to that, perhaps some halibut, etc. and you could be looking at providing all of your protein, but then of course there is the issue of plants and grains. Read the gardening forum - growing all of your own plant food would be difficult at best, or darn near impossible if I'm being honest.


    Spend a few hours reading through old threads from members bushrat and strangerinastrangeland. Those two come the closest to actually living off the land, and both are clear that they still need to buy much in order to maintain their lifestyle.

    If you really want to collect most of your food, I'd look hard at Southeast. You'll need to have a good source of income, though.

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    952

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Erik in AK View Post
    Thanks for adding yet another thread to the hunting forum that 1) doesn't relate directly to hunting, and 2) is on a subject for which there is already a dedicated forum on this site.
    Getting grumpy from the lack of snow Erik? Several of his questions where about hunting.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Gakona Ak
    Posts
    1,493

    Talking

    Kent:

    I am going to take a different approach to this. This is the way we did it with the new guys when I taught school in Kotz. Those of us who had made it through a few winters could almost tell with in a week what new teachers were going to make it past Christmas break so this is what we did when the questions like yours were asked by the new guys..

    Yes I think that you should buy a NEW Honda Forman......Yes I think you should buy a new Etec 600 and be sure to get the 154 inch track as well...Yes you should buy that boat ....By spring time I had a new boat, new Honda and a new Sno-go more than once!!

    Moving to the Great State needs to be done in phases because it is an inquires taste and very pricy! Go slow and see how the wife and kids like your new home and see if you can afford to live here!

    Walt
    Northwest Alaska Back Country Outfitters
    www.northwestalaska.net
    Attached Images Attached Images

  13. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gulkana Rafting View Post
    Yes I think that you should buy a NEW Honda Forman......Yes I think you should buy a new Etec 600 and be sure to get the 154 inch track as well...Yes you should buy that boat ....By spring time I had a new boat, new Honda and a new Sno-go more than once!!
    Made me laugh out loud

  14. #14
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wrangell
    Posts
    7,601

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Erik in AK View Post
    Thanks for adding yet another thread to the hunting forum that 1) doesn't relate directly to hunting, and 2) is on a subject for which there is already a dedicated forum on this site.
    Eric many of the hunting threads you start belong in the game management section. Should we call you on it each time?
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

  15. #15
    Member HuntAK59's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    527

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Erik in AK View Post
    Thanks for adding yet another thread to the hunting forum that 1) doesn't relate directly to hunting, and 2) is on a subject for which there is already a dedicated forum on this site.
    Now, now....a better response would have been "there are no game animals in alaska, they are over hunted and fished. berry picking is the way to go now."

    In all seriousness, if you are used to lower 48 hunting, welcome to the big boys league. I moved 5 years ago and its a different monster. I believe by your thread you mean "can I supplement my lifestyle off of fish and game." Yes, you can. Most of us on this site do it. It aint free, sure as hell aint cheap. But, its a lifestyle that gives far greater rewards then cash in your pocket. It gives self reliance, will teach you who you are and if not careful, will sure kill you. Most of my friends dont buy any meat. But, I could do that in PA as well, so its all about effort. You're not going to head into the mountains and get an animal unless you're lucky. Its about learning when where how here. Its not sitting in a tree stand where a deer trail is..... my 2 cents
    Grab a friend, a rifle and go hunt.

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Gakona Ak
    Posts
    1,493

    Default

    "Its about learning when where how here. Its not sitting in a tree stand where a deer trail is..... my 2 cents"

    Its about learning...yes it is. Very well put and lots of helpfully guys right here. Don't be proud and don't be shy!

    Walt
    Northwest Alaska Back Country Outfitters
    Drop Camps and Float Hunts
    Kotzebue-Unit 23

  17. #17
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction AK
    Posts
    4,056

    Default

    You can supplement your food supply here pretty readily..."living off the land" is a whole different matter.

    I probably hunt and fish for about 80-90% of our protein needs on an annual basis. Doing so probably costs 200% of what I could buy it in a store for...cept you can't buy game meat in any store nor the experience of gathering it DIY either. Hunting and fishing is generally going to require some travel and that costs money. If you live where you can effectively hunt out the back door- work (and money for everything else you need) is going to be really hard to come by.

    Farming your own livestock makes hunting look like a good deal financially.

    The most common subsistence animal is caribou where they are found and moose where they aren't.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    2,127

    Default

    You can certainly take care of the protein up here, the difference is that you will rarely be hunting mornings and evenings befor/after work. Even if you were in an area that was close enough to home, it's not like you are downing a 120lb deer and dragging it our and registering it on the way to work. (I miss hunting before and after work, just so's you know). It will be more about concentrated trips that are several days in length with greater expense than you are likely used to. Now, since a caribou is about twice to four times the size of a deer, and a moose is just lots more times the size of a deer, that freezer can get full pretty easy. But, you will find that you are not "hunting" as much as you may have used to. Even in Southeast where there is a 5 month deer season.....quick hunts are hard and it's almost always a day long affair and multi day trips away from town are where it's at for production. With four tags in your pocket......and the size of blacktails.....you had better expect to fill them all and get the wife into it if one expects to get your red meat with deer alone here. (they ain't all that big)

    You will hunt bigger, and more world class big stuff, but do not expect to be hunting all the time.....to expensive, and logistically difficult.

  19. #19

    Default

    Best way to live off the land, is get a high paying job in the OIL Industry. You will be living of the Earth, have massive amounts of money, you can buy all of the equipment you must have to be a "Real-Alaskan-Man".

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    1,378

    Default

    Hunting for a new resident is pretty expensive. You don't get that residency until you've been here a year. and as stated above, location is key. I'd love to hunt caribou or deer or even sheep or goat, but the cost is crazy high. I'm blessed to be in prime moose territory. Any size bull too, but I only get three weeks. I spent $250 in gas and oil and spent 6 days hunting. Three of those days were paid (school hunting trip) and the other days happened to be a weekend, plus one day after school. The school trip I deferred the possible moose to elders and students. But I pay a lot of money to live where I live.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •