View Poll Results: How often do you check your traps?

Voters
26. You may not vote on this poll
  • Once a day

    3 11.54%
  • Every other day

    1 3.85%
  • Twice a week

    10 38.46%
  • Once a week

    11 42.31%
  • Once every two weeks

    1 3.85%
  • Once every three weeks

    0 0%
  • Once a month

    0 0%
Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: What's the average length of time you let your traps sit between checks?

  1. #1

    Default What's the average length of time you let your traps sit between checks?

    Just curious. I don't do much trapping. I did a lot when I was a kid, but not anymore. But I am thinking about getting back into it. When I was a kid I checked my traps almost every day, but I didn't have a full time job. So I'm curious how often most people check their sets.

  2. #2

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    Oh, and for clarification I probably should have asked to specify if you are a trapper in AK or in another state. I know some people from out of state frequent this forum (like Smokey) and I'm sure the conditions are different for checks (i.e., remote locations in AK, snow machine access, dog team etc.) so for purposes of learning it would be helpful if you explain your reasoning for your answer.

  3. #3
    Member JuliW's Avatar
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    Hi Jack,

    When I used to trap, three days at most. I think much depends on the type of traps you use and the weather. I don't think it is fair for any animal to be held in a foot hold for more than 2 days (except beaver on drowning sets or marten in pole sets that die quickly from the cold). Offset jaws do allow blood flow to the foot and less liklihood of an animal chewing its own foot off...but once the foot dies, the animal may start chewing at the thing that is holding it, and since it can't feel the foot, that is likely to be chewed on too.

    Snares and conibears can go for more time if the weather is good. Also - even a conibear can hold an animal and not kill it - lost a wolverine that way once.

    Weather also plays a roll - with traps that kill... if temps aren't cold enough to freeze the animal fairly quickly, you could end up with a rotten hide. Also scavengers, ravens and birds that find dead trapped animals can ruin the pelt.

    I don't know what the 'rule of thumb' is for the trappers association..but I would say 3 days or less is a good rule of thumb.

    Besides if you are making regular trips to check your line, I think there is less liklihood of animal and trap theft.

    Good luck on your ventures.
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  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JuliW View Post
    Hi Jack,

    When I used to trap, three days at most. I think much depends on the type of traps you use and the weather. I don't think it is fair for any animal to be held in a foot hold for more than 2 days (except beaver on drowning sets or marten in pole sets that die quickly from the cold). Offset jaws do allow blood flow to the foot and less liklihood of an animal chewing its own foot off...but once the foot dies, the animal may start chewing at the thing that is holding it, and since it can't feel the foot, that is likely to be chewed on too.

    Snares and conibears can go for more time if the weather is good. Also - even a conibear can hold an animal and not kill it - lost a wolverine that way once.

    Weather also plays a roll - with traps that kill... if temps aren't cold enough to freeze the animal fairly quickly, you could end up with a rotten hide. Also scavengers, ravens and birds that find dead trapped animals can ruin the pelt.

    I don't know what the 'rule of thumb' is for the trappers association..but I would say 3 days or less is a good rule of thumb.

    Besides if you are making regular trips to check your line, I think there is less liklihood of animal and trap theft.

    Good luck on your ventures.
    Thanks for your input.

  5. #5
    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Juli said it well Jack, the type of trap and game your after can dictate a lot. Raccoons will chew their leg off as soon as it gets numb. In IL its the law to check once every 24 hours and I have no problem with that. Traps or snares designed to kill the prey I could see going 2 or 3days in places where legal if the weather was cool enough. I enjoy trapping but also realize it has a cruel side as well and I want to be as humane as I can be...
    When asked what state I live in I say "The State of Confusion", better known as IL....

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Smokey View Post
    Juli said it well Jack, the type of trap and game your after can dictate a lot. Raccoons will chew their leg off as soon as it gets numb. In IL its the law to check once every 24 hours and I have no problem with that. Traps or snares designed to kill the prey I could see going 2 or 3days in places where legal if the weather was cool enough. I enjoy trapping but also realize it has a cruel side as well and I want to be as humane as I can be...
    Hey Smokey, I actually wasn't thinking about it being cruel or inhumane at all. I'm actually kind of surprised at the results of the poll so far. In your situation I can see why checking every 24 hours is crucial (even required), but I know some trappers up here that only check there traps once a week or even once every couple weeks. That being said, I know a lot of guys up here use snares and trap in location where the animal will stay frozen in between sets. I know there is concern about other critters coming along and ruining the pelt though. I was just curious what that average time most people check their sets though. I think it also has a lot to do with access. A lot of people trap close to town and so checking their sets often is doable. Other people might have to drive 3 or 4 hours to check their line so it is not practical to check that often. Thanks for your input.

  7. #7
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    My method doesn't quite fit your answers When we have snow and ice (so back in 2013) I run two main lines I check one day skin the next check the other line the next day then skin again so basically am over each line every 4 days so felt my best option was to check the twice a week button. If I am over a week due to extreem weather I start bouncing off the walls and going when I probably should be staying home and safe. It is the annual midwinter thaw that gets me shut down the longest waiting on safe ice on creeks to refreeze or overflow to drop back under the ice. Sure hope we see winter in Feb this is gone on for too long!
    meats meat don't knock it till you try it

  8. #8

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    North Carolina and Virginia law is check every 24 hours. Submerged body grips are 72 hours in N.C. and not sure about in Virginia as I do not trap water in Virginia.

  9. #9
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    Once a week. No way in justifying checking traps any sooner then this for me. Way too much gas and wear and tear on me and the machine. Most full time trappers I know are on the same schedule. Wolf and wolverine lines are an even longer wait as their travel routes are longer. My daughter and I checked traps this last Sat and had nothing but yesterday I was ice fishing a few hundred yards away and on the other side a huge hill and we kept hearing some strange noises. We rode down the trapper trail and had another big lynx bouncing this week..


  10. #10
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    Using snares I check every sunday as I only have that one day off due to wrestling. When when I start rat trapping again I check every day or every other day.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by trailblazersteve View Post
    Once a week. No way in justifying checking traps any sooner then this for me. Way too much gas and wear and tear on me and the machine. Most full time trappers I know are on the same schedule. Wolf and wolverine lines are an even longer wait as their travel routes are longer. My daughter and I checked traps this last Sat and had nothing but yesterday I was ice fishing a few hundred yards away and on the other side a huge hill and we kept hearing some strange noises. We rode down the trapper trail and had another big lynx bouncing this week..

    Right on Steve! Thanks for the input and nice lynx.

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